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SuZieCoyote

  • 15
  • reviews
  • 69
  • helpful votes
  • 32
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  • Girls & Boys

  • By: Dennis Kelly
  • Narrated by: Carey Mulligan
  • Length: 1 hr and 46 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,292
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,917
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,874

A pulse-pounding new play from Tony Award-winning® playwright Dennis Kelly takes you on a journey that is at once hilarious, gripping, and heartbreaking. This world-premiere production starring Carey Mulligan (The Great Gatsby, An Education) is available exclusively on Audible after a celebrated run at the Royal Court Theatre in London and off-Broadway at the Minetta Lane Theatre. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I have never heard a story performed so well.

  • By Erin Reeve on 07-05-18

Devastating

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-06-18

I didn't know anything about this story before I listened to it. It just looked interesting and Audible offered me a free version. I won't spoil it here, but this....every woman should hear this story.

  • Rendezvous with Oblivion

  • Reports from a Sinking Society
  • By: Thomas Frank
  • Narrated by: Thomas Frank
  • Length: 6 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 98
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 82
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 77

What does a middle-class democracy look like when it comes apart? When, after 40 years of economic triumph, America’s winners persuade themselves that they owe nothing to the rest of the country? Rendezvous with Oblivion is a collection of interlocking essays examining how inequality has manifested itself in our cities, in our jobs, in the way we travel - and of course in our politics, where in 2016, millions of anxious ordinary people rallied to the presidential campaign of a billionaire who meant them no good.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Major Depressive if it Wasn't so Witty.

  • By Christopher on 07-04-18

The Message Was Good, but Disingenuous

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-10-18

The book has an important message. The liberals have largely abandoned their roots and have become corrupt and, more to the point, out of touch with those they pretend to serve. All this is true, but the delivery was so bombastic and full of hyperbole that it put me off. The other thing that put me off was his defense of people in small towns bemoaning that the carpet has been pulled out from under them. He maintains they didn't vote Trump/Republican because they are racist and sexist, but because they are losing their way of life. What makes their lives in small towns more important than life for those of us in cities? I, personally, have had to pull up roots many times to find work to support my family. So have most of my friends. We don't sit around and moan that it was the "librals" or even the "conservatives," that did this to us. Almost everyone I know has had to move for work. People in rural areas or small towns often believe they are special and don't have to do what humans have done for millennia and go find food/work where it is available. The author refuses to see this. They are all victims of us elite, educated folk in his mind. While I agree with 80% of the book's premise (that liberals/Democrats have lost their way), I have a real problem giving a pass to the racism, sexism, tribalism and downright mean-spiritedness of the Trump movement and its adherents. I grew up in Kansas, and I know the mindset I grew up with. They support a racist message because there is a racist core to their anger. They blame "the other" because things aren't to their liking. The author refused to admit this sentiment exists and it degrades the quality of his book.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Tribe

  • On Homecoming and Belonging
  • By: Sebastian Junger
  • Narrated by: Sebastian Junger
  • Length: 2 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,450
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,638
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,601

Decades before the American Revolution, Benjamin Franklin lamented that English settlers were constantly fleeing over to the Indians - but Indians almost never did the same. Tribal society has been exerting an almost gravitational pull on Westerners for hundreds of years, and the reason lies deep in our evolutionary past as a communal species. The most recent example of that attraction is combat veterans who come home to find themselves missing the incredibly intimate bonds of platoon life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The most profound book on the subject

  • By joseph on 05-26-16

A good, though short, read.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-02-18

I liked this book because it was personal, and it addressed issues that are timely and important. The fact than an acquaintance, a PHD psychologist, sniffed and said (without reading it), "Junger isn't qualified to make statements about PTSD," made me like it even more. It addresses the real feelings of real men in real situations. As a former military member myself, I understand the points he is trying to make about connection, honor, and hardship, things missing in today's world. We've been conditioned to think of "tribalism" in a bad light (and without an uplifting sense of tribe, we do get destructive tribal behaviors, such as racism.) Junger shows that tribes can be sources of meaning inhuman lives.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Woken Furies

  • By: Richard K. Morgan
  • Narrated by: William Dufris
  • Length: 22 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,832
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 1,991
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,966

Richard K. Morgan has received widespread praise for his astounding 25th-century novels featuring Takeshi Kovacs, and has established a growing legion of fans. Mixing classic noir sensibilities with a searing futuristic vision of an age when death is nearly meaningless, Morgan returns to his saga of betrayal, mystery, and revenge, as Takeshi Kovacs, in one fatal moment, joins forces with a mysterious woman who may have the power to shatter Harlan's World forever.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • "On Harlan's World...

