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Ken Premo

Los Angeles
  • 20
  • reviews
  • 147
  • helpful votes
  • 70
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  • Becoming Nicole

  • The Transformation of an American Family
  • By: Amy Ellis Nutt
  • Narrated by: Amy Ellis Nutt
  • Length: 8 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 507
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 460
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 457

When Wayne and Kelly Maines adopted identical twin boys, they thought their lives were complete. But it wasn't long before they noticed a marked difference between Jonas and his brother, Wyatt. Jonas preferred sports and trucks and many of the things little boys were "supposed" to like; but Wyatt liked princess dolls and dress-up and playing Little Mermaid. By the time the twins were toddlers, confusion over Wyatt's insistence that he was female began to tear the family apart.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • More narratives like this, please.

  • By book worm on 10-22-15

Extraordinary story, very poor narration.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-19-18

The story of Nicole Mains is amazing and heartening, certainly worth reading and sharing. I would absolutely recommend the written book rather than the audio version as the author is a very poor narrator and the awkwardness of her reading prevented me from becoming truly engaged.

  • How to Change Your Mind

  • What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence
  • By: Michael Pollan
  • Narrated by: Michael Pollan
  • Length: 13 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 8,055
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 7,285
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 7,221

When Michael Pollan set out to research how LSD and psilocybin (the active ingredient in magic mushrooms) are being used to provide relief to people suffering from difficult-to-treat conditions such as depression, addiction, and anxiety, he did not intend to write what is undoubtedly his most personal book. But upon discovering how these remarkable substances are improving the lives not only of the mentally ill but also of healthy people coming to grips with the challenges of everyday life, he decided to explore the landscape of the mind in the first person as well as the third.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A delightful trip

  • By Paul E. Williams on 05-19-18

Little science

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-16-18

Not the type of book I was expecting. Very, very little science. Lots of anecdotes about psychedelic trips, especially the author’s, but then only speculation of the psychological benefits such therapies might provide.

The narration was nicely done.

  • Our Mathematical Universe

  • My Quest for the Ultimate Nature of Reality
  • By: Max Tegmark
  • Narrated by: Rob Shapiro
  • Length: 15 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,733
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,551
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,545

Max Tegmark leads us on an astonishing journey through past, present and future, and through the physics, astronomy, and mathematics that are the foundation of his work, most particularly his hypothesis that our physical reality is a mathematical structure and his theory of the ultimate multiverse. In a dazzling combination of both popular and groundbreaking science, he not only helps us grasp his often mind-boggling theories, but he also shares with us some of the often surprising triumphs and disappointments that have shaped his life as a scientist.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wow!

  • By Michael on 02-02-14

Great book until the last 1/3 which is painful.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-30-16

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

First 2/3 of this book are wonderful. Max Tegmark has an amazing understanding of today's physics and he conveys this in an interesting and understandable manner. Absolutely enjoyable until the last 1/3 of the book, where Tegmark goes into his personal theories and casual observations. This last portion of the book has very little evidence or credibility and Tegmark's wonderfully clear prose falls away to muddled and random speculation. The last chapters drag to a point that it is difficult to finish - and isn't worth the effort.

  • Power

  • Why Some People Have It - and Others Don't
  • By: Jeffrey Pfeffer
  • Narrated by: David Drummond
  • Length: 8 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 513
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 411
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 408

Brimming with counterintuitive advice, numerous examples from various countries, and surprising findings, this groundbreaking guide reveals the strategies and tactics that separate the winners from the losers. Power is a force that can be used and harnessed not only for individual gain but also for the benefit of organizations and society. Power, however, is not something that can be learned from those in charge....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent Advice

  • By Douglas C. Bates on 05-03-14

Waste of time

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-02-16

Has Power turned you off from other books in this genre?

Definitely

What did you like about the performance? What did you dislike?

The performance was fine though difficult to separate from the subject matter.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Power?

First remove the numerous contradictions in the book. Next remove the unsupported opinions and false causal/coincidental correlations; you'd be left with a pamphlet, which wouldn't waste as much of the reader's time.

Any additional comments?

Machiavelli said it much better in the Prince, which this book seems to have simply updated examples and convoluted the meaning.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big

  • Kind of the Story of My Life
  • By: Scott Adams
  • Narrated by: Patrick Lawlor
  • Length: 8 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,715
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,164
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,150

Scott Adams has likely failed at more things than anyone you’ve ever met or anyone you’ve even heard of. So how did he go from hapless office worker and serial failure to the creator of Dilbert, one of the world’s most famous syndicated comic strips, in just a few years? In How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big, Adams shares the strategy he has used since he was a teen to invite failure in, to embrace it, then pick its pocket.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • AMAZING BOOK

  • By duane barker on 02-10-14

What happened to funny

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-14

I wanted to like this book. I enjoy the Dilbert cartoons and this seemed to be a chance to become familiar with the man behind the comic strip. And perhaps that's the problem. Written like a self-help book based on the author's travails, it comes across as egotistical, dry and preachy. The narrator's monotone voice with its sarcastic inflections would have been perfect for reading the comic strip but it is too much for a full book.

Couldn't finish the book and gave-up halfway through it.

5 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Fooled by Randomness

  • The Hidden Role of Chance in Life and in the Markets
  • By: Nassim Nicholas Taleb
  • Narrated by: Sean Pratt
  • Length: 10 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,349
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,473
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,460

This audiobook is about luck, or more precisely, how we perceive and deal with luck in life and business. It is already a landmark work, and its title has entered our vocabulary. In its second edition, Fooled by Randomness is now a cornerstone for anyone interested in random outcomes.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great information but...

  • By Ken Premo on 03-26-14

Great information but...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-26-14

I really enjoyed the ideas put forward in this book and I think it is very important that randomness and statistics be better understood in society. That said, the author of the book is long-winded, imperious, and extremely self focused. "I" is the most common word used throughout the book while the author disdains his fellow traders on Wall Street, his fellow MBA's, and his fellow academics.

If you can get past the author, the ideas and information of the book is worth the effort.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • The Personal MBA: Master the Art of Business

  • By: Josh Kaufman
  • Narrated by: Josh Kaufman
  • Length: 13 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,205
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,453
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,418

Josh Kaufman founded PersonalMBA.com as an alternative to the business school boondoggle. His blog has introduced hundreds of thousands of readers to the best business books and most powerful business concepts of all time. Now, he shares the essentials of entrepreneurship, marketing, sales, negotiation, operations, productivity, systems design, and much more, in one comprehensive volume. The Personal MBA distills the most valuable business lessons into simple, memorable mental models that can be applied to real-world challenges.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not an MBA, But A Damn Decent Experience.

  • By Jonny on 01-20-13

Some good, a little bad, a lot of other.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-07-13

There is good information to be found in this book, but also a great deal of twaddle. The author begins with a "straw man" argument that today's MBA programs are geared to corporate middle managers and not to entrepreneurs, which is quite correct. That is the purpose of MBA programs. Then he touts this work as addressing the needs of the entrepreneur but provides a great summary of the information found in most MBA programs.

Skip the three chapters in the center of the book that focus on personal improvement. Eating right, exercise and meditation are all topics that belong in a different kind of book. Bully for Mr Kaufman that he has gone vegan, this has no relevance to the topic.

The distillation of business concepts are where this book shines, but they are often hidden within the author's endless promotion of his own website, his stories of his failed time at P&G, and his lifestyle guides. Mr Kaufman has clearly done a great deal of reading on the topic of business and has the ability to distill the information to be very useful, but he has trouble unifying this work.

3 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs

  • How to Be Insanely Great in Front of Any Audience
  • By: Carmine Gallo
  • Narrated by: Carmine Gallo
  • Length: 4 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,159
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 984
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 983

Whether he was introducing the latest iPad or delivering a keynote presentation, Steve Jobs electrified audiences with his incomparable style and showmanship. He didn’t just convey information in his presentations; he told a story, painted a picture, and shared a vision. He gave his audience a transformative experience that was unique, inspiring, and unforgettable. Now you can do it too, by learning the specific techniques that made Jobs the most captivating communicator on the world stage.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A book that will change the way you present

  • By Carol Crouse on 08-30-13

Written and delivered in anthesis of Jobs

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-06-13

I must have quit this book too soon as I seem to missed anything to recommend. The author/narrator's only good advice is to watch Jobs presentations on YouTube and model yourself after him. Unfortunately, the author/narrator doesn't take his own advice and delivers his topic like a healer at a revival meeting. Such basic information delivered like it was manna from heaven - I had to stop listening.

1 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Automate This

  • How Algorithms Came to Rule Our World
  • By: Christopher Steiner
  • Narrated by: Walter Dixon
  • Length: 7 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,408
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,212
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,207

It used to be that to diagnose an illness, interpret legal documents, analyze foreign policy, or write a newspaper article you needed a human being with specific skills - and maybe an advanced degree or two. These days, high-level tasks are increasingly being handled by algorithms that can do precise work not only with speed but also with nuance. These "bots" started with human programming and logic, but now their reach extends beyond what their creators ever expected.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Wide-ranging, non-technical

  • By Philo on 09-20-12

Interesting topic stretched to fill a book

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-06-13

Though there is more good than bad in Steiner's "Automate This," there isn't enough to fill a book and so reaches to include the history of computing back to Babbich and Turning. Well told, though occasionally erroneous, the story of a repeating instruction set is given more credibility than the subject deserves. Interesting but lacks the significance that the author tries to give the subject.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Language Instinct

  • How the Mind Creates Language
  • By: Steven Pinker
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey
  • Length: 18 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 739
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 618
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 608

In this classic, the world’s expert on language and mind lucidly explains everything you always wanted to know about language: how it works, how children learn it, how it changes, how the brain computes it, and how it evolved. With deft use of examples of humor and wordplay, Steven Pinker weaves our vast knowledge of language into a compelling story: language is a human instinct, wired into our brains by evolution. The Language Instinct received the William James Book Prize from the American Psychological Association....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Absolutely Amazing and Interesting

  • By J. C. on 10-28-12

Thought provoking and clearly written

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-06-13

I was initially concerned by the length of this book, being a sign that I was in for a tedious listen. How pleasantly surprised I was by this clearly written and interesting work. Fascinating look at how similar all languages are and how they evolve over time. Pinker shows that for the human species, language is instinctual. Highly recommended.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful