LISTENER

Mark Grebner

East Lansing, MI USA
  • 4
  • reviews
  • 250
  • helpful votes
  • 5
  • ratings
Amy Foster
    
    
        By:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Joseph Conrad
    
    


    
    
        Narrated by:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        James O'Connell
    
    


    
    Length: 1 hr and 20 mins
    2 ratings
    Overall 2.5
  • Amy Foster

  • By: Joseph Conrad
  • Narrated by: James O'Connell
  • Length: 1 hr and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    2.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    1.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 2

Classic shortish story by Conrad that relates his self-thought alienation from British society, as a young foreign man survives a shipwreck off the coast of Kent, England only to be shunned by most of the townsfolk. The one exception is the loving, if dull-witted, Miss Foster.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Weak reader. Typical Joseph Conrad novelette.<br />

  • By Mark Grebner on 03-26-19

Weak reader. Typical Joseph Conrad novelette.<br />

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-26-19

I'm not qualified to review Joseph Conrad's place in the pantheon of authors. But James O'Connell doesn't seem to have a voice. He reads the words, mostly correctly, but there isn't any continuity conveyed by his tone.

I guess I've simply listened to too much Grover Gardner - it's so easy to tell the difference between greatness and mediocrity, if you really observe greatness closely.

My only comment on the body of the novel is that Joseph Conrad certainly depends on freakish events at sea to set up his land-based novels. in Nostromo, Lord Jim, and now Amy Foster, he uses a shipwreck to get all of his players delivered to the scene.

  • The Origins of Political Order: From Prehuman Times to the French Revolution

  • By: Francis Fukuyama
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis
  • Length: 22 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,167
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,875
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,858

Virtually all human societies were once organized tribally, yet over time most developed new political institutions which included a central state that could keep the peace and uniform laws that applied to all citizens. Some went on to create governments that were accountable to their constituents. We take these institutions for granted, but they are absent or are unable to perform in many of today’s developing countries—with often disastrous consequences for the rest of the world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best Summary of Political History I've Read

  • By blah on 05-12-13

The reader is a little weak.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-11-17

Fukiyama's book is beyond me to criticize or praise. It is a classic and an important intellectual milestone. This review focuses solely upon the reading.

Davis's voice is clear and properly inflated. He is easy to listen to and not droning or irritating. Unfortunately, he doesn't seem to understand the text in any deep way and so his stressing of words doesn't contribute to understanding the argument being presented, but frequently leads the listener down an incorrect mental path. Only a sentence later do you discover you have missed the point being made, and that you need to re-think what you've been listening to.

Many of Audible's readers set a higher standard. Davis is adequate, but not exemplary.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Meditations of Marcus Aurelius

  • By: Marcus Aurelius
  • Narrated by: Alan Munro
  • Length: 5 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,466
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 1,299
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,276

Meditations is former U.S. President Bill Clinton's favorite book. This audio consists of a series of personal writings by Marcus Aurelius, Roman Emperor 161-180 AD, setting forth his ideas on Stoic philosophy.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The reading made it impossible to focus on content

  • By Mark Grebner on 09-02-12

The reading made it impossible to focus on content

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-02-12

I looked forward to Meditations both as philosophy and for the insights it might yield into Roman history. But the experience was almost completely ruined by Alan Munro's reading.

His voice was mellifluous, clear, confident, and well-paced. But it was as if he were reading for transcription, pausing every three or four words for the stenographer to catch up. So instead of reading sentences and paragraphs in a way that brought out their meaning, he read small clusters of words, breaking apart their larger meanings in a way that made it impossible for me to follow the author's argument. If he were to read the preceding sentence, this would not be an exaggeration:

So instead of reading.
Sentences and paragraphs
In a way
That brought out their meaning
He read small clusters of words
Breaking apart their larger meanings
In a way
That made it impossible for me
To follow the author's argument.

I suppose somebody with a different attention span might find a much better experience, but I'll certainly never make the mistake of buying anything else Munro narrates.

242 of 244 people found this review helpful

  • The Federalist Papers

  • Selected Essays
  • By: Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay
  • Narrated by: Jim Killavey
  • Length: 5 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 66
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 33
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 30

The Federalist Papers are a series of 85 articles, written between 1897 and 1888, advocating for the ratification of the United States Constitution. They serve as a primary source for interpretation of the Constitution, as they outline the philosophy and motivation of the proposed system of government.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Classics must be rated

  • By Dale K. on 05-27-11

Very poorly read.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-05-10

Killavey's diction and pronunciation are acceptable, but he simply doesn't understand what he's reading, and as a result his intonation contributes nothing to understanding the meaning intended by the author, or even the structure of the sentences. He is, in effect, nothing but a human form of text-to-speech. I found myself, after listening to a sentence, re-articulating the same words, with properly distributed emphasis and pauses. I'm no professional actor, but it was easy to improve EVERY sentence.

Other readers featured by Audible range from competent to magnificent.

In addition, the omission from this collection of the great bulk of the Federalist opus is troubling. Shouldn't the description state that it's only "a sampling"?

8 of 19 people found this review helpful