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Seth H. Wilson

Venice, CA USA
  • 32
  • reviews
  • 235
  • helpful votes
  • 140
  • ratings
  • Haunted House

  • By: Jack Kilborn
  • Narrated by: Rob Shapiro
  • Length: 8 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 759
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 689
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 687

At Butler House a series of grisly murders over a century have led many to believe it's haunted. To one scientist it's the perfect place for an experiment in fear. Eight people, each chosen because they lived through a terrifying experience, are offered a million dollars to spend one night at Butler House. They can take whatever they want with them - religious items, survival gear, and weapons. All they need to do is last the night.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Entertaining

  • By CoCoPuff on 07-23-15

This book is bonkers

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-11-18

This is one of those books where I can't decide if it's really bad or really good, but just having finished it, I'm leaning towards the latter. The book starts out as pretty generic haunted house fare, following in the footsteps of Shirley Jackson and Richard Matheson, albeit with a modern flair. But I was in the mood for a traditional haunted house yarn, and this fit the bill. But about three-quarters in, the book went a little topsy-turvy, and that's when it got really fun. Yes, it's a little schlocky, but what's wrong with that? If you like haunted house horror and aren't too squeamish, this book's worth your time.

  • Coyote America

  • A Natural and Supernatural History
  • By: Dan Flores
  • Narrated by: Elijah Alexander
  • Length: 8 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,547
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,406
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,406

Coyote America is both an environmental and a deep natural history of the coyote. It traces both the five-million-year-long biological story of an animal that has become the "wolf" in our backyards and its cultural evolution from a preeminent spot in Native American religions to the hapless foil of the Road Runner. A deeply American tale, the story of the coyote in the American West and beyond is a sort of Manifest Destiny in reverse.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Absolutely fascinating

  • By Rob Wolfe on 08-31-17

amazing stories lovingly told

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-18

It's clear from reading Coyote America that Dan Flores is the real deal. He has a deep abiding passion for these animals, and he tells their stories in a way that preserves some of their magic. I also really appreciated that the subtitle is true to its word--he devotes some serious time to exploring the coyote's mythical role in Native American culture. I'd love to listen to this book while taking a road trip up through New Mexico and Colorado, which is where a good bit of the action in this book takes place, although I was amazed to learn that coyotes have spread as far as New York City, the Deep South, and the Yukon. Amazing stuff.

  • Slade House

  • A Novel
  • By: David Mitchell
  • Narrated by: Thomas Judd, Tania Rodrigues
  • Length: 6 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,015
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 942
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 938

Down the road from a working-class British pub, along the brick wall of a narrow alley, if the conditions are exactly right, you'll find the entrance to Slade House. A stranger will greet you by name and invite you inside. At first, you won't want to leave. Later, you'll find that you can't. Every nine years, the house's residents - an odd brother and sister - extend a unique invitation to someone who's different or lonely: a precocious teenager, a recently divorced policeman, a shy college student. But what really goes on inside Slade House? For those who find out, it's already too late....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Gotta love David Mitchell

  • By S. Weaver on 12-06-15

A solid suspense/horror book with a problematic en

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

I was recently on the hunt for a decent "haunted house" novel, and stumbled across Slade House by David Mitchell. While I'd not read any Mitchell, I had seen Cloud Atlas, and his reputation as a writer precedes him, so I decided to give it a try.

The story unfolds through multiple points of view, and all these viewpoint characters are well-realized, though not always likable. To me, horror books in general and haunted house books in particular live or die (ha ha) on their atmosphere, and Slade House delivers gooseflesh-inducing atmosphere in spades. There's a repetitive structure to the book that gradually clues the reader in on what's going on, and ironically the more you know about what's going on the tenser it gets.

All this holds true until the last chapter, which I'm sorry to say is a bit of a mess. I will say, without spoiling anything, that it does provide closure--mostly. I say "mostly" because, unbeknownst to me when I bought this book, it's actually connected to Mitchell's other novel Bone Clocks, which I'd heard of but never read. And so, I think, maybe, the ending to this novel really only satisfies if you've also read that companion piece.

Still, if you like haunted house horror, it's still a worthwhile read. The horror is mostly suspenseful and atmospheric in nature, and doesn't devolve into the gore-fest of other novels in the genre. So I'd feel pretty safe in recommending this even to squeamish friends. Both Thomas Judd and Tania Rodrigues also shine as narrators here, and there were a few nice subtle production touches too.

In summary, the book mostly scratched my horror itch, but didn't quite hit the mark at the end.

  • We Were Feminists Once

  • From Riot Grrrl to CoverGirl®, the Buying and Selling of a Political Movement
  • By: Andi Zeisler
  • Narrated by: Joell A. Jacob
  • Length: 10 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 97
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 89
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 89

Today, feminism is no longer a dirty word, and women purporting to stand up for women's equality now include high-powered names like Beyoncé, Taylor Swift, and Emma Watson. Hip underwear lines sell granny pants with "feminist" emblazoned on the back. In every bookstore, there are scores of seductive feminist how-to business guides telling women how to achieve "it all".

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic book despite shoddy narration

  • By Seth H. Wilson on 05-19-16

Fantastic book despite shoddy narration

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-19-16

This is a thorough, thoughtful, though by no means unbiased study of a topic that defies easy definition. While I might have minor quibbles with Zeisler on very minor points, I agree with her premise that "marketplace feminismL is detrimental to the cause it purports to advance. Moreover, I think this theme can be seen in other contemporary movements.

I concur with other reviewers frustrated by this audiobook's narration. The density of mispronunciation a is kind of staggering. To be fair though, it's not entirely poor Joell A. Jacob's fault. The other members of the production team bear some responsibility too. And mispronunciation a aside, Jacob's performance is actually pretty easy on the ears, and matches the lively buoyant tone of Zeisler's prose.

This is the first book-length study of feminism I've read, but it certainly won't be the last. We're all in this together.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The Happiness Project

  • By: Gretchen Rubin
  • Narrated by: Gretchen Rubin
  • Length: 10 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,939
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 3,151
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,134

Gretchen Rubin had an epiphany one rainy afternoon in the unlikeliest of places: a city bus. "The days are long, but the years are short," she realized. "Time is passing, and I'm not focusing enough on the things that really matter." In that moment, she decided to dedicate a year to her happiness project.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great Book and Story

  • By kensipe on 07-30-12

Something for everyone

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-08-15

As Rubin prefaces her book, happiness looks different for all of us. So not every chapter of this book will be directly relevant to you or your life. Still, the principles of growth, mindfulness, and accountability outlined herein will make everyone happier.

  • The Little Stranger

  • By: Sarah Waters
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 15 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,154
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 866
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 863

The Little Stranger follows the strange adventures of Dr. Faraday, the son of a maid who has built a life of quiet respectability as a country doctor. One dusty postwar summer in his home of rural Warwickshire, he is called to a patient at Hundreds Hall. Home to the Ayres family for more than two centuries, the Georgian house, once grand and handsome, is now in decline - its masonry crumbling, its gardens choked with weeds, the clock in its stable yard permanently fixed at 20 to nine.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A creepy story, with atmosphere for days

  • By Lesley on 10-13-14

A great story, if a bit saggy

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-29-15

If you enjoy either period pieces or haunted house tales, you will likely enjoy "The Little Stranger." Waters takes a long time setting the scene, though, and to me this setup only partly pays off.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • So We Read On

  • How the Great Gatsby Came to Be and Why It Endures
  • By: Maureen Corrigan
  • Narrated by: Maureen Corrigan
  • Length: 10 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 151
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 135
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 134

Conceived nearly a century ago by a man who died believing himself a failure, it's now a revered classic and a rite of passage in the reading lives of millions. But how well do we really know The Great Gatsby? As Maureen Corrigan, Gatsby lover extraordinaire, points out, while Fitzgerald's masterpiece may be one of the most popular novels in America, many of us first read it when we were too young to fully comprehend its power.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Reading Gatsby as an adult reveals its greatness!

  • By Mark on 10-06-14

Literary criticism for everyone

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-13-15

The world needs more books like "So We Read On." There are many brilliant minds writing about the meaning and significance of great literature, but because they're writing to an academic audience in language laden with jargon, their important message is never heard by those who most need to hear it.

Corrigan's masterful melding of criticism, biography, and cultural commentary brings "The Great Gatsby" alive in a way that neither a dusty academic journal not a Hollywood blockbuster can do. Insightful yet entertaining, I hope this book serves as a model for other "biographies" of great literary works. Gatsby lives!

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • How to Watch TV News

  • By: Neil Postman, Steve Powers
  • Narrated by: Jeff Riggenbach
  • Length: 4 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 42
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 28
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 28

America is suffering from an information glut. Most Americans are no longer clear about what news is worth remembering or how any of it connects to anything else. Thus, Americans are rapidly becoming the least knowledgeable people in the industrial world. Author and academic Neil Postman and television journalist Steve Powers tell you how to become a discerning viewer.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Fair warning for TV watchers

  • By Seth H. Wilson on 02-27-15

Fair warning for TV watchers

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-15

Despite its age, this book is still a good guide to navigating the problems inherent in TV news. The ideas herein also apply to other media, especially digital content

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Amusing Ourselves to Death

  • Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business
  • By: Neil Postman
  • Narrated by: Jeff Riggenbach
  • Length: 4 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 849
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 683
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 669

In this eloquent and persuasive book, Neil Postman examines the deep and broad effects of television culture on the manner in which we conduct our public affairs, and how "entertainment values" have corrupted the very way we think. As politics, news, religion, education, and commerce are given less and less expression in the form of the printed word, they are rapidly being reshaped to suit the requirements of television.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Incredible

  • By Lonnie on 11-27-07

A warning to the TV generation

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-18-15

It must be remembered that this book is almost 30 years old, so it's inevitable that some of its arguments no longer quite work. But in most ways they do. Moreover, they often apply to our current internet generation as well.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Plagiarist

  • A Novella
  • By: Hugh Howey
  • Narrated by: Alexander J. Masters
  • Length: 1 hr and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 565
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 500
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 498

Adam Griffey is living two lives. By day, he teaches literature. At night, he steals it. Adam is a plagiarist, an expert reader with an eye for great works. He prowls simulated worlds perusing virtual texts, looking for the next big thing. And when he finds it, he memorizes it page by page, line by line, word for word. And then he brings it back to his world, the real world, and he sells it. But what happens when these virtual worlds begin to seem more real than his own? What happens when the people within them mean more to him than flesh and blood?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • The reader lacked tone.

  • By L or D Day on 03-17-15

Snow Crash for the literati

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-15

While the concept isn't wholly original, The Plagiarist is so well-executed and well-told that you don't really care. If you loved Snow Crash, and/or you like thinking about books and their provenance, you'll probably enjoy this little nugget of a novella.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful