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  • Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous

  • By: George Berkeley
  • Narrated by: Ray Childs
  • Length: 4 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 14
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 13

Berkeley uses the Socratic mode of inquiry in Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous to question fundamental beliefs about knowledge and reality. These dialogues are between Hylas (whose name is derived from the ancient Greek word for matter) and Philonous, whose name means "lover of mind". The new physical sciences developed in the 17th century supported the materialism proposed by Thomas Hobbes and several other philosophers.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Ray Childs at it again

  • By Aleksander on 05-07-17

Nonsensical argument

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-17-18

Reasoning was naive and convoluted. While fundamentally different from the thoughts of Rousseau, the arguments are similarly flawed.

  • A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge

  • By: George Berkeley
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Cowley
  • Length: 3 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 23
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 18
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 19

First published in 1710, George Berkeley's A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge is a seminal contribution to Empiricist philosophy. Making the bold assertion that the physical world consists only of ideas and thus does not exist outside the mind, this work establishes Berkeley as the founder of the immaterialist school of thought. A major influence on such later philosophers as David Hume and Immanuel Kant, Berkeley's ideas have played a role in such diverse fields as mathematics and metaphysics and continue to spark debate today.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Locke had better treatment - but still read

  • By Todd on 10-03-18

Locke had better treatment - but still read

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-03-18

Locke had a more thoughtful and analytical discussion than Berkeley and Hume. Not just due to length.

  • On the Social Contract

  • By: Jean-Jacques Rousseau
  • Narrated by: Erik Sandval
  • Length: 5 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 110
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 81
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 81

On the Social Contract's appeal and influence has been wide-ranging and continuous. It has been called an encomium to democracy and, at the same time, a blueprint for totalitarianism. Individualists, collectivists, anarchists, and socialists have all taken courage from Rousseau's controversial masterpiece.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Old and Tired

  • By Amazon Customer on 12-13-18

Flawed concepts

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-05-18

Rousseau is factually incorrect regarding certain aspects of Roman society / culture. Anthropologists have discredited many of his assertions.

0 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • A Discourse Upon the Origin and the Foundation of the Inequality Among Mankind

  • By: Jean-Jacques Rousseau
  • Narrated by: Alan Sklar
  • Length: 3 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 25
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 20

Discourse on the Origin and Basis of Inequality Among Men was written in response to a competition run by the Academy of Dijon answering the prompt: What is the origin of inequality among men, and whether such inequality is authorized by natural law? Rousseau puts forth the concept of two types of inequity: natural/physical and moral/political. He focuses on moral inequality and its link to power and wealth. He also covers the areas of self-love, compassion for others, and free-agency.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Flawed concepts

  • By Todd on 03-30-18

Flawed concepts

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-30-18

Anthropologists have disproved most assertions posited by Rousseau. This is not to say all. His assertions about early human mother-child bond are offensive.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Reflections on the Revolution in France

  • By: Edmund Burke
  • Narrated by: Bernard Mayes
  • Length: 11 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 66
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 58
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 54

This famous treatise began as a letter to a young French friend who asked Edmund Burke’s opinion on whether France’s new ruling class would succeed in creating a better order. Doubtless the friend expected a favorable reply, but Burke was suspicious of certain tendencies of the Revolution from the start and perceived that the revolutionaries were actually subverting the true "social order". Blending history with principle and graceful imagery with profound practical maxims, this book is one of the most influential political treatises in the history of the world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A good historical perspective

  • By CMC on 08-30-14

Excellent contemporary observations

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-07-18

Thoughtful commentary. The author compares the British revolutions (not U.S.) with the French revolution. A revolution can respect the law. Or, a revolution can have mob rule.o