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  • The Compassionate Mind

  • By: Paul Gilbert
  • Narrated by: Rupert Farley
  • Length: 22 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 43
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 43

Throughout history people have sought to cope with a life that is often stressful and hard. We have actually known for some time that developing compassion for oneself and others can help us face up to and win through the hardship and find a sense of inner peace. However in modern societies we rarely focus on this key process that underpins successful coping and happiness and can be quick to dismiss the impact of modern living on our minds and well-being. Instead we concentrate on 'doing, achieving' and having'.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Like water for a thirsty wanderer

  • By Vickie on 09-02-13

Like water for a thirsty wanderer

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-02-13

What did you love best about The Compassionate Mind?

The author's kindness and humor. He felt like a friend, helping me through difficult--but crucial--information that will help my life for years and years to come. I will always be grateful to him for this.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Compassionate Mind?

A few things. When he mentioned other works by other authors (Napoleon Hill's "How to Win Friends and Influence People" which basically tells us to just LISTEN to each other; John Price's work; Mark Leary's book "The Curse of the Self"; and many more), I quite often took note of that for future looking into.

The author's book focuses on explaining complex ideas about self-compassion (and compassion for others) in easily-understood language, and to tell we the readers that we CAN attain this elusive and wonderful gift of self-compassion/other compassion.

The gold in this book, which was repeated in many different ways throughout the book (helping me to understand it from different angles and within different contexts), THE THEME UPON WHICH THIS BOOK IS WRITTEN, is that it isn't our fault that we are critical or judgmental toward ourselves or others, or might feel superior/inferior, OR that we suffer from anxiety, fear, anger, or depression. Further--and what really brings it home for me--is that it is natural to feel a sudden flood of anxiety, fear, or a feeling of anger or wanting to exact revenge. AND that, because of how our brains have evolved, it is also natural for us to ruminate on these momentary feelings for days, months, and even years. It is also natural to feel a wide spectrum of feelings. They are not the enemies. What IS important is being aware of them and dealing with them so they don't overtake your life (like my reference to rumination--which is only one example).

In a phrase, he wants us to "experience rather than self-judge/judge others"; to be kind, loving, self-compassionate/compassionate, and warm towards ourselves and others. His full chapters, coming at the subject from many angles, and his exercises teach us how to do this.

This is not a difficult, scientifically-slanted book, though it is grounded firmly in science. It is also not a spiritual book per se, though you can certainly come at it from that angle, should you enjoy that. It is just, plain and simple, a very, very practical book. It doesn't throw around any far-flinging (what I call) "woo-woo" terms which other books might. It's real. It's down to earth. It's usable in everyday life.

He gave hope to this reader.

I feel more hope now, after hearing this book (which I'll be restarting at the beginning as soon as I've finished the first go-through, and I'm going to listen to it again and again) than I have in three decades of anti-depressants, anti-anxiety meds, and therapies with dozens of philosophies and advice.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

As others have stated, this book is very long. But it is, by no means, too long--for all of its in-depth coverage of vital (and in my view life-saving) information. There is nothing I would have edited out to cut down the length. I have been listening to it in 3-4 blocks of time. But you could easily listen to it in one-hour increments or full day's-worth segments of time.

Any additional comments?

Buy this book, and then let it wash over you, confront your prior attitudes and opinions, and amaze you. His book is tightly focused, well-planned and executed, and practical for novices and experienced alike! I'm going to look for more by this author.

As a side note: this book is written by a British author, and the audio book is read by a British narrator. However, as an American, I had no trouble understanding every single word. In addition, I didn't have to strain to hear every single word with ease--the tone was even in volume and cadence throughout the entire piece.

Buy this book. It will make you feel so much better and more hopeful about yourself and your world than you could have ever imagined. I think these ideas are going to make a huge difference in my life as I begin to orient my gaze toward its premises, exercises, and practical applications.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Unexpected Legacy of Divorce

  • A 25-Year Landmark Study
  • By: Judith Wallerstein, Julia Lewis, Sandra Blakeslee
  • Narrated by: Kate McIntire
  • Length: 5 hrs and 52 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 147
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 94
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 93

Using a comparison group of adults who grew up in the same communities but whose parents never divorced, Wallerstein shows how adult children of divorce essentially view life differently from their peers in intact homes, and also sheds light on the question that so many parents confront: whether to stay unhappily married or to divorce. This book is a landmark cultural event that will change the way all of us view divorce.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Overall it was Insightful

  • By C. Rodowsky on 03-03-15

Not for those in pain

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-03-13

Would you ever listen to anything by the authors again?

No. This book is a set of pom poms, a cheer leading manual, for how great divorce is and how you can be better than ever because of your divorce. It is not for anyone who is suffering rejection, abandonment, loneliness.

Any additional comments?

You have VERY few books on abandonment or rejection. Why not?

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Fully Present

  • The Science, Art, and Practice of Mindfulness
  • By: Susan Smally Ph.D., Diana Winston
  • Narrated by: Elizabeth London
  • Length: 8 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 332
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 263
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 257

Mindfulness—the art of paying attention with openness and curiosity to the present moment—has attracted ever-growing interest and tens of thousands of practitioners. This uniquely accessible guide provides a scientific explanation for how mindfulness positively and powerfully affects the brain and body, as well as practical guidance.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Decent information but very boring

  • By Dan on 10-20-15

Excellent for those studying subject but...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-03-13

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

This is not a book for someone who is trying to learn how to do mindfulness. It is a complete history, full of definitions and research studies.

Has Fully Present turned you off from other books in this genre?

No.

27 of 32 people found this review helpful