  • By Danyal on 09-29-08

Silly Narration.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-09-18

I enjoyed Altered Carbon. The concept was fascinating and the story fine. Broken Angels was a riff on the same thing - offered very little that was new, but was an ok story. Narration on Broken Angels started to degrade the story, though. This third book was so badly narrated, it has been difficult for me to listen. The hard-nosed detective talk was just plain silly and I'm not sure what the whole "echo chamber" segments were supposed to achieve. Whatever the goal, they fell flat. Again, the story was ok, a bit of interest around the Quell story line, but not much new was offered up.

  • Lost Connections

  • Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression - and the Unexpected Solutions
  • By: Johann Hari
  • Narrated by: Johann Hari
  • Length: 9 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,049
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,881
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,875

From the New York Times best-selling author of Chasing the Scream, a radically new way of thinking about depression and anxiety. What really causes depression and anxiety - and how can we really solve them?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Are we turning the corner....

  • By jaga on 06-07-18

Thoughtful and Considered

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-08-18

The book was thoughtful and considered. The author may not have had a multitude of scientific facts and figures, but he did do considerable research and consult experts in the field who were willing to honestly talk about the problem with our current model of treating depression. He also got them to talk about the influence of the pharmaceutical industry in the growing crisis of depression in the western world and our collective failure to address the root problems because we aren't even allowed to look by this monopolistic industry. He told his own story, with great courage, in his own way. It resonated with me. I know so many deeply depressed people, especially among the young, and so many people who move in and out of depression. We're told this is simply "bad brain chemistry." How did suddenly so many of us get "bad brain chemistry?" The emperor is indeed, naked. Our religious and economic systems are destructive to the human psyche. I notice that negative reviews on the book seem to universally be knee jerk reactions from conservative-minded individuals who can't seem to wrap their heads around the fact that the growing depression crisis could have anything to do with our economic system, or our 2000 year old, Stone Age view of the Deity, nor can they see any need to change any of this. Yet, one definition of "crazy" has always been doing the same things over and over again, hoping for different results. Negative reviews also came also from religiously-minded people who were disappointed that the author didn't arrive at God being the solution and one or two negative reviews from people who felt the anti-depressants really were helping them. While there may be individuals who believe they have been helped, globally the problem is getting worse, not better. This is a great, heartfelt, book by someone who has experienced depression, got off the drugs, and thought long and hard about why they don't seem to be working.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Sh*tshow!

  • The Country's Collapsing . . . and the Ratings Are Great
  • By: Charlie LeDuff
  • Narrated by: Charlie LeDuff
  • Length: 7 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 215
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 196
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 194

A daring, firsthand, and utterly-unscripted account of crisis in America, from Ferguson to Flint to Cliven Bundy's ranch to Donald Trump's unstoppable campaign for President - at every turn, Pulitzer-prize winner and best-selling author of Detroit: An American Autopsy, Charlie LeDuff was there.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Examinations of the aftermath from the scene

  • By josh on 05-23-18

Official Credentials!!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-21-18

This was a very moving book. Charlie LeDuff has brought the American story of today to light in a profoundly honest book. It is entertaining, heartbreaking and uplifting, all at the same time. One doesn't have to agree with him on every point to see that the man cares deeply about this country and its people. I tend progressive, and have been dismissive of the Trump supporters. It is easy to see Trump as a con and his supporters as often dupes, yet Charlie's book illustrates that the truth is far more complex then simply, "Trump supporters are stupid racists." Some are, yes, but not all or even most. Our middle class is collapsing and with it our nation. Is it racist when a man who works in construction becomes angry that he can no longer feed his family because illegal immigrants will work for half or a third of what it takes to make a decent life? The man may blame the wrong person or group for the situation, but he and his family are still hurting. It IS a SH*tshow out there, and people chose Trump because the other choices were business as usual -full of policies that have abandoned large swaths of our country, regardless of ethnicity, in favor of Wall Street and corporate elites. I read many books on the topic of "Why, oh, why, did so many vote for an obvious buffoon?" and the apologists never swayed me from seeing his supporters as fellow buffoons." But, LeDuff's book shows the "us" in all this, how our divisions are hurting most of us, while favoring the usual suspects. He shines a light on the corruption that is nether left, nor right, but simply endemic. When people's lives are crashing down around them, and they become desperate, is it any wonder they find hope outside the usual channels that are strangling them? At least Trump showed up and talked to these people during the election. Charlie got it mostly right.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Political Order and Political Decay

  • From the Industrial Revolution to the Globalization of Democracy
  • By: Francis Fukuyama
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis
  • Length: 24 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,291
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,120
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,112

Fukuyama examines the effects of corruption on governance, and why some societies have been successful at rooting it out. He explores the different legacies of colonialism in Latin America, Africa, and Asia, and offers a clear-eyed account of why some regions have thrived and developed more quickly than others. And he boldly reckons with the future of democracy in the face of a rising global middle class and entrenched political paralysis in the West.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Understanding our place thru Poly Sci

  • By Gary on 12-29-14

Excellent historical overview of how political structures develop and decay.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-24-18

Not for light listening. Very complex and detailed. Can change one’s thinking on issues. Recommend.

  • 12 Rules for Life

  • An Antidote to Chaos
  • By: Jordan B. Peterson, Norman Doidge MD - foreword
  • Narrated by: Jordan B. Peterson
  • Length: 15 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29,741
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26,836
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26,602

What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson's answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research. Humorous, surprising, and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alone, what terrible fate awaits those who criticize too easily, and why you should always pet a cat when you meet one on the street.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not Your Average 'Self Help' Book

  • By LadyReadsAlot on 06-04-18

Where to start with this mess of a book.....

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-14-18

I am disappointed I spent money and time on this book. Though I tend progressive, I am not hard left, and I resonate with conservatives when they are logical and careful in their thinking. They are not wrong about many things. Unfortunately, this book is neither logical nor careful. It is little more than Sunday-school level exhortations based around the same tired sexist, eurocentric drivel that fills the propaganda writings of other right wing pundits, though Peterson does write better than most of them. The author states personal biases, tries to tie them to "nature," and ignores any evidence that points to different conclusions. For example, he says that it has been men that have built everything in the world - cities, buildings, etc. This is absolute nonsense. The building of civilization was a joint effort between men and women, but in a world where women did not get the credit and did not write the history, women's contributions were just not logged. In much of the world today, for example, it is the females who make the mud and clay bricks and build the shelters, as well as holding their civilizations together. It may please a certain demographic to beat their chests and place themselves above the female half of humanity, and I see a lot of those types here, but that doesn't make it true. Women were likely responsible for development of textiles, pottery and other critical civilized advancements. Civilization means rejecting violence and destruction for their own sake, and this rejection is not typically what one thinks of when thinking about males fighting for dominance. War is a prototypical male endeavor and it is destructiveness writ large. Peterson doesn't talk too much about this, of course, though he does mention war as an evil. Out of one side of the mouth, he spouts evolution and nature as reasons sticking with the social structures we know (they got us here, right?), however damaging those structures are to all but his favored (but not directly articulated) demographic. Out of the other side of his mouth he says things like it is the female who chooses the male for reproduction and goes on about males being terrified of being reproductively rejected. He neglects to mention that in most of the world today, and throughout human history, women often have had little choice about who they are assigned as a mate. They are married off without their consent, often into the harems of older men, who in no way are reproductively superior to the younger men the women would select, had they choice in the matter. And as for those who DO have the choice, said choice is a very new phenomenon, historically. So, human social structure, then, using Peterson's own logic, has been perverted by forcing females to specific males, which is, in essence, rape. However you look at it, it hasn't been a case of women choosing to reject "inferior" males. The conservative opinion that Peterson seems to hold is that since this is our past and has been going on a long time, it must the best thing for us, a position he holds on most every issue. Peterson is certainly passionate about his nonsense. He spends a huge amount of time, for example, making the case that humans don't take their medications properly because we "hate ourselves" and then goes on a prescriptive behaviors rant to counter our supposed self-loathing. That is drivel. The reasons we don't take our medications are because we sometimes forget, or get busy, or endure debilitating side effects, or see no results from the money we spend. To say people don't take their meds because they are "disgusted" with themselves is downright silly. This doesn't stop Peterson from spending pages going on about it. I gave him two stars because his child-raising advice is actually quite good as well as is his advice to take care of oneself. But these things are common sense and don't come from any great insights. He's probably a pretty nice man, though unable to break out of a mundane and uncreative mindset. Nobody really knows what humans are....not really. We know we are different than the animals. Our religions tell us we are spiritual beings in physical bodies, yet Peterson's view seems to be that he knows us, we're animals and we must have societal mores built on animal behaviors. Further, his endless religious rantings are, according to at least one respected bishop, Robert Barron, completely devoid of theological honesty. I am not religious, so I can't weigh in here, but he does read all sorts of things into scripture that just aren't there, such as God not finding Cain's sacrifice equal to Abel's due to Cain "not putting his heart into it." Some people do speculate that Cain's sacrifice was lower quality, but there is absolutely nothing to back up that statement. He further goes on to describe Cain's overall sinful nature and behaviors in great detail, when other than the killing of his brother, details are not provided, except of course by Peterson who claims to know the heart of Cain. It's not in the scripture anywhere. In another example, Peterson credits Christianity for ending slavery and while many good Christians (the abolitionists) were against slavery, just as many, if not more, Christians used biblical reasoning to justify slavery and fight against abolition, much as they use the same reasoning today to discriminate against gay people and repress females. Slavery was abolished in many non-Christian nations long before being abolished in the Christian US These are just a few examples. The book is full of this stuff. Peterson spouts all sorts of opinion, waves his hands at evolution and nature, and ignores anything that doesn't suit him.

  • Broken Angels

  • By: Richard K. Morgan
  • Narrated by: Todd McLaren
  • Length: 16 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,290
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,110
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,120

Cynical, quick-on-the-trigger Takeshi Kovacs, the ex-U.N. envoy turned private eye, has changed careers, and bodies, once more, trading sleuthing for soldiering as a warrior-for-hire and helping a far-flung planet's government put down a bloody revolution.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Gritty, hard-boiled space action

  • By Ryan on 08-23-14

A Good Listen

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-01-18

A slightly flawed, but very fun listen. The characters are interesting, and the premise is interesting. I'm not particular fond of detective-type stories, but I love sci-fi and the book is a bit of both. Occasional "deus ex machina" high tech saves seem a little too "magic" to suit me, but the story and the environment are quite creative. The female characters are great; much different than what most detective stories (or sci-fi) serve up. They are tough and smart. What really makes this a great listen, though, is that the narration is excellent. Differing voices, females that aren't just shrill and girly, the excitement in his voice - all these things make the story a bit more compelling and immediate than it might otherwise have been. Most readers of Broken Angels will have read Altered Carbon already and so know these books are very, very violent. This one dips into porn several times as well, often for pages at a time. Doesn't bother me, but doesn't pull me, either. The male reader/listener might enjoy those parts more than I did. I just sort of rolled my eyes. I would recommend this book; I find Richard Morgan creative and overall a very good writer. I look forward to future books.

  • The Power

  • By: Naomi Alderman
  • Narrated by: Adjoa Andoh
  • Length: 12 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,229
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,982
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,972

In The Power, the world is a recognizable place: There's a rich Nigerian boy who lounges around the family pool; a foster kid whose religious parents hide their true nature; an ambitious American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. But then a vital new force takes root and flourishes, causing their lives to converge with devastating effect. Teenage girls now have immense physical power - they can cause agonizing pain and even death. And, with this small twist of nature, the world drastically resets.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Beginning pulls you in, but end doesn't hold up

  • By Maren M. on 08-06-18

Faulty Premise

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-03-17

It was (or could have been) a good story, but what it devolved to was channeling the worst fears of the whiny MRA set, who believe that women, if empowered, will turn around and do to them what they've been doing to us for all of recorded history. I don't buy it. Some women would be jerks if they had physical power over men, and there would be some retaliation in play, but not to the degree it has been happening to us all these centuries. Honestly, women roaming around in packs, gang-raping men? Nah. It isn't just a case of they'd do it "because they can" as the author assumes. There are examples of women in power who are tyrants and there are examples of women in power who are not - mostly, they are not. Women, when empowered, make excellent and fair executives, bosses, and professionals. Empowered women actually create the best societies. The author believes that women, empowered, would simply devolve into packs of wolves. I don't buy it. That said, the story and characters were interesting and the reading was well-done.

52 of 68 people found this review helpful