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Kamel

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  • 19
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  • 8
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  • The Power of Vulnerability

  • Teachings of Authenticity, Connection, and Courage
  • By: Brené Brown PhD
  • Narrated by: Brené Brown
  • Length: 6 hrs and 30 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 25,681
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 22,856
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 22,593

On The Power of Vulnerability, Dr. Brown offers an invitation and a promise - that when we dare to drop the armor that protects us from feeling vulnerable, we open ourselves to the experiences that bring purpose and meaning to our lives. Here she dispels the cultural myth that vulnerability is weakness and reveals that it is, in truth, our most accurate measure of courage.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The audio makes all the difference.

  • By Sadie on 09-14-13

This isn't an audio book, but much more

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-19

# The secret sauce is the performance

I'm a large consumer of audio books, video courses, etc. The experience that came from this recording surpassed those and became something else entirely. In this book, Brene is speaking to what feels like a very small audience which Brene seems to be very comfortable around. This really comes through in the recording and feels like you're a part of a small group of people who the author truly cares about. The performance is something I've just never encountered before, including in all of the other Brene Brown audio books I've listened to. They are quite good, but this one is something special. I normally listen to videos/books at much faster than 1x speed depending on the complexity (typically around 1.5x-3x, her other books I listen to at 1.65x for reference) but in this case I never changed it away from 1x as i felt it would have somehow kept me from getting the full enjoyment out of it.

# This is probably the best "first book" for Brene Brown

I've listened to many of Brene Brown's books, and she is certainly guilty of repeating lessons in them as I've seen other reviewers complain about. This is a great first book of hers because she takes the time and care to explain some of the larger concepts - like what exactly she means when she says she is a shame researcher. I would argue that Brene does not repeat stories in the same context, but I think I understand where she is coming from because her books build off of one another like a curriculum so if she did not summarize past books you wouldn't be able to just pick up any of her books. This made knowing the best order to read them in challenging for me, so if I had to do it over I would have listened to this one first - with one consideration. The gifts of imperfection was not narrated by Brene and the other books I've listened to by her were, so I almost believe it might be best to listen to that book first as you will find it difficult to engage in once you've heard the books narrated by the author.

# Like all of Brene's books, this is life changing

I've got a long way to go before I've truly become the "whole-hearted" person Brene has made me aspire to be, but I truly believe her teachings - and particularly those found in this book - have been life changing for me. She makes me reflect on things I do - behaviors I have - ways I interact - which I don't even notice I do until she gently and lovingly points them out. In particular, the whole dialog about when someone I love shares something hurtful that happened to them. I want to go in to "fix it" mode, where I immediately start sounding off advice, but as she points out that isn't how you show up. You can't truly lend the empathy you need to in those situations without first being vulnerable yourself. Ouch, that hurts because it hits home, a shot straight to the heart. My loved ones deserve to be able to come to me about tough situations without me shaming them. What's worse is I didn't even recognize that's what "mr fix it" _actually_ is, a vessel through which shame flows. These are my own words, rendered by the teachings in the book, but that is what I got out of it.

  • Extraordinary Leadership

  • By: Robin Sharma
  • Narrated by: uncredited
  • Length: 1 hr and 6 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,905
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,830
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,795

In a constantly changing, hyper-competitive world, leadership is more important than ever. Yet few people have what it takes to inspire, develop, and guide others. In this presentation, Robin Sharma shares the leadership lessons that he gives to clients such as Nike, Microsoft, and NASA.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Nice Listen!

  • By Sami Bunia on 09-17-12

free, but not worth the cost

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-26-18

the author seems very insecure by continuing to repeat his credentials and basic things like the importance of wanting to change. know your audience, anyone who is reading this is likely open to change and taking that a step further to seek it out.

I didn't listen to all of it, but got about 25% of the way through yet found nothing of value. waste of time.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Crazy Love (Revised and Updated)

  • Overwhelmed by a Relentless God
  • By: Francis Chan
  • Narrated by: Francis Chan
  • Length: 4 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 2,297
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,982
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,974

The God of the universe - the Creator of nitrogen and pine needles, galaxies and E-minor - loves us with a radical, unconditional, self-sacrificing love. And what is our typical response? We go to church, sing songs, and try not to cuss. Are you hungry for an authentic faith that addresses the problems of our world with tangible, even radical, solutions? God is calling you to a passionate love relationship with Himself. Because the answer to religious complacency isn’t working harder at a list of do's and don'ts - it's falling in love with God.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Blessing

  • By Red on 11-02-13

Good book but makes me sleep

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-25-18

I love Francis Chan and his message in this book. It is a bit short and doesn't really offer any profound new ideas but helps reorient Christians to what really matters.

That said, while I really enjoy a book read by the author never have I found an audiobook quite so capable of putting me to sleep. something about his voice that just does me in. I basically never listen to books at 1x speed, so it isn't the pace. I generally like listening to this at 2x speed (typical for me), but still can't manage more than half of a chapter before I'm nodding off.

  • Ego Is the Enemy

  • By: Ryan Holiday
  • Narrated by: Ryan Holiday
  • Length: 6 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,406
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,541
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,488

"While the history books are filled with tales of obsessive visionary geniuses who remade the world in their images with sheer, almost irrational force, I've found that history is also made by individuals who fought their egos at every turn, who eschewed the spotlight, and who put their higher goals above their desire for recognition." (From the prologue)

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good content, tedious performance

  • By Jefferson Lam on 07-28-16

A cautionary tale of rising too fast

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-25-18

Intuitively, I knew rising to power/wealth too fast was detrimental, but I couldn't put my finger on why. The author explains these dangers and others succinctly. As an added bonus, it also helped me discern the difference between ego and confidence something I struggle with due to not learning in my childhood. I have been on the receiving end of the roller coaster that is rising too fast, and I'm glad I have this book to remind me to keep my ego in check before I find myself at the inevitable outcome that comes from having an out of control ego.

  • Healing from Hidden Abuse

  • A Journey Through the Stages of Recovery from Psychological Abuse
  • By: Shannon Thomas LCSW
  • Narrated by: Wendy Tremont King
  • Length: 6 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 406
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 341
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 334

Within every community, toxic people can be found hiding in families, couples, companies, and places of worship. The cryptic nature of psychological abuse involves repetitious mind games played by one individual or a group of people. Psychological abuse leaves no bruises. There are no broken bones. There are no holes in the walls. The bruises, brokenness, and holes are held tightly within the target of the abuse.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Will change your life

  • By cjg on 07-09-17

Proceed with caution

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-17-18

The reviews were promising, but I sadly believe the reviewers are people not unlike myself - yearning for vindication and to be understood. This book does well to be compassionate towards the reader, but comes up short in the advice department.

The book feels like an infomercial, continually repeating all of the wonderful things it's about to talk about rather than getting in to the material. I would go as far as to say there is nothing of any value until you get 10 minutes in to the 4th chapter. Once you get there the author's advice seems mostly sound, particularly about the importance of setting boundaries and not allowing future abuse, but there is a very important omission.

*Disclaimer: I couldn't stomach getting through the entire book and I was struggling to remain awake for the 11 chapters I did get through, so perhaps later in the book she does give the advice I'm about to give. If that is the case, however, I would find the author to be inconsistent at best and disingenuous at worst.

All of that is forgivable and would not have impacted my rating, but what I can not believe is the attitude of the author towards the abuser. She consistently and habitually insists that abusers are performing their abuse intentionally. Her tone implies that all abusers have precisely calculated how to best destroy you and can never be forgiven for that.

Please understand that I am not in any way claiming that abusers are innocent loving people. What I AM saying is that it is -common- but not -guaranteed- that abusers do not realize they are being abusive. Abusers often truly believe they aren't doing anything wrong. Psychological abuse is the unfortunate manifestation of a psychological disorder. People do not chose to have a mental disorder no more than they choose to be the recipient of abuse.

I was emotionally abused for the first 15 years of my life, but now at the age of 33 I have overcome it and am a very successful person. I will never be fully healed from it. My scars will never go away and I'll never be the person I would have otherwise become, but I am here to say healing is within reach no matter how far out of reach it may seem right now.

Healing takes lots of time, and I would argue that it never actually reaches any kind of finish line but most importantly proper healing requires good solid advice. Some of the advice required to heal can be very difficult to follow. Where this book is reckless is I know from experience that one of the most critical steps to recovery is forgiveness of the abuser. The author of this book seems to lead the reader further down the path of unforgiveness which is contrary to healing.

As far out of reach as forgiveness may seem for you, please understand I am not insisting you go to the abuser and tell them you forgive them. Nor am I saying they will ever ask for or even want forgiveness. Forgiveness is a personal and internal thing. To not forgive is to not let go, and it keeps you a prisoner to the abuse. You must forgive to be released from this prison and be able to move on with your life, that is critical.

In my particular case, my father was a narcissistic abuser. He took my childhood from me with mind games, making me feel worthless and undeserving of anything. He made me feel like I was lazy and would never be good enough for anyone or anything. I had trouble getting a job because I didn't have any confidence in myself. To this day, I still struggle with how to be confident because I did not ever learn what that was like as a kid. The only thing my father demonstrated was how to have a massive ego and never accept blame for anything.

After many years of agonizing recovery I actually learned that the true underlying motivation was my father wanted me to have a better life than he had. He truly believed that treating me like that was going to do some good for me. Mental illness is a strange thing indeed, and only now can I find it within me to understand and even feel compassion for him being the victim of a mental disorder.

Please know, this doesn't mean I agree with what he did or would for a moment allow it to happen again. It is important, however, that I unravel the real truths so that I can make as much sense of it as I can for the purpose of my own healing.

I say all of this because as someone who has reached the "mostly healed" end of this journey I felt obligated to undo some of the potential harm done by perpetuating hatred towards your abuser. Doing this gives the abuser and the abuse power, your goal needs to be taking the power completely away from them and regaining control of your own life.

Sorry for the long review, if it helps even one person it will have been worth my effort.

19 of 22 people found this review helpful

  • A Tale of Three Kings

  • By: Gene Edwards
  • Narrated by: Paul Michael
  • Length: 1 hr and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 597
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 528
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 527

This modern classic will bring light, clarity, and comfort to the brokenhearted. Many Christians have experienced pain, loss, and heartache at the hands of other believers. To those believers, this compelling story offers comfort, healing and hope. Christian leaders and directors of religious movements throughout the world have recommended this simple, powerful, and beautiful story to their members and staff. You will want to join these other people who have been profoundly touched by this incomparable story.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beauty of Ashes

  • By mykell althen on 01-13-16

Good all-around

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-15-18

Good story, good pacing, good narrator. Was fairly short, but very impactful. Well written with good use of vocabulary.