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Seamus Michael Ryan

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  • The Purples

  • By: W. K. Berger
  • Narrated by: Chris Andrew Ciulla
  • Length: 14 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 24
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 21

Shunned by his community...locked up for trying to help an innocent girl...ambushed by rivals and left for dead in the Detroit River, Joe Bernstein has a few scores to settle, and a bold plan to seize control of the Motor City in its booming 1920s heyday. With his faithful "agent", Abie; his brilliant but fragile brother, Max; and an out-of-control enforcer named Grabowski (not to mention a couple of carnivorous creatures known as "the babies"), Bernstein gives rise to the infamous Purple Gang....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Gritty story...entertaining listen...who knew?

  • By david on 03-16-14

Good Historical Fiction with Great Narration

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-03-14

What made the experience of listening to The Purples the most enjoyable?

The storyline was intricate enough to hold my interest, but not so much so as to be confusing (I'm looking at you, Jonathan Franzen), which made it an excellent choice for listening to in the car. Really, though, the narrator was great. His reading was rhythmic, melodious and pitch-perfect, and really seemed to capture the essence of what the author was trying to convey.

What other book might you compare The Purples to and why?

I suppose "The Purples" belongs in the same general category as the Elmore Leonard books or maybe Michael Chabon's "The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay."

Have you listened to any of Chris Andrew Ciulla’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I have not, but I will definitely look for more stuff that he's done. As I've noted, his narration was simply excellent.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Detroit is a rough town, and always has been.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful