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Pharoset

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  • helpful vote
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  • Oswald's Game

  • By: Jean Davison
  • Narrated by: Linda Sherbert
  • Length: 10 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3

While much was written in the wake of Lee Harvey Oswald’s assassination of President John F. Kennedy, few journalists stopped to ask who Oswald really was, and what was driving him. In Oswald’s Game, Davison slices to the core of the man, revealing Oswald’s most formative moments, beginning with his days as a difficult but intelligent child. She traces his erratic service in the Marine Corps, his youthful marriage, and the radical interests that prompted him to defect to the Soviet Union.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • The WORST Narrator!!!

  • By Pharoset on 05-21-18

The WORST Narrator!!!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-21-18

Linda She's very is absolutely horrible. She sounds like an answering machine. Flat delivery and absolutely no emotion. Just terrible.

  • Goebbels: A Biography

  • By: Peter Longerich, Alan Bance - translator, Jeremy Noakes - translator, and others
  • Narrated by: Simon Prebble
  • Length: 28 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 186
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 169
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 172

In life and in his grisly family suicide, Goebbels was one of Hitler's most loyal acolytes. Though powerful in the party and in wartime Germany, Longerich's Goebbels is a man dogged by insecurities and consumed by his fierce adherence to the Nazi cause. Longerich engages and challenges the careful self-portrait that Goebbels left behind in his diaries, and, as he delves deep into the mind of Hitler's master propagandist, Longerich discovers firsthand how the Nazi message was conceived. This complete portrait of the man behind the message is sure to become a standard for historians and students of the Holocaust for years to come.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent Account of the Private Goebbels, But...

  • By Derek on 05-29-15

Too Dependant on Diaries

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-07-17

Very static. No emotion. It's as if the author sat with the diaries in front of him and commented as he turned each page. Was a struggle to listen to and glad it ended. It's 28 hours I'll never get back!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Marina and Lee

  • The Tormented Love and Fatal Obsession Behind Lee Harvey Oswald's Assassination of John F. Kennedy
  • By: Priscilla Johnson McMillan
  • Narrated by: R. C. Bray, Joseph Finder
  • Length: 24 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42

Marina and Lee is one of the best and truest audiobooks about the Kennedy assassination. Priscilla Johnson McMillan came to the story with a unique knowledge of the two main characters. In the 1950s she knew Kennedy well for a time when he was hospitalized with Addison's disease. She talked to him frequently, brought him books, knew his wife, and formed a strong opinion of the sort of man he was. What is astonishing is that she also knew Lee Harvey Oswald.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Now I know why he did it

  • By Rodd on 06-09-14

The KGB Should Send This Narrator To The Gulag!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-09-16

Narrator R.C. Bray is so obnoxious with his faux Russian accent that I wanted to slap him every time I heard it. It really ruined the audio experience for me. Also, assuming the quotes from Oswald's wife Marina were accurate, I grew to dislike her intensely. She comes off as an arrogant, condescending, smarmy, sarcastic bitch. It appears Jack Ruby did Oswald a favor.
Finally, the author really disrupts the flow of the story with her "Interludes," in which she attempts to psychoanalyze the players. Her analysis comes off as mumbo-jumbo nonsense and undermines her credibility. She should have stuck to the chronological history and left the Freudian bullshit out of it.