LISTENER

Greg Lindsay

Washington, USA
  • 9
  • reviews
  • 10
  • helpful votes
  • 11
  • ratings
  • So You Want to Talk About Race

  • By: Ijeoma Oluo
  • Narrated by: Bahni Turpin
  • Length: 7 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,168
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,051
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,041

In So You Want to Talk About Race, Ijeoma Oluo offers a contemporary, accessible take on the racial landscape in America, addressing head-on such issues as privilege, police brutality, intersectionality, micro-aggressions, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the "N" word. Perfectly positioned to bridge the gap between people of color and white Americans struggling with race complexities, Oluo answers the questions listeners don't dare ask, and explains the concepts that continue to elude everyday Americans.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent book, excellently narrated.

  • By AmazonCustomer on 02-05-18

Some insights here but it went overboard

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-24-19

The first few chapters were pretty good and I found myself re-evaluating some of my beliefs about what sort of things should be considered racist. However, right around the chapter where it discusses cultural appropriation and abuse that people of color have suffered at the hands of the music industry, the author takes an angry arc that continues for the rest of the book.

At one point she justifies any kind of behavior by people of color when talking about race as long as it doesn't physically harm someone. If you are white, then you can be accused of "tone-policing" if you ask the discussion to be civil, and tone-policing is of course racist. I understand the point here that something needs to be done and serious problems don't get solved by treating them as trivial discussions to be forgotten by the next day. However, yelling at someone is going to hurt more than help, even if it gets you noticed. I disagreed with the author here quite strongly, and even the fact that she held this opinion made me doubt some of the other things she said. Still, I did my best to put a mental bookmark here and not judge the rest of the book.

The story about the first time she heard the n-word was something that broke my heart. Children can be so mean. However, the stories about police stopping her for minor infractions were not quite as compelling. I think the author blames some things on race that can happen to anyone. For example, I've experienced much worse myself including speeding tickets when I wasn't speeding at all, and searches for drugs when I didn't have any. I've also been beaten by kids in high school for nothing more than being a new kid in school. However, I do recognize that I've never felt that my life was in danger from the police and I think that's something people of color can feel, and have the right to feel.

All in all, the author taught me some things, so I'm glad I read the book. I just wish that she had approached some of the subjects with more of an open mind rather than with a virtual chip on her shoulder, regardless of whether or not she deserves to have that chip.

  • The Feynman Lectures on Physics: Volume 1, Quantum Mechanics

  • By: Richard P. Feynman
  • Narrated by: Richard P. Feynman
  • Length: 5 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 540
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 272
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 265

For more than 30 years, Richard P. Feynman's three-volume Lectures on Physics has been known worldwide as the classic resource for students and professionals alike. Ranging from the most basic principles of Newtonian physics through such formidable theories as Einstein's general relativity, superconductivity, and quantum mechanics, Feynman's lectures stand as a monument of clear exposition and deep insight.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Great lectures, but given at the wrong order

  • By Salvador E. Calderon on 04-04-10

Difficult to follow on audio

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-15-17

Is there anything you would change about this book?

I listened to the entire book, but without being in class and seeing the chalkboard you only get about 50% of the experience. I enjoyed listening to Feynman. The guy is a phenomenal lecturer, but he uses the chalkboard a LOT. You can hear him pointing to things and talking about this and that, and you're guessing what he means. It doesn't completely ruin the book but almost.

Would you ever listen to anything by Richard P. Feynman again?

I would not purchase any more of the lectures. I got 1 and 2, but won't get 3 and 4 just simply because it isn't worth listening to a live lecture without seeing the chalkboard.

What about Richard P. Feynman’s performance did you like?

He is very personable, and you can tell he is brilliant. It's listening to a genius in action.

Any additional comments?

It's amazing how much we knew about quantum physics over 50 years ago.

  • Shattered

  • Inside Hillary Clinton's Doomed Campaign
  • By: Jonathan Allen, Amie Parnes
  • Narrated by: Kimberly Farr
  • Length: 16 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,153
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,951
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,947

It was never supposed to be this close. And of course she was supposed to win. How Hillary Clinton lost the 2016 election to Donald Trump is the tragic story of a sure thing gone off the rails. For every Comey revelation or hindsight acknowledgment about the electorate, no explanation of defeat can begin with anything other than the core problem of Hillary's campaign - the candidate herself.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Good, But Slanted

  • By JereMiami on 05-04-17

Boring, brainless drivel.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-23-17

Disclaimer: I did not nor would ever vote for Hillary. I listened to this to try and get some perspective on her, but the entire story is told from the left. In all references, Trump is just a reviled opponent. Very little criticism is leveled directly at Hillary who is 99% to blame for losing, not 15% as the book seems to think. This is a load of bull.

4 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Beyond Matter

  • Why Science Needs Metaphysics
  • By: Roger Trigg
  • Narrated by: James Killavey
  • Length: 4 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 21
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21

Does science have all the answers? Can it even deal with abstract reasoning that reaches beyond the world experienced by us? How can we be so sure that the physical world is sufficiently ordered to be intelligible to humans? How is it that mathematics, a product of human minds, can unlock the secrets of the physical universe? Are all such questions to be ruled out as inadmissible if science cannot settle them? Metaphysics has traditionally been understood as reasoning beyond the reach of science, sometimes even claiming realities that are beyond its grasp.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beyond Matter

  • By Deanna on 08-07-16

Terrible

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-17-16

Bad content badly narrated. A torturous listen. Not recommended. Wish I had not purchased this.

