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  • Island of the Mad

  • By: Laurie R. King
  • Narrated by: Jenny Sterlin
  • Length: 11 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 599
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 546
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 547

With Mrs. Hudson gone from their lives and domestic chaos building, the last thing Mary Russell and her husband, Sherlock Holmes, need is to help an old friend with her mad and missing aunt. Lady Vivian Beaconsfield has spent most of her adult life in one asylum after another, since the loss of her brother and father in the Great War. And although her mental state seemed to be improving, she’s now disappeared after an outing from Bethlem Royal Hospital...better known as Bedlam.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • a little let down but still worth the listen.

  • By Victoria L Snyder on 07-03-18

Laurie R. King and Jenny Stirlin deliver gold

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

The wit, erudition and heart of Laurie R. King combined with Jenny Stirlin's beguiling and multifaceted narration deliver another fascinating listen in the Mary Russell series. Whether you are a longtime fan or new to the Russell stories, you will find much to savor in this story. It's a romp that takes Russell to London's Bedlam institution (posing as an inmate) and Holmes to meet Cole Porter at his Venice Palazzo (posing as an itinerant violinist). There is humor and suspense and a thoughtful look at issues of mental health, Fascism, and maintaining one's identity in the face of prejudice.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • An Argumentation of Historians

  • The Chronicles of St. Mary's, Book 9
  • By: Jodi Taylor
  • Narrated by: Zara Ramm
  • Length: 12 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1,060
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 983
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 974

They say you shouldn't push your luck. Max gives her own luck a massive shove every day - and it's only a matter of time until luck pushes back.... January, 1536 - the day of Henry VIII's infamous jousting accident. Historians from St Mary's are there in force, recording and documenting. And arguing - obviously. A chance meeting between Max and the Time Police leads to a plan of action. And it's one that will have very serious consequences - especially for Max.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Re-download for final chapter

  • By Townsend on 04-13-18

Never disappointed by this series!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-15-18

Would you listen to An Argumentation of Historians again? Why?

Yes, I occasionally listen to the entire series in order again; even though I know how a particular plot ends, I still laugh out loud at the writing and am moved by the character development. Zara Ramm does an amazing job differentiating the characters and her comic timing is impeccable. Jodi Taylor writes no two-dimensional characters, not even the villains or the bureaucratic martinets.

What other book might you compare An Argumentation of Historians to and why?

Possibly the Oxford Time Travel series, though they are less humorous, but the characters take precedence over the plot, which I always appreciate.

Have you listened to any of Zara Ramm’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Every previous book in this series; I would love to discover other work she has done.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I laughed frequently, and did get a bit misty in places, but having listened to the other offerings, I am confident that Our Intrepid Heroine will make it through. But if Jodi Taylor pulls a J.K. Rowling and kills off Dr. Bearstow, I will not be composed about it.

Any additional comments?

Taking a chance on the first book in this series was one of the best impulse buys I've ever made. I would encourage anyone who appreciates thoughtful character development, clever and articulate writing, outstanding narration and screwball comedy in the same book (not a frequent occurrence in my experience) to start with No Time Like the Past.