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dogcow

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  • Fear

  • Trump in the White House
  • By: Bob Woodward
  • Narrated by: Robert Petkoff
  • Length: 12 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,642
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,031
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,931

With authoritative reporting honed through eight presidencies from Nixon to Obama, author Bob Woodward reveals in unprecedented detail the harrowing life inside President Donald Trump’s White House and precisely how he makes decisions on major foreign and domestic policies. Woodward draws from hundreds of hours of interviews with firsthand sources, meeting notes, personal diaries, files, and documents. The focus is on the explosive debates and the decision-making in the Oval Office, the Situation Room, Air Force One, and the White House residence.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Extremely Depressing...

  • By Sena on 09-11-18

gripping and balanced

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-14-18

Woodward makes you feel as though you are in the room with these guys at the highest levels of government, his writing style is gripping.

1 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Chasing Phil

  • The Adventures of Two Undercover Agents with the World's Most Charming Con Man
  • By: David Howard
  • Narrated by: Joe Ochman
  • Length: 10 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 39
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 35

The Thunderbird Motel, 1977. J. J. Wedick and Jack Brennan - two fresh-faced, maverick FBI agents - were about to embark on one of their agency's first wire-wearing undercover missions. Their target? Charismatic, globetrotting con man Phil Kitzer, whom some called the world's greatest swindler. From the Thunderbird, the three men took off to Cleveland, to Miami, to Hawaii, to Frankfurt, to the Bahamas - meeting other members of Kitzer's crime syndicate and powerful politicians and businessmen he fooled at each stop.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • hilarious

  • By dogcow on 05-05-18

hilarious

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-05-18

having met low level crooks of this type,the descriptions rang totally authentic. the money made ,and blown and even bigger fortunes that only exist in that elusive "last big score" could have easily been based on people ive met

  • In the Heat of the Night

  • By: John Ball
  • Narrated by: Dion Graham
  • Length: 5 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 41
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39

It's the 1960s. A hot August night lies heavy over the Carolinas. The corpse - legs sprawled, stomach down on the concrete pavement, arms above the head - brings the patrol car to a halt. The local police pick up a black stranger named Virgil Tibbs, only to discover that their most likely suspect is a homicide detective from California - and the racially tense community's single hope in solving a brutal murder that turns up no witnesses, no motives, and no clues.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very entertaining

  • By M. Gatewood on 06-27-17

Great book, fans of the film might be disappointed

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-14-18

Like most Americans I knew of the classic Sidney Poitier/Rod Steiger film (and the subsequent Carol O'Conner TV version) of the same name. I only became aware of the book many years later having caught the movie again on TV I noticed in the credits it was based on a novel. I decided to seek out an audio version of the novel and was quite glad I did. The thing that most surprised me was the stark difference between the film and novel versions of the story. While the basic premise remains the same, and the film even takes many scenes and lines of dialogue (including the famous "MISTER Tibbs") verbatim from the novel, there is a dramatic difference in tone. In the film takes a back seat to rather heavy handed social commentary. The novel however is actually a cracking good detective story told in the grand tradition of Poe, Doyle and Christie's famous literary detectives. Ball is one of the "Baker Street Irregulars", a famous group of Sherlock Holmes fanatics and it shows here, Tibbs evokes intentional echoes of Holmes.

That is not to say the novel is without social commentary. The entire premise of a smart sophisticated eloquent black detective showing up a group of ignorant southern bumpkins must have been extremely controversial in 1965 when it was originally published. However Ball deftly handles this, much more so than Norman Jewison's film version. In the film both the Police Chief and Tibbs are stereotypes, almost cartoonishly so. While most remember Steiger's oscar winning turn as the sweaty racist backwoods police chief, most forget that Poitier does not really deliver a particularly subtle performance either. He plays the quintessential "angry black man" in an almost unhinged performance. In some ways it seems appropriate because he is only reacting to Steiger's treetment of him which is far worse than the book.

However Ball's novel is much more realistic and in doing so I think stands the test of time better. In Ball's book Tibbs is angry, to be sure, but his anger is always tightly controlled, just under the surface. Tibbs does not yell his famous line in the book , its instead delivered almost offhandedly. Tibbs characters both white and black understand their place in the social structure in which they find themselves. Remember in both versions Tibbs was supposedly raised in the south, he would certainly "know the score", he had also supposedly rose through the ranks in a mostly white police department in the 1950s and 1960s, hardly something which could be accomplished by an angry arrogant militant. Ball's Detective Tibbs is much more cordial and diplomatic, sure of himself and arrogant, but instead of raising his voice he forces the white racists to contend with his genius mind. He does things in a way in which it superficially seems he is serving them,when in reality all involved know he is putting them in their place. Ball's Tibbs does not think he will upend the southern social order, and does not try to. He , his ancestors named Holmes and Poitrot, doesn't solve the case to "show up " the whites, but does so because his intellect locks on to a problem with laser focus and once involved he simply cannot let it go unresolved. He is a pure intellectual.
Ball also bravely allows the characters to grow, both black and white, but only to a realistic degree. The white characters seem real, while they are racist only a few ancillary ones are cartoons. Gillespie and Wood are painted as ignorant, products of their upbringing, environment and egos, but not evil. In that they have the capacity to come to respect and like Tibbs, not because he yells at them or browbeats them, but because of his genius and constant professionalism.

Those fans of the film who expect to see the fireworks of the movie may come away disappointed, however mystery lovers may find an unexpected surprise. As for the social aspect, the novel, I feel anyway,may say a bit less, but is a much more realistic product of its time.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • We'll All Die in the Morning

  • By: J.T. McDaniel
  • Narrated by: J.T. McDaniel
  • Length: 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

Soon, an entire British army will climb out of their trenches to attack the German lines, only a few deadly yards away. For Lieutenant Oliver Black, this will be his third attack. He's wondering if his luck will hold. Only five of the original 30 platoon members are still with him. The rest have been killed, or so badly wounded they'll never return to the line. The replacements are green, mostly untried. One of them manages to get himself shot in the head only hours before the attack.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great short story.

  • By dogcow on 03-02-18

Great short story.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-18

The perfect length for a long commute to work. Interesting details only a Veteran could provide.

  • The Glitter Dome

  • By: Joseph Wambaugh
  • Narrated by: Adam Verner
  • Length: 10 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 36
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 28

In his finest, most compelling blend of wild humor and powerful drama, Joseph Wambaugh leads us into the Hollywood scene to demonstrate the effects of that heady, amoral world on four sets of police partners enmeshed in the glamour and the grime, the hustle and the horror. They live and work in a dizzying mix of moguls and starlets, elaborate parties, outrageous and sordid actions; a place where sex and drugs are open and the big deals are undercover.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • great sleazy fun

  • By dogcow on 05-28-17

great sleazy fun

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-28-17

darkly comic and sleaze-a-riffic, wambaugh really delivers the goods with this one. enjoyed it from start to finish

1 of 1 people found this review helpful