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  • Our Souls at Night

  • A Novel
  • By: Kent Haruf
  • Narrated by: Mark Bramhall
  • Length: 3 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,246
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,115
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,104

In the familiar setting of Holt, Colorado, home to all of Kent Haruf's inimitable fiction, Addie Moore pays an unexpected visit to a neighbor, Louis Waters. Her husband died years ago, as did his wife, and in such a small town they naturally have known of each other for decades; in fact, Addie was quite fond of Louis's wife.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Our Souls at Night is simply perfect.

  • By Bonny on 06-01-15

Eh....,

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-11-18

There’s a heaviness that pervades this book and pervades the near raider’s presentation of the book that never lightens, even when “Louis” genuinely (not to mention finally) begins to feel good about his life. I can’t tell if that’s how the author wanted it or if that’s the actor’s interpretation. But it drags in the middle because of that, in my opinion.
Along with that, I would’ve thought lewis would have learned something and would’ve become more proactive toward the end… Not in Hollywood type of way, but And someway to show that he found his voice; that he forgives himself for his past; and is now not just a remorseful follower.

It’s not that I wish I didn’t read it, but I don’t think I think a lot more about this book. it’s not his best. .

  • The Overstory

  • By: Richard Powers
  • Narrated by: Suzanne Toren
  • Length: 22 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 537
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 496
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 496

The Overstory unfolds in concentric rings of interlocking fable that range from antebellum New York to the late 20th-century Timber Wars of the Pacific Northwest and beyond. An air force loadmaster in the Vietnam War is shot out of the sky, then saved by falling into a banyan. An artist inherits 100 years of photographic portraits, all of the same doomed American chestnut. A hard-partying undergraduate in the late 1980s electrocutes herself, dies, and is sent back into life by creatures of air and light. A hearing- and speech-impaired scientist discovers that trees are communicating with one another.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Astonishingly powerful writing.

  • By Alexandria on 04-18-18

Such a good writer!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-12-18

...And SO well Narrated!
… And obviously enough can’t be said about the importance of this topic.

  • The Other End of the Leash

  • Why We Do What We Do Around Dogs
  • By: Patricia McConnell PhD
  • Narrated by: Ellen Archer
  • Length: 9 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 505
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 462
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 457

The Other End of the Leash shares a revolutionary new perspective on our relationship with dogs, focusing on our behavior in comparison with that of dogs. An applied animal behaviorist and dog trainer with more than 20 years of experience, Dr. Patricia McConnell looks at humans as just another interesting species, and muses about why we behave the way we do around our dogs, how dogs might interpret our behavior, and how to interact with our dogs in ways that bring out the best in them.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • awesome information

  • By Angie on 07-06-16

Very interesting and not so practical

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-13-18

Very interesting learning about canines and humans. If you’re looking for practical hands-on advice this isn’t the book for you but it is very interesting.

  • Manhattan Beach

  • A Novel
  • By: Jennifer Egan
  • Narrated by: Norbert Leo Butz, Heather Lind, Vincent Piazza
  • Length: 15 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,643
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,344
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,338

Anna Kerrigan, nearly 12 years old, accompanies her father to the house of a man who, she gleans, is crucial to the survival of her father and her family. Anna observes the uniformed servants, the lavishing of toys on the children, and some secret pact between her father and Dexter Styles. Years later her father has disappeared, and the country is at war. Anna works at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, where women are allowed to hold jobs that had always belonged to men.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Narrative of a Girl Diver

  • By WillowGirl313 on 10-30-17

Far better, far more complex and well written than some of her other books

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-24-18

I intensely dislike to some of her other books but this is a good read. And interesting historically. Great female character, refreshing to read about women like her.
Personally, I think the ending got messy; lost some continuity, and started making me think “really?” as the plot progressed through what I imagine would be the last hundred pages or so. It felt as if she wrote the first 3/4rs of the book, took a break for a couple years and tacked on an ending that had a different style to it; was suddenly more broken up. But that’s me. But the first 3/4 was fascinating.

  • Anything Is Possible

  • A Novel
  • By: Elizabeth Strout
  • Narrated by: Kimberly Farr
  • Length: 8 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,598
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,461
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,459

Here are two sisters: One trades self-respect for a wealthy husband while the other finds in the pages of a book a kindred spirit who changes her life. The janitor at the local school has his faith tested in an encounter with an isolated man he has come to help; a grown daughter longs for mother love even as she comes to accept her mother's happiness in a foreign country; and the adult Lucy Barton (the heroine of My Name Is Lucy Barton, the author's celebrated New York Times best seller) returns to visit her siblings after 17 years of absence.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Powerful & Disturbing

  • By Sara on 06-08-17

Elizabeth Strout’s books

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-28-18

I have thoroughly enjoyed two of her previous books, Olive Kittredge and Lucy Barton. This one should be read following Lucy Barton. It follows -which I hadn’t expected- But I just didn’t find it as fascinating as either Lucy Burton olive Kittredge. I love this authors writing style and the narrator is perfect. This particular book just didn’t hold my attention like those 2 others did. I may try it again, though, some day.

  • Look at Me

  • A Novel
  • By: Jennifer Egan
  • Narrated by: Rachael Warren
  • Length: 20 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 146
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 132
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 132

At the start of this edgy and ambitiously multilayered novel - a National Book Award Finalist - a fashion model named Charlotte Swenson emerges from a car accident in her Illinois hometown with her face so badly shattered that it takes 80 titanium screws to reassemble it. She returns to New York still beautiful but oddly unrecognizable. With the surreal authority of a David Lynch, Jennifer Egan threads Charlotte’s narrative with those of other casualties of our infatuation with the image.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Good story, horrible narrator.

  • By Denise on 09-19-12

Boring. A superficial read.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-15-18

I found this they seriously boring and trite book. And the reader added to this with her sing song he voice. I tolerated about an hour and a half of that and then had to return it

  • An Unfinished Life

  • By: Mark Spragg
  • Narrated by: Tony Amendola, Judith Marx
  • Length: 7 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 131
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 56
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 59

Jean Gilkyson is floundering in a trailer house in Iowa with yet another brutal boyfriend when she realizes this kind of life has got to stop, especially for the sake of her daughter, Griff. But the only place they can run to is Ishawooa, Wyoming, where Jean's loved ones are dead and her father-in-law, the only person who could take them in, wishes that she was, too.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An enjoyable story

  • By Marie E Nelson on 11-23-05

Lovely.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-31-17

.... And in my opinion a far better book than another book of his,Fruit of Stone.

Something about the way fruit of stone was written that’s just a little too precious. The writings excellent in this particular story. And this book, being read by actors, also make it read more smoothly than fruit of stone (which is read by the author).

  • A Little Life

  • A Novel
  • By: Hanya Yanagihara
  • Narrated by: Oliver Wyman
  • Length: 32 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,451
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,788
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 8,795

When four classmates from a small Massachusetts college move to New York to make their way, they're broke, adrift, and buoyed only by their friendship and ambition. There is kind, handsome Willem, an aspiring actor; JB, a quick-witted, sometimes cruel Brooklyn-born painter seeking entry to the art world; Malcolm, a frustrated architect at a prominent firm; and withdrawn, brilliant, enigmatic Jude, who serves as their center of gravity.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I had to call in SAD to work

  • By Angela on 10-17-15

Engrossing read; performed poignantly well.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-11-17

This book is not for the faint of heart, and sincerely, I wouldn't suggest reading it if you're depressed. A very sensitive portrayal of male relationships.
There were only 2 things that didn't fit for me w this otherwise exceptional book.
1. As a psychotherapist, I have s th to say abt the lead character and will do so trying hard to give away nothing abt the plot. Suffice it to say that unlike many readers, I was NOT alarmed by the progression of these peoples lives, including that of the main character. I did not feel we were duped or manipulated or that anybody was gratuitously or cheaply pulling on our heartstrings with the turns in the plot that occurred in the last 1/3 of the book. THAT SAID, this being set in the 21st-century, and with these characters being as educated and financially well-off as they were, it simply is not realistic to me that they would've ALL felt so profoundly disempowered abt helping the main character! ...For SO many years? Heck, they could've each paid CASH to get him in any of the best psych hospitals in the country. (not to mention, has anybody at LEAST heard of antidepressants?...which he would refuse but it would be a STEP ... one that any Doc on the face of the planet would take), not to mention that his friend/ DOC persisted on this course for how many decades? Good grief; psych care for PTSD... Sorry, but that's a no-brainer and would've change the course of his life.
BUT f one suspends disbelief and applies it to everyone of those characters, the story had depth and sensitivity that was quite moving, and increasingly realistic as the plot evolved in the last say, 1/2 of the book.

2. Minor point: The author made a point out of opening this massive book by describing the race and family history of the 4 major characters .... then that became completely irrelevant for the entire book. I kept thinking that would become very relevant. The point of that effort was lost on me.

Otherwise, an excellent novel.

  • Hillbilly Elegy

  • A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis
  • By: J. D. Vance
  • Narrated by: J. D. Vance
  • Length: 6 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37,210
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33,478
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33,409

Hillbilly Elegy is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis - that of white working-class Americans. The decline of this group, a demographic of our country that has been slowly disintegrating over 40 years, has been reported on with growing frequency and alarm but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enlightening!

  • By Gotta Tellya on 09-11-16

We all need to read this book.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-02-17

My Feedback is late to add to the mix since this book's been out a while but anyone who works in or studies social services or family law should read this book. I would also add that anyone Who is remotely considering dismantling our healthcare system, as our fearless leader is intent on doing,
Maybe even for the first half of the should also read this book.
Thee very thing that I found to be its weak point for the first third of the book ended up becoming A poignant addition: this memoir is narrated by the author. Initially because he is so familiar with the material he'd sometimes scramble through it a bit too rapidly (Or perhaps it was an editing problem but I don't think so). But for the last half of the book that became a complete non-issue. There something about hearing him at the end of the book saying "thank you for reading this book" that was gut wrenching.
Very sensitively written, but more important, the author gives his personal take on what can be done--no worries (for those of you who want the gripping memoir:) not in a tedious way. This adds to the depth of the book.

  • Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay

  • The Neapolitan Novels, Book 3
  • By: Elena Ferrante
  • Narrated by: Hillary Huber
  • Length: 16 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,050
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,846
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,843

In this third Neapolitan novel, Elena and Lila, the two girls whom were first introduced in My Brilliant Friend, have become women. Lila married at sixteen and has a young son; she has left her husband and the comforts her marriage brought and now works as a common laborer. Elena has left the neighborhood, earned her college degree, and published a successful novel, all of which has opened the doors to a world of learned interlocutors and richly furnished salons.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • DOING AND THINKING

  • By CHET YARBROUGH on 07-30-15

On and on and on and on… Then finally some transformation and growth

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-11-17

I have to be honest. I don't see what all the hoopla is about about this four book series.

How many times did Elena declare "I will (this) and I will (that)!" To be followed by "but I didn't." And then finally, 3/4 of the way through this book "but of course I didnt." Tedious. Repetitive. Just like I found in the first book. Then finally some transformation and growth but seriously folks, 3/4 of the way into the third book? Ironically ELena wrote the shortest books. Where was this author's editor? I'm definitely going to finish the four book series. There is important learning about the time. And the place and all the National and of course even international events going on at that time. but I sincerely do not understand all of the hoopla about this series. Shorten it to one wonderful long read and it would be fabulous.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful