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CHET YARBROUGH

LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States
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  • Letting Go

  • The Pathway of Surrender
  • By: David R. Hawkins MD. PHD.
  • Narrated by: Peter Lownds PhD
  • Length: 12 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,634
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,293
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,278

Letting Go describes a simple and effective means by which to let go of the obstacles to enlightenment and become free of negativity. During the many decades of the author's clinical psychiatric practice, the primary aim was to seek the most effective ways to relieve human suffering in all of its many forms. The inner mechanism of surrender was found to be of great practical benefit and is described in this book.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Read it, practice it... and change your life

  • By ScottishLass on 07-22-15

COSMIC MIND

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-24-18

David R. Hawkins died in 2012. He was 85 years old. Hawkins lived life. like all human beings, in transition. At turns, Hawkins transitioned from agnosticism to atheism to belief in God. This progression seems correlated with education and experience but ends in philosophical belief. In each transition, Hawkins uses his intellect to form a philosophy that has appeal to many in search of life’s meaning. At times, Hawkins seems beyond reason but each step he takes offers insight to how one may live a more fulfilling life. Hawkins might be broadly characterized as a mystic. Even so, he was a formally educated, practicing physician, and psychiatrist.

To escape the trap of Plato’s cave, Hawkins explains one must use their senses to accept the mind’s perception of reality and continually let it go until its negative power disappears. An example would be one who gets angry over some event or action and accepts the anger; looks at it, accepts it, uses the mind to understand why there is anger, where it is coming from, and then letting it go. In the process, one finds anger has no meaning other than what one’s mind gave it.

With continual use of this process, Hawkins believes individual minds tap into a cosmic mind that shows the world as it really is; not simply as shadows on a cave wall. There is wisdom in Hawkins’ perception of life and how one can more constructively deal with its vicissitudes. “Letting Go” is wise counsel for those troubled by emotional and/or physical trauma. However, the principle of a cosmic mind takes a leap of faith.

  • My Absolute Darling

  • A Novel
  • By: Gabriel Tallent
  • Narrated by: Alex McKenna
  • Length: 15 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,069
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 988
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 985

Turtle Alveston is a survivor. At 14, she roams the woods along the Northern California coast. The creeks, tide pools, and rocky islands are her haunts and her hiding grounds, and she is known to wander for miles. But while her physical world is expansive, her personal one is small and treacherous. Turtle has grown up isolated since the death of her mother, in the thrall of her tortured and charismatic father, Martin.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Talented writer that needs direction

  • By Mel on 09-08-17

INCEST

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-10-18

“My Absolute Darling” is a debut novel for Gabriel Tallent.  Tallent’s first book is a subject that shocks the senses.  It reminds one of Nabokov’s “Lolita” in its insight to child abuse.  However, it adds the reprehensible dimension of incest.  Though Tallent is less lyrical than Nabokov, the disgust a listener feels as he processes the story is equivalent.

Both Tallent and Nabokov identify men of subsumed intelligence that rationalize sexual perversion.  Martin is father to a young girl who lost his wife.  The girl is named Julia but is generally called Turtle.  Turtle hides in a protective shell manufactured by her father.  The shell protects but also isolates her from the world.  Her view is her father’s view.  Her seduction is based on familial trust that is brutally and disgustingly enlisted by her father.

Tallent’s ending is at once compelling and disappointing.  It compels with its drama but disappoints in its resolution.  The disappointment is in the real-world complexity of stopping parental abuse. 

  • Exit West

  • A Novel
  • By: Mohsin Hamid
  • Narrated by: Mohsin Hamid
  • Length: 4 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,834
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,686
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,676

In a country teetering on the brink of civil war, two young people meet - sensual, fiercely independent Nadia and gentle, restrained Saeed. They embark on a furtive love affair and are soon cloistered in a premature intimacy by the unrest roiling their city. When it explodes, turning familiar streets into a patchwork of checkpoints and bomb blasts, they begin to hear whispers about doors - doors that can whisk people far away, if perilously and for a price.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Where to Live?

  • By David on 04-04-17

EMIGRATION

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-15-18

Hamid poignantly explains how difficult it is for an emigre to leave their home-country for fear of violence and hunger; only to face the same in a country they do not know.

  • The Emperor of All Maladies

  • A Biography of Cancer
  • By: Siddhartha Mukherjee
  • Narrated by: Fred Sanders
  • Length: 22 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 2,132
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,939
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,928

The Emperor of All Maladies reveals the many faces of an iconic, shape-shifting disease that is the defining plague of our generation. The story of cancer is a story of human ingenuity, resilience, and perseverance but also of hubris, arrogance, paternalism, and misperception, all leveraged against a disease that, just three decades ago, was thought to be easily vanquished in an all-out "war against cancer".

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Incredible

  • By S.R.E. on 03-02-16

TO A HAMMER EVERYTHING IS A NAIL

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-01-18

Siddhartha Mukherjee examines the history of cancer. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report heart disease and cancer are the two leading causes of death. At first glance, one thinks--so what? We are living longer, and everyone dies of something. However, Mukherjee notes a recent study shows cancer deaths are rising, even when age is removed from the equation. In the process, he exposes the arrogance of medical specialization.

Mukherjee shows early attempts to cure cancer were led by surgeons who removed cancerous growth. “The Emperor of All Maladies” reminds one of the saying—"To a hammer, everything is a nail”. Cancer is a slippery killer. The hammer, in the early days of treatment, is a scalpel wielded by surgeons who cut deeper and deeper into the body until the patient is either permanently disabled or dead. The surgeon believes he has removed the cancer only to find it returns in weeks or months later.

Mukherjee addresses the need for funding to expand cancer research. He is not Pollyannaish about the need. He acknowledges cancer research is not going to be like America’s race to the moon in the 1960s. There is no definitive goal. The goal is not fixed like a mission to Mars. Cancer’s etiology evolves. It is unlikely for there to be a single-bullet solution that will cure cancer. The cure begins with physician attention and empathy for the patient; not for physician self-congratulation. Cancer is an eternal war. It changes with the environment and life’s evolutionary laws.

  • Mrs. Fletcher

  • By: Tom Perrotta
  • Narrated by: Finn Wittrock, Carrie Coon
  • Length: 8 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,083
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 994
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 988

Eve Fletcher is trying to figure out what comes next. A 46-year-old divorcée whose beloved only child has just left for college, Eve is struggling to adjust to her empty nest when one night her phone lights up with a text message. Sent from an anonymous number, the mysterious sender tells Eve, "U R my MILF!" Over the months that follow, that message comes to obsess Eve. Before long, Eve's online fixations begin to spill over into real life, revealing new romantic possibilities that threaten to upend her quiet suburban existence.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Obviously written by a man

  • By Laurie Cota on 11-01-17

AGEISM

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-01-18

Tom Perrotta is a good story teller. One is unsure of his objectivity but "Mrs. Fletcher" is a young man's fantasy, with a personal view of ageism.

Perrota emasculates young men who demean women and sexually energizes women in their youth and mid-40s. All is well that ends well (which "Mrs. Fletcher" does) but the fecklessness of youth seems hyperbolic and women's desire seems overdrawn.

Still, Perrotta tells a fascinating story that peaks imagination and offers "happy" endings.

  • Norse Mythology

  • By: Neil Gaiman
  • Narrated by: Neil Gaiman
  • Length: 6 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36,251
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 33,163
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32,999

Neil Gaiman has long been inspired by ancient mythology in creating the fantastical realms of his fiction. Now he turns his attention back to the source, presenting a bravura rendition of the great northern tales. In Norse Mythology, Gaiman fashions primeval stories into a novelistic arc that begins with the genesis of the legendary nine worlds; delves into the exploits of the deities, dwarves, and giants; and culminates in Ragnarok, the twilight of the gods and the rebirth of a new time and people.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Comedy-Tragedy of Gods Giants Dwarfs & Monsters

  • By Jefferson on 02-24-17

ANCIENT GODS

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-28-18

Neil Gaiman brightens and enlightens with stories of ancient Norse gods who are recreated in today's Marvel movies.
Thor is something less and Loki something more. Gaiman's narration is great fun.

  • Brain Myths Exploded

  • Lessons from Neuroscience
  • By: The Great Courses, Indre Viskontas
  • Narrated by: Indre Viskontas
  • Length: 11 hrs and 55 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,418
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,267
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,256

Much of the layperson's knowledge of the brain is predicated on a lack of understanding about this mysterious organ. To start building a more straightforward, accurate understanding of current breakthroughs in neuroscience, you have to start by shattering popular brain myths.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great lecturer, very enjoyable

  • By Jared T Wilsey on 02-14-17

KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-20-18

Indre Viskontas covers a broad area of knowledge and experience. She offers many counter intuitive insights to human behavior and the brain in several recorded lectures. She explains neuronal and behavioral functions of the brain.

Viskontas explains how and why the brain, though highly complex, and insightful, can be judgmentally weak, misleading, and health adverse. One human brain can provide extraordinary insight to the nature of things and events while maintaining the autonomic systems of the body. On the other hand, that same brain can create appalling misinformation about things and events, distort the truth, and cause autonomic failures.

Viskontas and other writers have exploded myths of accurate human memory. Human brains are not movie projectors. Human brains recall memories as stories; not discrete facts. Memories are recreations of what one has experienced (both in the distant past, near past, and present). Facts are often added, and stories are embellished when memories are recalled. The accuracy of memories is highly influenced by an individual’s past and present experience.

There are more brain myths exploded by Viskontas, but a final example is the myth that we use only 10% of our brain. All parts of our brain are interconnected. Not all parts are necessarily engaged at once, but interconnections suggests 100% of our brain is used at one time or another.

Viskontas’s knowledge and experience suggest memory holds some truth but not all the truth.

  • The Attention Merchants

  • The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads
  • By: Tim Wu
  • Narrated by: Marc Cashman
  • Length: 15 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 471
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 413
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 413

In nearly every moment of our waking lives, we face a barrage of advertising enticements, branding efforts, sponsored social media, commercials and other efforts to harvest our attention. Over the last century, few times or spaces have remained uncultivated by the "attention merchants", contributing to the distracted, unfocused tenor of our times. Tim Wu argues that this is not simply the byproduct of recent inventions, but the end result of more than a century's growth and expansion in the industries that feed on human attention.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • It's Been Sold

  • By Scott on 10-24-16

OTHER gods

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-29-18

Not since “The Powers That Be” (published in 1979) has there been a better history of the media industry. Tim Wu is heir to David Halberstam. First there were newspapers, then radio, then television, and now the world-wide web. Wu offers a modern vision of media’s impact on society in “The Attention Merchants”.

Gone are many of the famed “…Attention Merchants” like Bill Bernbach, Neil French, and David Ogilvy. They were the early influencers; i.e. the copy writers, and agents that created consumer advertising for Sulzberger, Chandler, Hutchins, Paley, and Luce. They worked for founders of some of the most influential newspaper, radio, television and magazine outlets of the 19th and 20th centuries. They were the “gods” of a newly formed consumer society. Consumers read, watched, and listened to pitches for everything from votes to vitamins to the latest model Cadillac. Wu shows pitches remain the same, but methods have changed.

Wu recounts how advertising became a critical part of early media’s power, influence, and profit. Just as advertisers promoted false benefits of smoking in the 20th, internet advertisers promote false benefits of free access to information and entertainment in the 21st century. Neither smoking or “free” access to information is without harm or cost. The Marlborough man is dead, and “free” internet information is not free. “Fake news” has always been in the “…Attention Merchant’s” tool box but Wu shows that a new dimension is created with the rise of “free” information technology.

There is a cost to voters and consumers because personal information is being sold without pay for product that enriches “…Attention Merchants”, private enterprise, and government. The product delivered is the personal information that reveals who we are, what we think, what we desire, and what we are willing to pay. Consumers have less control over their decisions because “…Attention Merchants” use intimate personal information to seduce conscious and unconscious motivation.

The sinister aspect of Wu’s explanation is that “…Attention Merchants” now have tools that exaggerate the impact of “fake news”. By knowing intimate beliefs of consumers, “…Attention Merchants” are able to create algorithms that funnel “fake news” that feeds what consumer’s may either accurately or inaccurately believe. Prejudices and discrimination are reinforced. The worst characteristics of political populism are reinforced. “The Attention Merchants” expand control of individual thought so that the course of democratic elections, government policies, or business successes can be unduly influenced by false or misleading information.

As Marie Currie is to have said— “Nothing in life is to be feared. It is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less.” Of course, one might remember, she died from the radiation she received from her discoveries.

  • Asabiyyah

  • What Ibn Khaldun, the Islamic Father of Social Science, Can Teach Us About the World Today
  • By: Ed West
  • Narrated by: P. J. Ochlan
  • Length: 1 hr and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15

A quarter of a century after the end of Communism swept away the ideological conflict of the "short 20th century", a new world is once again taking shape, this time in the Middle East. But what does the crisis in the region, and its refugee exodus into Europe, signify for the future of the world? And why has the noble dream of nation-building failed? Focusing mainly on religion, ideology or economics, most analysis ignored one crucial factor: asabiyyah, or group feeling, something outlined six and a half centuries ago.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • RISE AND FALL

  • By CHET YARBROUGH on 04-26-18
  • Asabiyyah
  • What Ibn Khaldun, the Islamic Father of Social Science, Can Teach Us About the World Today
  • By: Ed West
  • Narrated by: P. J. Ochlan

RISE AND FALL

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-26-18

Ed West offers a brief introduction to the life of an ancient historian. His name is Ibn Khaldun. Khaldun describes the first known evolutionary theory of human origin. West also notes this 14th century scholar creates the first known socio/political theory of the rise and fall of civilizations.

Khaldun explains life’s origin as a congregation of chemicals and minerals that create organic life and, in turn, evolve into different species. West notes that Khaldun suggests humankind evolved from monkeys. This is four centuries before Darwin’s “Origin of Species”.

Khaldun offers councel to the great conqueror, Amir Timur (aka Tammerlane), who plans to resurrect the 13th century Mongol empire built by Genghis Khan. (Timur is said to have caused the death of over 17 million people in the effort.)

West suggests that Khaldun explains how Timur and other rulers, from the Roman empire to Genghis Kahn to Timur successfully conquered great areas of the known world. His explanation is “Asabiyyah” (aas-sah-bee-ah), a theory that all successful conquerors establish a social environment that creates solidarity among a group of people through shared understanding, purpose, and achievement.

Of course, leadership is key to any future. Right now, there seem few leaders that can make civilizations grow beyond their borders. Khaldun seems as relevant today as he was in the 4th and early 5th centuries.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Digital Gold

  • Bitcoin and the Inside Story of the Misfits and Millionaires Trying to Reinvent Money
  • By: Nathaniel Popper
  • Narrated by: Robert Fass
  • Length: 10 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,572
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,386
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,381

A New York Times technology and business reporter charts the dramatic rise of Bitcoin and the fascinating personalities who are striving to create a new global money for the Internet age.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Informative, but dry

  • By Tomer on 05-10-16

BITCOIN

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-15-18

Nathaniel Popper writes a book on the history of bitcoin.  His history is a “Just the facts Mam” presentation.  One will draw their own conclusion about the good and bad qualities of cryptocurrency.

Just like the dollar, pound, renminbe (yuan), franc, and euro, bitcoin is used for legal and illegal transactions.  There are a host of criminals who have gamed currencies.  Pepper recounts examples of bitcoin that show it is not exempt from currency manipulation.

No form of currency guarantees value.  Every form of currency has its ups and downs.  The difference is in who makes the decision about value.  If you live in a highly inflationary country, bitcoin offers some level of stability.  If you live in a wealthy and relatively stable country, bitcoin seems less attractive.

The future of bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies seems more utilitarian in a future where nationalism disappears and there is acceptance of a world economy based on equality of opportunity.  We seem far from such a Utopian world.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful