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Andrew Reid

Sydney, Australia
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The Code of the Woosters audiobook cover art
  • The Code of the Woosters

  • By: P. G. Wodehouse
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Cecil
  • Length: 7 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 13

Take Gussie Fink-Nottle, the soupy Madeline Bassett, old Pop Bassett, the unscrupulous Stiffy Byng, the Rev. H.P. ('Stinker') Pinker, an eighteenth-century cow-creamer, a small brown leather-covered notebook, and mix well with a liberal dose of aged relative Aunt Dahlia, and there you have it, a dangerous brew which spells toil and trouble for Bertie and some serious thinking for Jeeves.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Great performance marred by the quality of the recording

  • By Roberto Brazao Gomes on 06-08-16

Excellent narration marred by uneven audio quality

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-08-18

Excellent narration of what is one of the best Jeeves and Wooster stories. audio quality is a bit iffy. very low volume in places.

  • The Tango Briefing

  • Quiller, Book 5
  • By: Adam Hall
  • Narrated by: Antony Ferguson
  • Length: 7 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9

London Bureau sends Quiller to the Sahara desert on a mission to examine a crashed freighter and its mysterious cargo. The danger to Quiller comes not only from the cargo itself and from political cells trying to capture Quiller, but also from his own Bureau's secret plans. The majesty and terrors of the desert are brought into sharp focus in this captivating novel about the character The New York Times called "the greatest survival expert among contemporary secret agents".

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One of the best Quillers

  • By Andrew Reid on 08-09-18

One of the best Quillers

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-09-18

one of the best of the Quiller tales. Suspensful and claustrophobic. The narration has a tense, stiff-upper-lip quality that suits the material well.

  • Falling Free

  • By: Lois McMaster Bujold
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 8 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,771
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,456
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,468

Leo Graf was just your average highly efficient engineer: mind your own business, fix what's wrong, and move on to the next job. But all that changed on his assignment to the Cay Habitat, where a group of humanoids had been secretly, commercially bioengineered for working in free fall. Could he just stand there and allow the exploitation of hundreds of helpless children merely to enhance the bottom line of a heartless mega-corporation?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Don't read this one first

  • By Carol on 02-20-13

fun, slightly old fashioned.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-25-17

Likely the best account of Zero-G welding techniques you'll read this year. extra words needed.

  • The Last Wish

  • By: Andrzej Sapkowski
  • Narrated by: Peter Kenny
  • Length: 10 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 930
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 879
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 878

Geralt is a witcher, a man whose magic powers, enhanced by long training and a mysterious elixir, have made him a brilliant fighter and a merciless assassin. Yet he is no ordinary murderer: his targets are the multifarious monsters and vile fiends that ravage the land and attack the innocent. He roams the country seeking assignments, but gradually comes to realise that while some of his quarry are unremittingly vile, vicious grotesques, others are the victims of sin, evil or simple naivety.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Spectacular Introduction to "The Witcher"

  • By Renell on 09-10-15

Geralt of the nights watch

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-05-17

The first thing that strikes you about this audiobook is Peter Kenny's decision to voice Geralt (the lead character) as a convincing impersonation of Jon Snow from the Game of Thrones TV show. As someone familiar with video game Geralt this took a little getting used to, but I soon did and actually came to like it by the end of the book.

  • The Land Across

  • By: Gene Wolfe
  • Narrated by: Jeff Woodman
  • Length: 10 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 90
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 86
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 83

An American writer of travel guides in need of a new location chooses to travel to a small and obscure Eastern European country. The moment Grafton crosses the border he is in trouble, much more than he could have imagined. His passport is taken by guards, and then he is detained for not having it. He is released into the custody of a family, but is again detained. It becomes evident that there are supernatural agencies at work.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Give the man a (dead) hand

  • By Tango on 11-29-13

Complex story is well-read but a bit frustrating

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-01-15

Any additional comments?

Firstly, I admit that listening to a Wolfe novel for the first time as an audiobook may not be ideal. Wolfe stories are complex, and losing the ability to flip back a few pages to check things probably means I missed more details than I might have otherwise. The narration in this book is excellent, however.

The plot involves a young American journalist traveling to a mysterious east-european country where he is imprisoned by the police, is kidnapped, escapes, is recaptured and eventually ends up solving crimes on their behalf. All of this is overlaid with occult and ghost elements.

As might be imagined, the plot gets complicated and hard to follow. It seems like the story ends abruptly with a lot of loose ends but I'm hesitant in claiming that they're really loose. I'll probably understand things better on a re-read/listen.

I must admit to feeling the same slight disappointment with this book as I've felt with all Wolfe novels since The Wizard Knight. There are some commonalities in these later works that I personally find irritating.

Firstly, the personality of the narrator. Other reviewers have mentioned that the voice of the first person narrator sounds weirdly old-fashioned, like a high-school footballer from a 50's sitcom. It sounds oddly out of place in a story set in the present day.

Secondly is the portrayal of the female characters, who all inexplicably want to sleep with the narrator. I was especially disheartened when this happened even with an otherwise convincing and well-drawn character around the middle of the story.

Thirdly, there is a lot more of what I've started to call "sitting around being clever". This started in the Long Sun books and has got worse since. Basically, the characters spend pages and pages talking (in cafes in this book) to each other explaining how they worked things out, saying stuff like "I'll answer that in a minute but first I want to talk about...". Infuriating.

If you're a fan of Wolfe classics like the Long/Short/New Sun series you'll find this a very different beast, and may not enjoy it as much. If you've enjoyed more recent Wolfe works like The Sorcerer's House and An Evil Guest, then you'll probably find The Land Across entertaining.

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