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  • 11
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  • The Guns of August

  • By: Barbara W. Tuchman
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 18 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,261
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,119
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,120

Historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Barbara Tuchman here brought to life again the people and events that led up to World War I. With attention to fascinating detail, and an intense knowledge of her subject and its characters, Ms. Tuchman reveals, for the first time, just how the war started, why, and why it could have been stopped but wasn't. A classic historical survey of a time and a people we all need to know more about, The Guns of August will not be forgotten.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Pay attention!

  • By Chrissie on 07-11-13

wonderful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-21-18

The guns of august is one of the best books on the first world war, I probably don't need to tell anyone that, it's effectively axiomatic at this point. I would like to note that the performance was very good. The use of various accents by the narrator seemed a little cheesy at first, but I found it to be extremely helpful at keeping a firm grasp on what nation is being refereed to. I very much enjoyed it.

  • Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World

  • By: Jack Weatherford
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis, Jack Weatherford
  • Length: 14 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,977
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,653
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,668

The Mongol army led by Genghis Khan subjugated more lands and people in 25 years than the Romans did in 400. In nearly every country the Mongols conquered, they brought an unprecedented rise in cultural communication, expanded trade, and a blossoming of civilization.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant, insightful, intriguing.

  • By Peter on 03-05-10

one half of a story

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-28-18

do to the rough treatment of the mongols in history up to the 20th century, this book endeavors to flip the narrative and talk about only the good things about genghis and his mongols. this is a side of the story that needs to be talked about, but he really glosses over the millions of deaths and rapes that occurred during the conquests. so I would call this book good, but one sided.

  • Homer Box Set: Iliad & Odyssey

  • By: Homer, W. H. D. Rouse - translator
  • Narrated by: Anthony Heald
  • Length: 25 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,506
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,380
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,379

Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey are unquestionably two of the greatest epic masterpieces in Western literature. Though more than 2,700 years old, their stories of brave heroics, capricious gods, and towering human emotions are vividly timeless. The Iliad can justly be called the world’s greatest war epic. The terrible and long-drawn-out siege of Troy remains one of the classic campaigns. The Odyssey chronicles the many trials and adventures Odysseus must pass through on his long journey home from the Trojan wars to his beloved wife.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Revisit the Classics

  • By The Kindler on 07-28-16

a must listen, no way around it

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-31-17

If you think you would like these books then you should just pull the trigger. This recording is great and the story its self is of course wonderful.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Storm Before the Storm

  • The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic
  • By: Mike Duncan
  • Narrated by: Mike Duncan
  • Length: 10 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 3,404
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3,149
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 3,131

The Roman Republic was one of the most remarkable achievements in the history of civilization. After its founding in 509 BCE, the Romans refused to allow a single leader to seize control of the state and grab absolute power. The Roman commitment to cooperative government and peaceful transfers of power was unmatched in the history of the ancient world. But by the year 133 BCE, the republican system was unable to cope with the vast empire Rome now ruled.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting, albeit a bit dry

  • By Aria on 11-14-17

Beautiful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-25-17

This was just the kind of engaging narrative and scholarly incite I have come to expect from the wonderful mind of Mike Duncan. To all fans of ether of his podcasts; GET THIS BOOK NOW!!!! Great narration and good choice in historical story. Now if you'll excuse me I'm going to listen to it again.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

  • By: Edward Gibbon
  • Narrated by: Charlton Griffin
  • Length: 126 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 417
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 383
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 379

Here in a single volume is the entire, unabridged recording of Gibbon's masterpiece. Beginning in the second century A.D. at the apex of the Pax Romana, Gibbon traces the arc of decline and complete destruction through the centuries across Europe and the Mediterranean. It is a thrilling and cautionary tale of splendor and ruin, of faith and hubris, and of civilization and barbarism. Follow along as Christianity overcomes paganism... before itself coming under intense pressure from Islam.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The European Civilization

  • By Marcus on 03-03-16

For the hardest core history fans only

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-23-17

I loved all of it, but I wouldn't recommend it to anyone that I know. 126 hours of meandering through the Roman decline told by a man from 1787, having all of the prejudices you would expect, was for me a lot of fun but most people who are humans and have ears would likely rip them off half way through the work. But if your reading this review you probably fall into the group of people who enjoy this kind of thing, and in that case I would recommend it just for the satisfaction of beating this book! It's great, just do it.

30 of 31 people found this review helpful