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Paul

Pitman, NJ, United States
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  • Black Ops

  • Expeditionary Force, Book 4
  • By: Craig Alanson
  • Narrated by: R. C. Bray
  • Length: 16 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 20,473
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 19,242
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,166

The elite crew of the pirate ship UNS Flying Dutchman had a simple mission: determining whether the Thuranin are sending another starship to Earth. Along the way, they became sidetracked by securing a future for the UNEF troops on the planet Paradise. When asked whether Earth was now safe, their ancient alien AI responded "Not so much"...now they have to deal with the consequences.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not as good as the first three

  • By Anonymous User on 10-16-17

Good for a series

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-17

The fourth book in this series is good, and there are some unexpected twists that keep it fresh, but there is a lot of "more of the same." Alamein has written himself into a corner since the crew can't reveal there existence to any other aliens. Therefore there is little direct interaction between humans and aliens. My favorite parts about Columbus Day, and Trouble on Paradise were learning about the different cultures and watching them interact. The charecter development is also lagging the Hans is more friendly and Skippy more tolerant.
Another problem is that because the existence of human pirates can't be revealed, all of their missions must succeed flawlessly despite complications. This removes the elament of suspense and strains credulity,. The magic beer can"can and does almost everything. It's the same problem writers face with super man, or ST Tricorders. I hope in the next book the humans get some alien allies, even if they are primitively. Otherwise this 12 book series may not be sustainable. At present, this was a good read and I'm cautiously opptamistic about the next book. Alan son has to expand his universe if he wants us to keep playing in it. Don't let me down!

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Monster 1983

  • An Audible Original Drama
  • By: Ivar Leon Menger, Anette Strohmeyer, Raimon Weber
  • Narrated by: Marc Warren, Callum Blue, Anastasia Griffith, and others
  • Length: 7 hrs and 18 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 310
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 292
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 290

Oregon, summer 1983. A series of mysterious deaths shakes the coastal town of Harmony Bay from its peaceful sleep. Shortly after the death of his wife, Sheriff Cody is called upon to investigate numerous murders which all exhibit strange puncture wounds. Cody and his team expect the murders are committed by a serial killer, but it soon becomes clear something more sinister lurks behind this idyllic town, which becomes his worst nightmare.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Not worth a credit

  • By Timothy C. Branan on 11-02-16

Wish it weren't so but it's terrible

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-04-17

I was really hoping this would be good but it was not period. Here are just a few of its main problems. (The only good thing was the music and voice acting quality)
1. Story was long, too complex, and completely unresolved. Yes sometimes cliffhangers can be very good, but this story literally does not resolve, nor explain anything.
2. Direction, there are way too many characters for a simple radio drama. loses track of who is who. This problem is complicated by the way the world storyline is cut into another storyline and then into another story line and then back again as if it were a movie.
3. Obviously written by a foreigner, Though the actors have great skill in good American accents, The fact that the flashlight is referred to as a "torch," a warm day is described as 29 degrees, and "eh" and "yall" are used in the same sentence are really distracting. It terns out the script is translated and they did.a poor job.
4. Way too many obvious 80s references for the Stalgia purposes.
5. Finally though this book almost requires a sequel, they never made a sequel in English.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Columbus Day

  • Expeditionary Force, Book 1
  • By: Craig Alanson
  • Narrated by: R.C. Bray
  • Length: 16 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26,785
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 25,483
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25,427

The Ruhar hit us on Columbus Day. There we were, innocently drifting along the cosmos on our little blue marble, like the Native Americans in 1492. Over the horizon came ships of a technologically advanced, aggressive culture, and BAM! There went the good old days, when humans got killed only by each other. So, Columbus Day. It fits. When the morning sky twinkled again, this time with Kristang starships jumping in to hammer the Ruhar, we thought we were saved.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sci Fi I didn't know I wanted

  • By Gary Glenn on 06-27-17

Good fun

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-01-17

Good space drama. Complex it interesting universe with very different types of aliens. But The story sometimes gets a little ridiculous with the smart-ass beer can shaped A.I. Created millions of years ago via mysterious race of aliens.

  • Open Doors: Fractured Fairy Tales

  • By: Sarah Clark Monagle, B.J. Lee, Fran Fischer, and others
  • Narrated by: Andy Babinski
  • Length: 7 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3

A whimsical collection of fairy tales. Ever wished to be like Sleeping Beauty so you could take a nap - for once? Isn't it a bit annoying how the fairytale princes always get the girl, or how the three little pigs always beat the wolf? Well, that's all about to change.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Funny, fun fairytales

  • By Paul on 05-15-16

Funny, fun fairytales

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-15-16

Because this was a collection of stories and Poems somewhere better than others but on the whole this was a great book. The narrator also sometimes seemed better than other times, but in some of the stories he did a masterful job.
Overall this was a delightful and foot are you book full of lots of short reads.

  • Mayflower

  • A Story of Courage, Community, and War
  • By: Nathaniel Philbrick
  • Narrated by: George Guidall
  • Length: 12 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,796
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,138
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,135

From the perilous ocean crossing to the shared bounty of the first Thanksgiving, the Pilgrim settlement of New England has become enshrined as our most sacred national myth. Yet, as best-selling author Nathaniel Philbrick reveals in his spellbinding new book, the true story of the Pilgrims is much more than the well-known tale of piety and sacrifice; it is a 55-year epic that is at once tragic, heroic, exhilarating, and profound.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fascinating book about a little-understood time

  • By John M on 02-04-07

Better than expected!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-10-16

This was a very good book. Well written and easy to read and understand, This book is full of complexity. This book tells a tale that is niether a slaughter of innocents by greedy Europeans, nor a story of rugged proto-Americans in a savage new land, nor an idealistic fairytale of peace. This is the story of people with people trying to survive in tough times

  • Orson Welles: The Ultimate Collection

  • By: Orson Welles
  • Narrated by: Orson Welles
  • Length: 60 hrs and 40 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 128
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 112
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 110

If you are a lover of old-time radio and a fan of Orson Welles, you won't want to miss this treasure chest of legendary Orson Welles radio broadcasts! With his flair for the sensational and innovative, Welles captured audiences' attention with his 1930s CBS weekly drama series The Mercury Theatre on the Air, later renamed The Campbell Playhouse, which featured hour-long dramatizations of classic books. His 1938 production, The War of the Worlds (an H. G. Wells adaptation) was especially memorable, as were many other productions, each featuring talented voices and actors.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Here is my review for what is worth.

  • By Scott on 07-03-14

A Potluck Production!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-06-16

Any additional comments?

This is a good collection of old time radio from a famous broadcaster. However, it is Not Digitally enhanced or edited. This means that some episodes are very staticy, to the point where it is hard to hear the story. The episodes are in completely random order with no a regard for chronology or continuity. Some segments are cut short, while others stretch into dead-air. There are several repeat stories, while other of Welles' famous episodes are left out. Some of the stories are based on timeless classics and some of the stories are very dated. Welles' version of Les Miserables is excellent and there were sever other gems. There is even an interesting, but random, interview between H.G. Wells and Orson Wells in section 6. For me one of the most fascinating broadcasts was Welles' version of Julius Ceaser, where you can hear him berating the cast in the background.
If you are really interested, its worth it, but you can probably find all of these broadcasts and more for free online.

One Final Note: Another Reviewer compiled a list of the shows in this download, but below is my version of that list in the order they appear in the download.


Section 1
“A Tale of Two Cities,” by Charles Dickens
“Abraham Lincoln,” Original Script, by John Drinkwater and Orson Welles
“Around the World in Eighty Days,” By Jules Verne
“A Christmas Carol,” by Charles Dickens
“A Christmas Carol,” by Charles Dickens
“Ah Wilderness,” by Eugene O'Neill
“Algiers,” By John Howard Lwson
“Arrowsmith,” by Sinclair Lewis
“Beau Geste,” by C. Wren

Section 2
“Counseled at Law,” by Elmer Rice
“Dinner at Eight,” by George S. Kaufman and Edna Ferber
“Dodsworth,” by Sinclair Lewis
“The Escape,” by John Galsworthy
“Huckleberry Finn,” by Mark Twain
“I Lost My Girlish Laughter,” by George Kaufman and Jane Allen
“It Happened One Night,” by Samuel Hopkins Adams
“June Moon,” by Ring Lardner & George S Kaufman with Jack Benny

Section 3
“Lilleon,” by Ferenc Molnar
“Lost Herizon,” by James Hilton
“Mr. Deeds Goes to Town,” by Clarence Budington Kelland, motion picture screenplay by Robert Riskin
“Mutiny on the Bounty,” by Charles Nordhoff and Norman Hall
“Only Angels Have Wings,” by Howard Hawks, motion picture screenplay by Jules Furthman
“Our Town,” by Thorton Wilder
"Peter Ibbetson," by George du Maurier
“Private Lives,” by Noell Coward

Section 4
“Rabble in Arms,” by Kenneth Roberts
“Rebecca," by Daphne du Maurier
“Showboat,” by Edna Ferber
"The Bad Man," by Porter Emerson Browne
"The Citadel" by A. J. Cronin,
“The Count of Monte Cristo,” By Alexander Dumas
“The Garden of Allah," by Robert Hichens
“The Glass Key,” by Dashiell Hammett

Section 5
“The Green Goddess" by William Archer
“The Hurricane,” by James Norman Hall and Charles Nordhoff
“The Magnificent Ambersons," by Booth Tarkington
"The Murder of Roger Ackroyd" by Agatha Christie
“The Patriot,” by Pearl Buck
“Theodora Goes Wild,” by Mary McCarthy, screenplay by Sidney Buchman
“American cavalcade: The Things We Have,” by Orson Welles
“Vanity Fair,” by William Makepeace Thackeray
“Vanessa,” by Hugh Walpole

Section 6
“Victoria Regina" by Laurence Housman
“What Every Woman Knows,” by J. M. Barrie
“Wickford Point,” by John P. Marquand
“Count Dracula,” by Bram Stoker
Dialogue between H.G. Wells & Orsen Welles
“Heart of Darkness,” by J. Conrad & Clarence Day
"Hell on Ice" by Edward Ellsberg
“Julius Ceaser”, by William Shakespeare
“Les Miserable,” by Victor Hugo adpted by Orson Welles, part 1

Section 7
“Les Miserable,” by Victor Hugo adpted by Orson Welles, parts 2-7
"A Passenger to Bali" by Ellis St. Joseph
“Thirty-nine Steps,” by John Buchan
“The Affairs of Anatol" by Arthur Schnitzler
“The Count of Monte Cristo" by Alexandre Dumas
”Sherlock Holmes" by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, from the play by William Gillette

Section 8
“The Man Who Was Thursday,” by G.K. Chesteron
“The Pickwick Papers,” by Charles Dickens
“The War of the Worlds,” by H.G. Wells
Three Stories: “I'm a Fool,” by Sherwood Anderson & “The open window,” by H.H. Monroe aka. Saki & “My Little Boy,” by Carl Eawald
“Seventeen,” by Booth Tarkington
“The Thirty-nine Steps,” by John buchm
“Treasure Island,” by Robert Lewis Stevenson

12 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • The Helmet of Horror

  • The Myth of Theseus and the Minotaur #4
  • By: Victor Pelevin
  • Narrated by: full cast
  • Length: 3 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 6

They have never met, they have been assigned strange pseudonyms, they inhabit identical rooms that open out onto very different landscapes, and they have entered a dialogue they cannot escape - a discourse defined and destroyed by the Helmet of Horror. Its wearer is the dominant force they call Asterisk, a force for good and ill in which the Minotaur is forever present and Theseus is the great unknown.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Not a story but a great philosophical exploration

  • By Paul on 09-19-15

Not a story but a great philosophical exploration

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-19-15

This is an epistomological essay dressed up as a mythical story. If you like philosophy or postmodern writing you will love this book but if you're looking for a good story with plot and character development, this isn't for you!
The production value is amazing! The readers are great! The ideas in the book are both compelling and mystifying. But this is not a book for your average audiobook listener. So "Caveat Emptor!"

The Devil's Woods audiobook cover art
  • The Devil's Woods

  • By: Brian Moreland
  • Narrated by: Randy Hames
  • Length: 11 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 20
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 20
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 20

There is a place the locals call "the Devil's Woods," but to speak of it will only bring the devil to your door. It is a place so evil that even animals avoid it. When their father's expedition team goes missing, Kyle Elkheart and his brother and sister return to the abandoned Cree Indian reservation where they were born. Kyle can see ghosts that haunt the woods surrounding the village - and they seem to be trying to warn him.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • OK story GOD AWFUL narration.

  • By Luis P Bonilla on 11-22-15

Not so good

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-18-15

I knew by the second chapter this book would be mediocre at best, so I sped up the audio, and I am glad I did. It was just flat and predictable. I don't think the Native American stuff was very accurate, and there were lots of clenches and plot holes. (And needless descriptions of butts breasts, and penises. (Some people might like that but it was just too much for my taste.). Lots of stuff left unexplained, and it lacked the literary complexity of Lovecraft, Wade-Wellman, or King. The best part was the narrator and his diversity of voices, but even that wasn't very unique. My recommendation spend your money on something better

  • Emperor Mollusk Versus the Sinister Brain

  • By: A. Lee Martinez
  • Narrated by: Scott Aiello
  • Length: 7 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,499
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,332
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,330

Emperor Mollusk. Intergalactic Menace. Destroyer of Worlds. Conqueror of Other Worlds. Mad Genius. Ex-Warlord of Earth. Not bad for a guy without a spine. But what's a villain to do after he's done... everything. With no new ambitions, he's happy to pitch in and solve the energy crisis or repel aliens invaders should the need arise, but if he had his way, he'd prefer to be left alone to explore the boundaries of dangerous science. Just as a hobby, of course. Retirement isn't easy though.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Hilariously wacky!

  • By Kat Hooper on 04-09-12

Terrible

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-01-15

The reviews said it was like douglas adams, NOT AT ALL! The characters were all flat and unappealing. The plot was nonsensical, but not in a funny way. Whole chapters seemed to be there just to make the book longer and sillier.
But the narrator was very good we had many different voices. He is the only reason this book got a 2 instead of a 1

  • Return To Hell House

  • By: Nancy A. Collins
  • Narrated by: Jamie du Pont MacKenzie
  • Length: 1 hr and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 73
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 68
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 68

In 1927 the infamous millionaire occultist Emeric Belasco disappeared without a trace, leaving behind dozens of dead bodies in the rambling, isolated mansion known as Hell House. In 1931 a team of parapsychologists entered Hell House in order to solve the riddle of Belasco's fate, only to meet with horror, insanity and death.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not the original

  • By Paul on 07-08-15

Not the original

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-08-15

I was skeptical when I first saw how short this prequel was compared to Matthesons' original Hell House. (but to be fair there stay was shorter). Then I worried about reading the prequel, because sometimes it's scarier to not know. But the allure was too Great!
As a stand alone, this is a good short story, but compared to its pregenator it falls flat. None of the characters are as deep or complex. In fact the physical appearance of the house gets more detail than the characters and their lives. This is especially true for Bilasco, the demonic ghost. The subtlety and intelligence of the house is lacking. The other major aspect that was missing was what I would call, "background detail." We get a minimal description of the doctors scientific theory of ghosts but that's it! No idea why these particular people were chosen for the expedition. Little idea of their motives for going. Little understanding of their methods and experiments. . They do not even do a full tour of the house in three days. (Never going to the basement garage). And little understanding of what they intend to do with the psychic energy of Hell House.
Finally, and I may be knitt picking, but I don't think return to Hell House matches with Hell House itself. For example Ben Fisher indicates his original group had trouble with both the keys and the generator, which they don't in this story. I don't even think the layout of the house is the same.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful