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J. Kahn

  • 22
  • reviews
  • 119
  • helpful votes
  • 48
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  • The Warmth of Other Suns

  • The Epic Story of America's Great Migration
  • By: Isabel Wilkerson
  • Narrated by: Robin Miles, Ken Burns (introduction)
  • Length: 22 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,318
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3,842
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,828

In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize–winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities in search of a better life. From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America. Wilkerson interviewed more than a thousand people, and gained access to previously untapped data and official records, to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, altering our cities, our country, and ourselves.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One of the most amazing books I have ever read!

  • By Ernest on 04-09-12

Serious Download Issue

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-02-19

Among the five star reviews, several complained that the book was repetitive. Indeed it is. Only one reader caught that at chapter 31, there are introductory remarks by Ken Burns and the book begins all over again. I’ve complained to customer service, but this is a production flaw and the book needs to be either re-recorded or reorganized.

The many listeners who raved about it probably weren’t paying attention as they listened in the car or were otherwise multitasking.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Witch Elm

  • A Novel
  • By: Tana French
  • Narrated by: Paul Nugent
  • Length: 22 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,087
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,809
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3,794

Toby is a happy-go-lucky charmer who's dodged a scrape at work and is celebrating with friends when the night takes a turn that will change his life - he surprises two burglars who beat him and leave him for dead. Struggling to recover from his injuries, beginning to understand that he might never be the same man again, he takes refuge at his family's ancestral home to care for his dying uncle Hugo. Then a skull is found in the trunk of an elm tree in the garden - and as detectives close in, Toby is forced to face the possibility that his past may not be what he has always believed.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Yes, the Main Character Comes Off Poorly, But...

  • By Marina on 10-19-18

Simply Too Wordy

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-04-18

A belated coming of age and family drama, mystery, and police procedural, this is a first-person narrative by Toby Hennessy, a privileged Dublin millennial who finds himself in the middle of a murder controversy in the home of a beloved uncle. Toby, a carefree PR manager in a trendy art gallery, succumbs to a horrific beating during a burglary in his home that leaves him disoriented and with a dodgy memory.

After a skeleton is found in the trunk of a witch elm, Toby, his two cousins and even the kindly uncle are suspects. The bulk—and I mean bulk—of the plot is a psychological investigation of the characters of the suspects and their lifelong interactions.

The trouble is that Toby has recovered his memory all right, page after page of dialogue from trivial pub banter to police interviews to bitching among the three cousins.

I guess French thought the endless talk and Toby’s navel gazing would obscure the denouement, which was predictable about two thirds in. She may be a superstar in Ireland but she needed a good editor, preferably of the slash and burn persuasion.

  • Lethal White

  • A Cormoran Strike Novel
  • By: Robert Galbraith
  • Narrated by: Robert Glenister
  • Length: 22 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,984
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6,611
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,580

When Billy, a troubled young man, comes to private eye Cormoran Strike's office to ask for his help investigating a crime he thinks he witnessed as a child, Strike is left deeply unsettled. While Billy is obviously mentally distressed, and cannot remember many concrete details, there is something sincere about him and his story. But before Strike can question him further, Billy bolts from his office in a panic. Trying to get to the bottom of Billy's story, Strike and Robin Ellacott - once his assistant, now a partner in the agency - set off on a twisting trail that leads them through the backstreets of London....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best 22 hours of the last week

  • By Jennifer on 09-27-18

Too Long, Repetitive, Boring Plot

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-13-18

Yeah, I slogged through this because I’d read the previous ones, but if I have to read one more description of Strike’s prosthesis problems or Robin’s insecurities, I’ll scream.

Galbraith/Rowling’s creative juices seem to have an evil spell cast on them. Stick with wizards and leave the thriller world to the pros.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • How Democracies Die

  • By: Steven Levitsky, Daniel Ziblatt
  • Narrated by: Fred Sanders
  • Length: 8 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,096
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 981
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 977

Donald Trump's presidency has raised a question that many of us never thought we'd be asking: Is our democracy in danger? Harvard professors Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt have spent two decades studying the breakdown of democracies in Europe and Latin America, and they believe the answer is yes. Democracy no longer ends with a bang - in a revolution or military coup - but with a whimper: the slow, steady weakening of critical institutions, such as the judiciary and the press, and the gradual erosion of long-standing political norms.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Connecting the Dots

  • By Sharon F on 02-06-18

A Must-Read for All Americans

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-01-18

This book recounts the history of democracies, their strengths and particularly their weaknesses. It describes in detail the insidiousness of the many different political and social circumstances that have threatened our own fragile democracy and how we can attempt to counteract polarization.

Perhaps the most important point of the authors’ thesis is that we are held together by a collection of unwritten standards of political discourse and behavior which, have broken down and cannot be rescued by recourse to our Constitution.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • American Radical

  • Inside the World of an Undercover Muslim FBI Agent
  • By: Tamer Elnoury, Kevin Maurer
  • Narrated by: Peter Ganim
  • Length: 9 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1,625
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,509
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,505

It's no secret that federal agencies are waging a broad global war against terror. But, for the first time, in this memoir, an active Muslim American federal agent reveals his experience infiltrating and bringing down a terror cell in North America. Due to his ongoing work for the FBI, Elnoury writes under a pseudonym. An Arabic-speaking Muslim American, a patriot, a hero: To many Americans, it will be a revelation that he and his team even exist, let alone the vital and dangerous work they do keeping all Americans safe.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • America is Everyone

  • By Amazon Customer on 11-09-17

At Last, a Narrator Takes Foreign Pronunciation Seriously

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-20-17

Special kudos to the narrator, who either knows Arabic or took the time to learn how to pronounce it.

  • Manhattan Beach

  • A Novel
  • By: Jennifer Egan
  • Narrated by: Norbert Leo Butz, Heather Lind, Vincent Piazza
  • Length: 15 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,817
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,502
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,497

Anna Kerrigan, nearly 12 years old, accompanies her father to the house of a man who, she gleans, is crucial to the survival of her father and her family. Anna observes the uniformed servants, the lavishing of toys on the children, and some secret pact between her father and Dexter Styles. Years later her father has disappeared, and the country is at war. Anna works at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, where women are allowed to hold jobs that had always belonged to men.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Narrative of a Girl Diver

  • By WillowGirl313 on 10-30-17

Soppy and sentimental

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-13-17

I read this book because I was interested in the unusual historical take on the War. The descriptions of diving and sea battle were well researched and interesting. But the plot was convoluted and sentimental with too many coincidences. Instead of writing in the language the characters would have used, Egan embellished the third person narrative voice with the kind of literary and metaphoric language one might find in a ladies' Victorian romance. All in all, full of literary dissonance.

The readers were only fair. Anna's character was rendered even more soppy by the febrile excitement of the reader, whose lisp seemed oddly artificial and annoying. The male reader was simply bland, unable to breathe life into the diverse cast of characters he had to portray.

13 of 15 people found this review helpful

  • 4 3 2 1

  • A Novel
  • By: Paul Auster
  • Narrated by: Paul Auster
  • Length: 36 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 509
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 466
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 469

Nearly two weeks early, on March 3, 1947, in the maternity ward of Beth Israel Hospital in Newark, New Jersey, Archibald Isaac Ferguson, the one and only child of Rose and Stanley Ferguson, is born. From that single beginning, Ferguson's life will take four simultaneous and independent fictional paths. Four identical Fergusons made of the same DNA, four boys who are the same boy, go on to lead four parallel and entirely different lives. Family fortunes diverge. Athletic skills and sex lives and friendships and intellectual passions contrast.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Too much detail.

  • By Jax on 03-03-17

Boring and unoriginal

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-16-17

Thank god Audible let's you return books. The premise was interesting but it turned out to be another Bildungsroman of an uninteresting adolescent and all that implies. Read Philip Roth instead. I couldn't get halfway through the 37 hours.

7 of 15 people found this review helpful

  • It Can't Happen Here

  • By: Sinclair Lewis
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 14 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,236
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,140
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,138

Doremus Jessup, a newspaper editor, is dismayed to find that many of the people he knows support presidential candidate Berzelius Windrip. The suspiciously fascist Windrip is offering to save the nation from sex, crime, welfare cheats, and a liberal press. But after Windrip wins the election, dissent soon becomes dangerous for Jessup. Windrip forcibly gains control of Congress and the Supreme Court and, with the aid of his personal paramilitary storm troopers, turns the United States into a totalitarian state.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Rise of American Authoritarianism

  • By David S. Mathew on 11-21-16

It just has!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-20-17

As prescient as it was in 1935, this book should go to the top of everyone's reading list in 2017.

10 of 20 people found this review helpful

  • All the Pretty Horses

  • The Border Trilogy, Book One
  • By: Cormac McCarthy
  • Narrated by: Frank Muller
  • Length: 10 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,985
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,831
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,817

Sixteen-year-old John Grady Cole's grandfather has just died, his parents have permanently separated, and the family ranch, upon which he had placed so many boyish hopes, has been sold. Rootless and increasingly restive, Cole leaves Texas, accompanied by his friend Lacey Rawlins, and begins a journey across the vaquero frontier into the badlands of northern Mexico.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Very Slow

  • By Sarah Symonds Chapin on 08-18-17

I tried to like this "classic"

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-15-17

I've always avoided Cormac McCarthy because I'm not really interested in coming of age stories in the west. I read it because it was mentioned so many times as a paragon in a French literary novel about a bookstore in Paris that sells only "good novels." I figured I ought at least to try it. I'm sorry I did. The performance was pretty good, apparently better than the unpunctuated print version. But it was just another trite plot, Hemingway short sentences and endless description of every move the main character makes. I lost count of the Number of times McCormick writes "he spat".

14 of 17 people found this review helpful

  • Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?

  • By: Frans de Waal
  • Narrated by: Sean Runnette
  • Length: 10 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,024
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 907
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 900

De Waal reviews the rise and fall of the mechanistic view of animals and opens our minds to the idea that animal minds are far more intricate and complex than we have assumed. De Waal's landmark work will convince you to rethink everything you thought you knew about animal - and human - intelligence.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Finally the science catches up

  • By Philomath on 05-07-16

How do animals know

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-14-17

Fascinating study of animal cognition and evolutionary cognition. The many convincing descriptions of scientific experiments of animals along almost the entire evolutionary scale outweighs a tendency to preach and be defensive about the field.