0 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Mysteries of Modern Physics: Time

  • By: Sean Carroll, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Sean Carroll
  • Length: 12 hrs and 17 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,355
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,219
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,199

Time rules our lives, woven into the very fabric of the universe-from the rising and setting of the sun to the cycles of nature, the thought processes in our brains, and the biorhythms in our day. Nothing so pervades our existence and yet is so difficult to explain. But now, in a series of 24 riveting lectures, you can grasp exactly why - as you take a mind-expanding journey through the past, present, and future, guided by a noted author and scientist.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Get From Eternity to Here instead

  • By Michael on 07-24-13

Not terrible but wasn't great

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-21-16

Would you try another book from The Great Courses and Sean Carroll and/or Professor Sean Carroll?

I've listened to The Higgs Boson and Beyond which was pretty good. I might try other books from Prof. Carroll but I'm not sure.

Were the concepts of this book easy to follow, or were they too technical?

Easy to follow concepts, but very repetitive.

How could the performance have been better?

Some things that are said are not quite correct, but are presented as facts. The author repeats things frequently, even if they are basic facts that don't bear covering. It is as if the book didn't have enough material so there is a lot of filling in with useless content.

Was Mysteries of Modern Physics: Time worth the listening time?

I'm not sure it was worth the listening time. There are a few valuable concepts, and the topic seems like it should be quite interesting, but usually it takes 15 minutes to cover a 3 minute concept so it depends on whether or not you are patient enough.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Killing the Rising Sun

  • How America Vanquished World War II Japan
  • By: Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard
  • Narrated by: Robert Petkoff, Bill O'Reilly
  • Length: 9 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 8,534
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 7,642
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 7,602

Autumn 1944. World War II is nearly over in Europe but is escalating in the Pacific, where American soldiers face an opponent who will go to any length to avoid defeat. The Japanese army follows the samurai code of Bushido, stipulating that surrender is a form of dishonor. Killing the Rising Sun takes listeners to the bloody tropical-island battlefields of Peleliu and Iwo Jima and to the embattled Philippines, where General Douglas MacArthur has made a triumphant return and is plotting a full-scale invasion of Japan.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Bill O'Reilly paints an amazing picture.

  • By Carmen Ohio on 07-16-17

Unique viewpoint, well told

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-21-16

What did you love best about Killing the Rising Sun?

I'm quite familiar with events of WW2 yet this book gave me some information I hadn't heard before. I really liked the viewpoint shown from several different angles throughout this phase of the war, including detailed discussion about creating and deciding to drop the atomic bomb. Very well done.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Nature of Matter: Understanding the Physical World

  • By: David W. Ball, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: David W. Ball
  • Length: 12 hrs and 5 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 411
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 361
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 354

In the 24 engaging lectures of The Nature of Matter, no scientific background is needed to appreciate such miracles of everyday life as a bouncing rubber ball or water's astonishing power to dissolve. Moreover, the study of matter has led directly to such inventions as semiconductor circuits for computers, new fabrics for clothes, and powerful adhesives for medicine and industry.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • 95% Chemistry, 5% Physics

  • By Matt on 09-06-16

Great for a technical audience

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-21-16

What made the experience of listening to The Nature of Matter: Understanding the Physical World the most enjoyable?

The book covered a very wide variety of chemistry subjects, from sub-atomic, atomic, and molecular interactions to the science of building materials, foods, dyes, aerospace materials, and more. Very educational and well organized. Parts of it were somewhat technical: at least an introductory college level. If you think a chapter is slightly dry, just wait for the later chapters.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Power of Habit

  • Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business
  • By: Charles Duhigg
  • Narrated by: Mike Chamberlain
  • Length: 10 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 53,232
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46,056
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 45,812

In The Power of Habit, award-winning business reporter Charles Duhigg takes us to the thrilling edge of scientific discoveries that explain why habits exist and how they can be changed. Distilling vast amounts of information into engrossing narratives that take us from the boardrooms of Procter & Gamble to the sidelines of the NFL to the front lines of the civil rights movement, Duhigg presents a whole new understanding of human nature and its potential.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good, but....

  • By Kimmi on 03-03-12

Ok for alcoholics

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-08-16

The author hypes Alcoholics Anonymous. If you aren't alcoholic the book has little appeal. AA is a cult of religion, not for everyone.

  • The Elegant Universe

  • Superstrings, Hidden Dimensions, and the Quest for the Ultimate Theory
  • By: Brian Greene
  • Narrated by: Erik Davies
  • Length: 15 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,357
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,004
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 999

In a rare blend of scientific insight and writing as elegant as the theories it explains, one of the world's leading string theorists, peels away the layers of mystery surrounding string theory to reveal a universe that consists of 11 dimensions where the fabric of space tears and repairs itself, and all matter-from the smallest quarks to the most gargantuan supernovas-is generated by the vibrations of microscopically tiny loops of energy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Well Written, Good Narration

  • By Verena on 06-12-09

First half great

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-24-16

The discussion of special and general relativity and quantum theory makes this book worth listening to or reading. When it gets into string theory it becomes tedious and bogs down but I am guessing that is the state of string theory research.

The book did not convince me that string theory is more than a concoction to avoid mathematical conundrums of the standard model. I'm frankly amazed that physicists have delved so far into supposition, but perhaps there is nowhere else to go.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful