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Sudi

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  • 138
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  • 92
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  • In Pieces

  • By: Sally Field
  • Narrated by: Sally Field
  • Length: 10 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,610
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,384
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,369

In this intimate, haunting, literary memoir read by the author, an American icon tells her story for the first time, in her own gorgeous words - about a challenging and lonely childhood, the craft that helped her find her voice, and a powerful emotional legacy that shaped her journey as a daughter and a mother. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Field draws you in then drops you off

  • By Jesg on 09-23-18

Just a Great Autobiography

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-07-18

Ms. Field is candid and her narration is expressive. (Of course! She is a fine actor and she doesn't race through her reading.)

She really is an icon in our pop culture and cinematic history and worth getting to know on a human, accessible level since some of her life's experiences are universally recognized... some in a most unfortunate, unspeakable way, regrettably.

I enjoy learning about the elements of peoples' lives and the amazing circumstances that always shape them... most of the time the circumstances are of the you-can't-make-this-stuff-up! variety. Ms Field has had her share of them. Some really good... some really not good.

But Ms. Field let's you get to know her with all the good, bad and in between things that have made her who she is.

  • This Is Your Life, Harriet Chance

  • By: Jonathan Evison
  • Narrated by: Susan Boyce
  • Length: 6 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 212
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 194
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 196

With her husband Bernard two years in the grave, seventy-nine-year-old Harriet Chance sets sail on an ill-conceived Alaskan cruise only to discover through a series of revelations that she's been living the past sixty years of her life under entirely false pretenses. There, amid the buffets and lounge singers, between the imagined appearance of her late husband and the very real arrival of her estranged daughter midway through the cruise, Harriet is forced to take a long look back, confronting the truth about pivotal events that changed the course of her life.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Absolutely and completely.

  • By joyce on 03-14-16

Great Character Development :)

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-04-18

The narration is great, too.

Harriet has reached a time in life that is difficult. And it gets more difficult, when the average person thinks complications concerning best friends and husbands (especially dead ones) should be getting easier.

Harriet's husband has died after a trial of care taking by Harriet. She gets surprised by a cruise that her husband arranged before his death.

And then Harriet begins to discover what her life was really all about.

Something, you think, that for most people is already nailed down by the time you have reached your 70s. But not in Harriet Chance's case.

The book is artfully crafted and the plot unfolds at at good pace.

The character development is great and the narrator does a superb job of affecting several age groups and genders.

I give it 5 Stars and an endorsement for anyone who appreciates plot-driven, well written novels.

  • Calypso

  • By: David Sedaris
  • Narrated by: David Sedaris
  • Length: 6 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,611
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 8,704
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,630

If you've ever laughed your way through David Sedaris's cheerfully misanthropic stories, you might think you know what you're getting with Calypso. You'd be wrong. When he buys a beach house on the Carolina coast, Sedaris envisions long, relaxing vacations spent playing board games and lounging in the sun with those he loves most. And it's as idyllic as he imagined, except for one tiny, vexing realization: it's impossible to take a vacation from yourself. With Calypso, Sedaris sets his formidable powers of observation - and dark humor - toward middle age and mortality.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent, as always

  • By Ruthie on 05-31-18

The Dark Side

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-04-18

Who doesn't love David Sedaris? He's witty, honest and self deprecating (at times.) His writing is impeccable and his anecdotes are riveting.

Tales told with his brand of sarcasm are never boring... and once hearing him in a live performance left me feeling he hadn't charged enough for the tickets, after all.

David has reached a time in life where joking about senility, elder care and the rougher side of parental aging no longer seems as funny as when you were younger and further away from that eventual, potential reality. Even when he is with his simpatico sister evaluating a visit they just made to their 90+ -year-old father's home, they cannot with heroic attempts at adequate humor avoid the sad, challenging and grim reality of an aging and eccentric human being that happens to be their dad.

Mr. Sedaris is a little younger than me and I sympathize with his horror and shock. Having already gone through the pain of watching a strong, independent person devolve into one who remedies bruises from falling with tape and paper towels, I truly understand how emotionally debilitating it is to the observer. Joking about adult incontinence when you're 30 just isn't quite as funny as joking about wearing adult diapers when your Dad is the one you have to buy them for -- and you're now staring down at 60 yourself.

It's just life. And death. But it isn't as frivolous a topic when you begin living it close to home. The darkness of aging and loss crept into Sedaris' writing.

And still the book is entertaining.

How can it not be at this stage of life?

  • The Beach at Painter's Cove

  • A Novel
  • By: Shelley Noble
  • Narrated by: Erin Bennett
  • Length: 12 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 486
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 449
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 448

The Whitaker family's Connecticut mansion, Muses by the Sea, has always been a haven for artists, a hotbed of creativity, extravagances, and the occasional scandal. Art patrons for generations, the Whitakers supported strangers but drained the life out of each other. Now, after being estranged for years, four generations of Whitaker women find themselves once again at the Muses. Leo, the Whitaker matriarch, lives in the rambling mansion.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A great read that takes you along for the ride!

  • By Yelena Tishchenko on 04-13-18

Veeeerrry Light Reading

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-27-18

This is book for listening to as you drive to the beach for a vacation.

It concerns a young professional woman involved in museum work who actually comes from an eccentric, artsy family whose free-flowing roots are out of the "Love, Peace and Make Love, Not War" 60's and 70s.

Problems arise when she receives a phone call about a missing sister and the abandoned children of that sister who are left with elder relatives whose hay-day was in the hippie days of the 60's.

There is mild romance and financial problems-- the $$ problems form the crux of the plot, along with the abandoned children. It's a mild book, in the long run.

It is a very low-tension plot and at no times do you honestly feel any of the characters are in real jeopardy. For that reason, I felt at times I was reading a "young adult" novel. Maybe it is for "tweens" and I just missed that somehow.

In any event, it's harmless but not 100% engaging.

The narrator does a good job.

  • The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

  • A Novel
  • By: Taylor Jenkins Reid
  • Narrated by: Alma Cuervo, Julia Whelan, Robin Miles
  • Length: 12 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,675
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,484
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,477

Aging and reclusive Hollywood movie icon Evelyn Hugo is finally ready to tell the truth about her glamorous and scandalous life. But when she chooses unknown magazine reporter Monique Grant for the job, no one in the journalism community is more astounded than Monique herself. Why her? Why now? Monique is not exactly on top of the world. Her husband, David, has left her, and her career has stagnated.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Five Out of Seven Ain't Bad

  • By Dubi on 12-31-17

Good Solid Characters

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-10-18

Pros: 1) The characters are well developed and have distinct, colorful personalities, for the most part. 2) The setting, Hollywood in the 50s and 60s, is always dramatically recalled, so the reader already has some of that background richness embedded in the structure, just by osmosis. 3) The plot develops an unexpected turn fairly early on in the book, something I didn't see occurring, so the drama was ramped up somewhat. 4)The author used the repressions of LGBQT people's civil rights in an earlier time to create complications in the story, which did make the problems realistic.

Cons: 1) The very thing which creates most of the problems for the main character are the conventions/laws of the time period. Unfortunately, that made the plot and the characters responses to their dilemmas a little predictable. 2) After a while, the world of Evelyn Hugo became a somewhat closed-in.... while she pursued the one true love of her life. That pursuit sort of made all her other entanglements not as gripping since you knew all along where her heart truly was. 4) The plot bounces between two eras, the present and Hugo's earlier life. The present involves the life and loves of a young aspiring journalist who is interviewing Hugo about her life for an exclusive biography. I think the book could have used more plot twists about the current aspiring journalist's life because I got the feeling the author wants the reader to see a life-learning curve between the younger and older woman as the younger woman interviews the older woman... but that doesn't really come across as it should within the unfolding story-- but only at the end in a very linear summary by the younger woman.

All in all, the book held my interest. I chose it without knowing it was a LGBQT based plot and am not sure I would have jumped into it had I known-- because I might have assumed the characters' dilemmas would land outside my viewpoint. However, like any good book, it dealt with Universal Themes of Success, Love and Loss. And the prices we pay for them.

So in that case, it didn't matter who the love interests were of the characters, it was dealing with human problems. Which made it Universally interesting overall.

  • The Stolen Marriage

  • A Novel
  • By: Diane Chamberlain
  • Narrated by: Susan Bennett
  • Length: 14 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,566
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,399
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,393

In 1944, 23-year-old Tess DeMello abruptly ends her engagement to the love of her life when she marries a mysterious stranger and moves to Hickory, North Carolina, a small town struggling with racial tension and the hardships imposed by World War II. Tess' new husband, Henry Kraft, is a secretive man who often stays out all night, hides money from his new wife, and shows no interest in making love. Tess quickly realizes she's trapped in a strange and loveless marriage with no way out.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This is the best book I have ever listened to!!!

  • By Sandi Johnson on 11-26-17

Great Characters and Dialogue

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-10-18

Ms. Chamberlain takes her time developing the time period, the characters' relationships and their core motivations.

I thought the dialogue was believable and richly developed for each player in the story. Also, the good people were not all good and the bad people were not all bad. In other words, they were like real human beings caught in life's real dilemmas and trials.

The plot involves racial barriers and prejudices and ethnic dilemmas and prejudices in an earlier time period. I thought Ms. Chamberlain handled the plot deftly and with a resolution that kept me interested till the end.

  • The Address

  • A Novel
  • By: Fiona Davis
  • Narrated by: Saskia Maarleveld, Brittany Pressley
  • Length: 11 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,847
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,701
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,701

After a failed apprenticeship, working her way up to head housekeeper of a posh London hotel is more than Sara Smythe ever thought she'd make of herself. But when a chance encounter with Theodore Camden, one of the architects of the grand New York apartment house The Dakota, leads to a job offer, her world is suddenly awash in possibility - no mean feat for a servant in 1884. The opportunity to move to America, where a person can rise above one's station.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Should be a movie!

  • By Linda Slater on 10-19-17

Poor Character Development Hobbles Storyline

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-10-18

The story starts out with a promising conflict at the beginning. Unfortunately, the characters and plot devolve into a Victorian hyper-drama by mid-way in the book.

I actually like it when authors use pre-tech eras in which to place a story. No gizmos to move the plot with little effort or cogitation while Googling a quick answer to a plot's complication. So I had high hopes for a solid
historically fictionalized tale based on human conflict, well delineated characters and good old fashioned resolutions.

Instead, Ms. Davis seems to have decided to resort to Dickensian weepy-ness in some of the plot turns, one replete with an Evil Asylum Nurse who growls at the misfortunately accursed heroine just because she's well... an Evil Asylum Nurse. No other character development was used -- other than the old standby trope of: Institutionalization = The Mandatory Bad Nurse Ratchet Should Be On Premises...

It might be your cup of lukewarm tea but for me, it turned into "Oh Brother... did the author really just have the stereotypical Evil Institutional Nurse make her protagonist re-scrub the floor where she just smudged it with her Evil Nurse's muddy shoe??"

It was just too little bedrock in the characters for me to give hang about them, so I quit 1/2 way through.

As I've mentioned before, I used to finish EVERY book... giving them a chance to the end for redemption. But now, I have realized there are too many good books out there to waste my time with a bad one.

So I move on.

  • The Wife Between Us

  • By: Greer Hendricks, Sarah Pekkanen
  • Narrated by: Julia Whelan
  • Length: 11 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,656
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,095
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,046

When you listen to this audiobook, you will make many assumptions. You will assume you are listening to a story about a jealous ex-wife. You will assume she is obsessed with her replacement - a beautiful, younger woman who is about to marry the man they both love. You will assume you know the anatomy of this tangled love triangle. Assume nothing. Twisted and deliciously chilling, The Wife Between Us exposes the secret complexities of an enviable marriage - and the dangerous truths we ignore in the name of love.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • NOT that confusing! Gone Girl + Last Mrs. Parrish

  • By Jenn on 01-11-18

Conclusion Unfolds in an Interesting Way

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-26-18

In all, the book was good. It keeps you wondering what a former wife, nicknamed 'Nelly' by her former husband 'Richard, is trying to accomplish by not moving on with her life and by keeping a constant focus on her former husband.

There is also a new woman in the former husband's life... his fiancee. She seems to be slightly unsurprising, given the former wife's insights into her marriage with Richard. She seems to be similar to 'Nelly' in physicality and temperament... that in itself sets up a readers' curiosity as to discovering what it was that caused Nelly's and Richard's divorce.

You keep listening to see what is propelling Nelly's laser beamed interest on Richard.

One other reviewer says that the ending was a sort of let down and I do agree with her. But I am giving the book a 4 stars because it did keep me going all the way to the end.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Woman in the Window

  • A Novel
  • By: A. J. Finn
  • Narrated by: Ann Marie Lee
  • Length: 13 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 18,170
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 16,708
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 16,656

Anna Fox lives alone - a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times...and spying on her neighbors. Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, mother, their teenaged son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn't, her world begins to crumble. And its shocking secrets are laid bare.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • STAY AWAY!!!

  • By Susan Olson on 06-02-18

A Hitchcockian Mystery; Great Listen

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-19-18

This Book is really fun for anyone who can:

1) visualize old black and white films from the Classic Age in Hollywood and
2) anyone who enjoys a Hitchcock style mystery

Finn weaves a mystery which involves you, the reader, by keeping the narrator in an unstable position. Meaning the main character might be crazy.

Can you trust her observations?

This is a classic twist in some Hitchcock movies. It never wears thin. And it works well in "The Woman in the Window."

Finn also throws in references to classic Black and White films and stars that made them forever great.

If you enjoy old movies and a good mystery, you should like this well fleshed out and well written book.

  • Getting Past Anxiety

  • By: Melissa A. Woods
  • Narrated by: Melissa A. Woods
  • Length: 6 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2

Getting Past Anxiety serves as an inspiration for healing. In this audiobook, listeners find a connection to their own stories of anxiety and to their authentic self. The novel traces the journey of Stella Maris, a 37-year-old professional woman in the Pacific Northwest who is fighting to escape anxiety. She breaks free by delving into and reexamining key life events, deeply committing to healing, and employing a variety of medical modalities that keep her free of anti-anxiety medications and drugs.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Really hit a chord for me!

  • By Amazon Customer on 07-12-18

Not For Me...But May Be For You

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-24-18

I didn't finish listening to this book because Ms. Woods' premise of 'getting past anxiety' is based on New Age work. I'm not saying it doesn't work for some people but I believe New Age guidance is based on a placebo effect. (Which I DO, in any event, think works in SOME instances.)

But since I do not think colors and chakras and blaming everything on our mother(s) is the root of anxiety this book was of no use to me, personally. (I think most anxiety is probably due to biological chemical imbalances which can probably be handled with non-medicinal means sometimes but not always.)

This means that this author's remedy wasn't going to give me any valuable advice.

It might yield solutions and direction for you, however.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful