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David Stewart

  • 5
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  • 42
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  • 26
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  • The Science of Liberty

  • Democracy, Reason, and the Laws of Nature
  • By: Timothy Ferris
  • Narrated by: Fred Stella
  • Length: 13 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 33
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 23
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 24

In his most important book to date, award-winning author Timothy Ferris — “the best popular science writer in the English language today” (Christian Science Monitor) — makes a passionate case for science as the inspiration behind the rise of liberalism and democracy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Yes, the west is best, or better

  • By Dennis on 03-30-16

A very interesting book. An odd performance.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-15-13

Any additional comments?

An interesting book. The performance left a lot to be desired. The narrator reads the book as though it's a pop-psychology self-help book. And he is unfamiliar with some of what he's reading: Within the first chapter, there were three mispronounced words. ("Zoroastrianism," "probabilistic," and the first one which I don't recall because I didn't think it would keep happening.)

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Logical Leap

  • Induction in Physics
  • By: David Harriman
  • Narrated by: Erik Singer
  • Length: 10 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 141
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 61
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 63

Beginning with a detailed discussion of the role of mathematics and experimentation in validating generalizations in physics-looking closely at the reasoning of scientists such as Galileo, Kepler, Newton, Lavoisier, and Maxwell-Harriman skillfully argues that the inductive method used in philosophy is in principle indistinguishable from the method used in physics.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful journey through scientific history

  • By David on 08-17-10

Fascinating, profound philosophical work

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-04-13

Would you listen to The Logical Leap again? Why?

This book is a profound exploration of one of philosophy's most challenging problems: The epistemological problem of inductive logic, and the establishment of truths about the material world. Harriman shows, using intensive explorations of the experimental science of Galileo, Newton, Watterston, and other scientists, how scientific laws and theories can be proven. I have listened to it three times, learning new things each time, and deepening my understanding of both the matter of the book, science itself, and logic.

Have you listened to any of Erik Singer’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

The narrator does a fantastic job. His pace is perfect, and his inflection is natural. He doesn't seem to be reading.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Modern Times

  • The World from the Twenties to the Nineties
  • By: Paul Johnson
  • Narrated by: Nadia May
  • Length: 37 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 263
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 155
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 158

Beginning with May 29, 1919, when photographs of the solar eclipse confirmed the truth of Einstein's theory of relativity, Johnson goes on to describe Freudianism, the establishment of the first Marxist state, the chaos of "Old Europe", the Arcadian 20s, and the new forces in China and Japan. Also discussed are Karl Marx, Hitler, Mussolini, Stalin, Roosevelt, Gandhi, Castro, Kennedy, Nixon, the '29 crash, the Great Depression, Roosevelt's New Deal, and the massive conflict of World War II.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Anti-Howard Zinn

  • By Pork C. Fish on 05-22-12

Excellent book, flawed recording performance

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-09-09

Johnson's work is excellent. It is wide ranging, fair and understanding. (Despite an earlier reviewer's statement that this is history according to Ayn Rand and that all Republicans are praised, etc.--well, those claims are outright false. He presents fairly, without bias. It's history, not campaigning.)
The recording performance by Nadia May, however, is not so excellent. She has a particular manner of speaking, with her thick British accent, which causes her to swallow syllables repeatedly--the volume drops to inaudibility after a stressed word, or a word gets shortened to a length that makes it near impossible to hear. If the syllable is a whole word, you will lose the whole word. Sometimes it's as many as three words rushed through with a drop in volume and a clipping of the word or words, and the sense is gone. These things happen again and again in the recording, and I'm actually surprised her producer didn't notice it (unless, perhaps, he or she speaks English in the same way). Also, the bad accents for quotations---Russian, French, German, Slav (but oddly, no attempt to quote Americans with an American accent--I wonder why?)---are kind of funny. However, they do serve the purpose of letting the listener know when a quotation has begun and ended.

12 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • Healthy at 100

  • By: John Robbins
  • Narrated by: Raymond Todd
  • Length: 10 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 190
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 126
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 125

Why do some people age in failing health and sadness, while others grow old with vitality and joy? In this revolutionary audiobook, best-selling author John Robbins presents us with a bold new paradigm of aging, showing us how we can increase not only our lifespan but also our health span.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Changed my life

  • By Paul on 04-09-12

Faulty file

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-05-09

The Format 4 file is corrupted and does not play beyond about 53 minutes into the first chapter.

7 of 18 people found this review helpful

  • Wealth of Nations

  • By: Adam Smith
  • Narrated by: Michael Edwards
  • Length: 35 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 249
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 78
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 75

This classic statement of economic liberalism or the policy of laissez-faire was first published in 1776. It is an engrossing analysis of the economic facts of life. Several fundamental principles, many of which are now referred to as axioms, were introduced in this work, the division of labor, supply-and-demand, and free market capitalism being among the most obvious.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Worth the effort

  • By Peter on 09-21-04

The footnotes ruined it.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-09-05

Smith's book is of a piece. This audio book is impossible to follow, because the narrator reads the scholarly apparatus right in the stream of the book. So you'll have a paragraph of Smith, and then two paragraphs of footnotes from the editor, then Smith for a couple paragraphs, then another footnote... it makes it impossible to follow the development of Smith's argument. Audible seriously needs to get another version of this book.

21 of 22 people found this review helpful