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Kristen

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  • Stranger Things: Suspicious Minds

  • The First Official Stranger Things Novel
  • By: Gwenda Bond
  • Narrated by: Kristen Sieh
  • Length: 8 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 206
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 200
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 200

It’s the summer of 1969, and the shock of conflict reverberates through the youth of America, both at home and abroad. As a student at a quiet college campus in the heartland of Indiana, Terry Ives couldn’t be farther from the front lines of Vietnam or the incendiary protests in Washington. But the world is changing, and Terry isn’t content to watch from the sidelines. When word gets around about an important government experiment in the small town of Hawkins, she signs on as a test subject for the project, code named MKULTRA. 

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Good Storyline, Poor Performance

  • By Kristen on 02-21-19

Good Storyline, Poor Performance

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-21-19

Pros:
Actually one pro. Overall, this story is a necessary one for any fan of Stranger Things. The backgrounds of different key characters provides a full-circle tie-in with the Netflix series. Many questions were answered, and I didn't come across any loose ends in this prequel.

Cons:
- the person reading this was very difficult to listen to on far too many occasions. Her accents for certain characters (namely Gloria and Kali) were horrible and unnecessary. She made other characters sound more like they should be driving around in the Mystery Machine with Scooby Doo than members of the insightful counter culture of the 1960s. Think voices you'd use to impersonate frat boys and valley girls. Overall, the tacky accents and voices for the different characters were a distraction, and not a good one at that.

- The pop culture references were obnoxious and desperate. Talking in detail about everything from the moon landing, to Woodstock, to Lord of the Rings... it was all so unnecessary. I tend to think that anyone interested in Stranger Things would be familiar with all the cultural landmarks mentioned in this book. And familiarity is all they need. They don't need to hear details about late 60s/early 70s pop culture just because they're reading/listening to a book taking place during that time period.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Comfortably Numb

  • The Inside Story of Pink Floyd
  • By: Mark Blake
  • Narrated by: Graeme Malcolm
  • Length: 17 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 141
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 132
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 132

Mark Blake draws on his own interviews with band members as well as the group's friends, road crew, musical contemporaries, former housemates, and university colleagues to produce a riveting history of one of the biggest rock bands of all time. We follow Pink Floyd from the early psychedelic nights at UFO, to the stadium-rock and concept-album zenith of the '70s, to the acrimonious schisms of the late '80s and '90s.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Would read the actual book

  • By Bo Bilstrup on 06-09-18

Too much emphasis on media coverage and opinions

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-16-18

This book had a good amount of information regarding Syd and the band in general. However, there was far too much emphasis placed on how they and their music were perceived in the media. It's not a true "inside look" once any sort of relevance is placed on outside opinions held in various forms of media. Because really, who cares what the reviews in main stream media outlets held? The band sure didn't, as they continued creating the music that felt right to them (well, minus the Roger Waters take over when it came to The Wall). Needless to say, it would have been nice to hear more about the thought processes that went into the music, especially the masterpieces. The book tells the reader how the songs were created from an instrumental standpoint and where ideas for certain lyrics originated from, but I would have liked to know more about the band members' perceptions. What were some of the feelings that came to them as they were in the process of creating the music? How did they know what the final cuts were? What were their feelings when they walked on stage as the opening to Speak to Me played decades after the last time they had played it live? What were their feelings as they felt the rush of excitement from the audience? I suppose these are questions that can only be answered by the band members themselves. And these questions and ones of the like are ones that we won't find the answers to in this book, as it was written by someone of the outside.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful