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CHET YARBROUGH

LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States
  • 539
  • reviews
  • 1,064
  • helpful votes
  • 987
  • ratings
  • Macbeth

  • By: Jo Nesbo
  • Narrated by: Euan Morton
  • Length: 17 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 302
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 274
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 273

Set in the 1970s in a run-down, rainy, industrial town, Jo Nesbo's Macbeth centers around a police force struggling to shed an incessant drug problem. Duncan, chief of police, is idealistic and visionary, a dream to the townspeople but a nightmare for criminals. The drug trade is ruled by two drug lords, one of whom - a master of manipulation named Hecate - has connections with the highest in power and plans to use them to get his way.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great story, listen to the sample first

  • By stuartjash on 04-12-18

IMPLAUSIBLE

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-17-18

Author fails to suspend imagination well enough to make his story worthy of Shakespearean allusions .

  • The Overstory

  • By: Richard Powers
  • Narrated by: Suzanne Toren
  • Length: 22 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 551
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 508
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 508

The Overstory unfolds in concentric rings of interlocking fable that range from antebellum New York to the late 20th-century Timber Wars of the Pacific Northwest and beyond. An air force loadmaster in the Vietnam War is shot out of the sky, then saved by falling into a banyan. An artist inherits 100 years of photographic portraits, all of the same doomed American chestnut. A hard-partying undergraduate in the late 1980s electrocutes herself, dies, and is sent back into life by creatures of air and light. A hearing- and speech-impaired scientist discovers that trees are communicating with one another.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Astonishingly powerful writing.

  • By Alexandria on 04-18-18

BLINK OF THE EYE

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-28-18

Humanity’s years of life are but a blink of an eye. Richard Powers, like Cervantes’ Don Quixote, tilts at a windmill that neither generates power, grinds corn, or pumps water.

You love Powers way with words but come away from “The Overstory” feeling like Quixote’s relatives–mourning his loss of sanity but rejoicing in his belief of love and life.

In travels around the world, one witnesses China’s ecological crises when everyone, including indigenous Chinese, drink bottled water. Our guide in India notes his country is teetering on the brink of ecological catastrophe. And, our American President denies global warming by calling it a hoax. It seems unlikely the world will wake up before it is too late.

Trees may have a language, but technology is unlikely to provide any translation that humanity will accept. One hopes Powers’ imaginative story is a Cervantes’ tale; not a prophecy.

  • The Underground Railroad (Oprah's Book Club)

  • A Novel
  • By: Colson Whitehead
  • Narrated by: Bahni Turpin
  • Length: 10 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,744
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,785
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,753

The Newest Oprah Book Club 2016 Selection. Cora is a slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. Life is hell for all the slaves but especially bad for Cora; an outcast even among her fellow Africans, she is coming into womanhood - where even greater pain awaits. When Caesar, a recent arrival from Virginia, tells her about the Underground Railroad, they decide to take a terrifying risk and escape. Matters do not go as planned - Cora kills a young white boy who tries to capture her. Though they manage to find a station and head north, they are being hunted.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Stupendous book, hard to follow in audio

  • By JQR on 12-01-16

AMERICA

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-12-18

It seems unreal to believe America treated human beings as property in the ninetieth century. Colson Whitehead’s story of “The Underground Railroad” shows how ingrained and ugly discrimination is, and how modern belief in ethnic or moral superiority continues to infect America. The story of Cora shows how social injustice spreads and how it can only be cured by truth and belief in human equality.

Where is America now? Have 242 years of history changed America’s penchant for overt and covert violence against those who appear different? South Carolina’s Charlottesville’ KKK rally suggests not.

  • Letting Go

  • The Pathway of Surrender
  • By: David R. Hawkins MD. PHD.
  • Narrated by: Peter Lownds PhD
  • Length: 12 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,814
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,438
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,422

Letting Go describes a simple and effective means by which to let go of the obstacles to enlightenment and become free of negativity. During the many decades of the author's clinical psychiatric practice, the primary aim was to seek the most effective ways to relieve human suffering in all of its many forms. The inner mechanism of surrender was found to be of great practical benefit and is described in this book.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Read it, practice it... and change your life

  • By ScottishLass on 07-22-15

COSMIC MIND

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-24-18

David R. Hawkins died in 2012. He was 85 years old. Hawkins lived life. like all human beings, in transition. At turns, Hawkins transitioned from agnosticism to atheism to belief in God. This progression seems correlated with education and experience but ends in philosophical belief. In each transition, Hawkins uses his intellect to form a philosophy that has appeal to many in search of life’s meaning. At times, Hawkins seems beyond reason but each step he takes offers insight to how one may live a more fulfilling life. Hawkins might be broadly characterized as a mystic. Even so, he was a formally educated, practicing physician, and psychiatrist.

To escape the trap of Plato’s cave, Hawkins explains one must use their senses to accept the mind’s perception of reality and continually let it go until its negative power disappears. An example would be one who gets angry over some event or action and accepts the anger; looks at it, accepts it, uses the mind to understand why there is anger, where it is coming from, and then letting it go. In the process, one finds anger has no meaning other than what one’s mind gave it.

With continual use of this process, Hawkins believes individual minds tap into a cosmic mind that shows the world as it really is; not simply as shadows on a cave wall. There is wisdom in Hawkins’ perception of life and how one can more constructively deal with its vicissitudes. “Letting Go” is wise counsel for those troubled by emotional and/or physical trauma. However, the principle of a cosmic mind takes a leap of faith.

  • My Absolute Darling

  • A Novel
  • By: Gabriel Tallent
  • Narrated by: Alex McKenna
  • Length: 15 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,210
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,118
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,112

Turtle Alveston is a survivor. At 14, she roams the woods along the Northern California coast. The creeks, tide pools, and rocky islands are her haunts and her hiding grounds, and she is known to wander for miles. But while her physical world is expansive, her personal one is small and treacherous. Turtle has grown up isolated since the death of her mother, in the thrall of her tortured and charismatic father, Martin.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Weird and completely underwhelming

  • By Chris on 10-10-17

INCEST

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-10-18

“My Absolute Darling” is a debut novel for Gabriel Tallent.  Tallent’s first book is a subject that shocks the senses.  It reminds one of Nabokov’s “Lolita” in its insight to child abuse.  However, it adds the reprehensible dimension of incest.  Though Tallent is less lyrical than Nabokov, the disgust a listener feels as he processes the story is equivalent.

Both Tallent and Nabokov identify men of subsumed intelligence that rationalize sexual perversion.  Martin is father to a young girl who lost his wife.  The girl is named Julia but is generally called Turtle.  Turtle hides in a protective shell manufactured by her father.  The shell protects but also isolates her from the world.  Her view is her father’s view.  Her seduction is based on familial trust that is brutally and disgustingly enlisted by her father.

Tallent’s ending is at once compelling and disappointing.  It compels with its drama but disappoints in its resolution.  The disappointment is in the real-world complexity of stopping parental abuse. 

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Exit West

  • A Novel
  • By: Mohsin Hamid
  • Narrated by: Mohsin Hamid
  • Length: 4 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,007
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,843
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,833

In a country teetering on the brink of civil war, two young people meet - sensual, fiercely independent Nadia and gentle, restrained Saeed. They embark on a furtive love affair and are soon cloistered in a premature intimacy by the unrest roiling their city. When it explodes, turning familiar streets into a patchwork of checkpoints and bomb blasts, they begin to hear whispers about doors - doors that can whisk people far away, if perilously and for a price.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Where to Live?

  • By David on 04-04-17

EMIGRATION

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-15-18

Hamid poignantly explains how difficult it is for an emigre to leave their home-country for fear of violence and hunger; only to face the same in a country they do not know.

  • The Emperor of All Maladies

  • A Biography of Cancer
  • By: Siddhartha Mukherjee
  • Narrated by: Fred Sanders
  • Length: 22 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,240
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,036
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 2,023

The Emperor of All Maladies reveals the many faces of an iconic, shape-shifting disease that is the defining plague of our generation. The story of cancer is a story of human ingenuity, resilience, and perseverance but also of hubris, arrogance, paternalism, and misperception, all leveraged against a disease that, just three decades ago, was thought to be easily vanquished in an all-out "war against cancer".

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Incredible

  • By S.R.E. on 03-02-16

TO A HAMMER EVERYTHING IS A NAIL

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-01-18

Siddhartha Mukherjee examines the history of cancer. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report heart disease and cancer are the two leading causes of death. At first glance, one thinks--so what? We are living longer, and everyone dies of something. However, Mukherjee notes a recent study shows cancer deaths are rising, even when age is removed from the equation. In the process, he exposes the arrogance of medical specialization.

Mukherjee shows early attempts to cure cancer were led by surgeons who removed cancerous growth. “The Emperor of All Maladies” reminds one of the saying—"To a hammer, everything is a nail”. Cancer is a slippery killer. The hammer, in the early days of treatment, is a scalpel wielded by surgeons who cut deeper and deeper into the body until the patient is either permanently disabled or dead. The surgeon believes he has removed the cancer only to find it returns in weeks or months later.

Mukherjee addresses the need for funding to expand cancer research. He is not Pollyannaish about the need. He acknowledges cancer research is not going to be like America’s race to the moon in the 1960s. There is no definitive goal. The goal is not fixed like a mission to Mars. Cancer’s etiology evolves. It is unlikely for there to be a single-bullet solution that will cure cancer. The cure begins with physician attention and empathy for the patient; not for physician self-congratulation. Cancer is an eternal war. It changes with the environment and life’s evolutionary laws.

  • Mrs. Fletcher

  • By: Tom Perrotta
  • Narrated by: Finn Wittrock, Carrie Coon
  • Length: 8 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,111
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,017
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 1,011

Eve Fletcher is trying to figure out what comes next. A 46-year-old divorcée whose beloved only child has just left for college, Eve is struggling to adjust to her empty nest when one night her phone lights up with a text message. Sent from an anonymous number, the mysterious sender tells Eve, "U R my MILF!" Over the months that follow, that message comes to obsess Eve. Before long, Eve's online fixations begin to spill over into real life, revealing new romantic possibilities that threaten to upend her quiet suburban existence.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • As usual for Tom Perrotta, very entertaining!

  • By Denise on 12-20-17

AGEISM

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-01-18

Tom Perrotta is a good story teller. One is unsure of his objectivity but "Mrs. Fletcher" is a young man's fantasy, with a personal view of ageism.

Perrota emasculates young men who demean women and sexually energizes women in their youth and mid-40s. All is well that ends well (which "Mrs. Fletcher" does) but the fecklessness of youth seems hyperbolic and women's desire seems overdrawn.

Still, Perrotta tells a fascinating story that peaks imagination and offers "happy" endings.

  • Norse Mythology

  • By: Neil Gaiman
  • Narrated by: Neil Gaiman
  • Length: 6 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38,177
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 34,911
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 34,745

Neil Gaiman has long been inspired by ancient mythology in creating the fantastical realms of his fiction. Now he turns his attention back to the source, presenting a bravura rendition of the great northern tales. In Norse Mythology, Gaiman fashions primeval stories into a novelistic arc that begins with the genesis of the legendary nine worlds; delves into the exploits of the deities, dwarves, and giants; and culminates in Ragnarok, the twilight of the gods and the rebirth of a new time and people.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Comedy-Tragedy of Gods Giants Dwarfs & Monsters

  • By Jefferson on 02-24-17

ANCIENT GODS

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-28-18

Neil Gaiman brightens and enlightens with stories of ancient Norse gods who are recreated in today's Marvel movies.
Thor is something less and Loki something more. Gaiman's narration is great fun.

  • Brain Myths Exploded

  • Lessons from Neuroscience
  • By: The Great Courses, Indre Viskontas
  • Narrated by: Indre Viskontas
  • Length: 11 hrs and 55 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,470
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,312
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,301

Much of the layperson's knowledge of the brain is predicated on a lack of understanding about this mysterious organ. To start building a more straightforward, accurate understanding of current breakthroughs in neuroscience, you have to start by shattering popular brain myths.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great lecturer, very enjoyable

  • By Jared T Wilsey on 02-14-17

KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-20-18

Indre Viskontas covers a broad area of knowledge and experience. She offers many counter intuitive insights to human behavior and the brain in several recorded lectures. She explains neuronal and behavioral functions of the brain.

Viskontas explains how and why the brain, though highly complex, and insightful, can be judgmentally weak, misleading, and health adverse. One human brain can provide extraordinary insight to the nature of things and events while maintaining the autonomic systems of the body. On the other hand, that same brain can create appalling misinformation about things and events, distort the truth, and cause autonomic failures.

Viskontas and other writers have exploded myths of accurate human memory. Human brains are not movie projectors. Human brains recall memories as stories; not discrete facts. Memories are recreations of what one has experienced (both in the distant past, near past, and present). Facts are often added, and stories are embellished when memories are recalled. The accuracy of memories is highly influenced by an individual’s past and present experience.

There are more brain myths exploded by Viskontas, but a final example is the myth that we use only 10% of our brain. All parts of our brain are interconnected. Not all parts are necessarily engaged at once, but interconnections suggests 100% of our brain is used at one time or another.

Viskontas’s knowledge and experience suggest memory holds some truth but not all the truth.