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  • Hue 1968

  • A Turning Point of the American War in Vietnam
  • By: Mark Bowden
  • Narrated by: Joe Barrett
  • Length: 18 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,141
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,062
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,053

By January 1968, despite an influx of half a million American troops, the fighting in Vietnam seemed to be at a stalemate. Yet General William Westmoreland, commander of American forces, announced a new phase of the war in which "the end begins to come into view". The North Vietnamese had different ideas. In mid-1967, the leadership in Hanoi had started planning an offensive intended to win the war in a single stroke.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • I KNEW This Book Would Sting Me . . . .

  • By Bee Keeper on 07-28-17

Vibrant, personal, enthralling ...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-09-18

This is a vibrant, personal and enthralling narrative of the bloodiest battle of the Vietnam War.

  • The Korean War

  • By: Max Hastings
  • Narrated by: Cameron Stewart
  • Length: 19 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 281
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 259
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 260

On 25 June, 1950, the invasion of South Korea by the Communist North launched one of the bloodiest conflicts of the last century. The seemingly limitless power of the Chinese-backed North was thrown against the ferocious firepower of the UN-backed South in a war that can be seen today as the stark prelude to Vietnam.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brings a true history to a war that is often over looked

  • By rstone23 on 03-30-16

well-rounded & thoughtful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-26-15

this is a well-rounded and thoughtful survey of the American and English experience in the Korean War. the narrator sought to enliven quotations with his imitations of the various accents of the speakers, which I could have lived without; but I can't suggest a better way to signal the beginnings and endings of quoted material, so even that I got used to. Hastings I have grown accustomed to enjoying and respecting.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful