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H. Currimbhoy

  • 6
  • reviews
  • 5
  • helpful votes
  • 8
  • ratings
  • Time Reborn

  • From the Crisis in Physics to the Future of the Universe
  • By: Lee Smolin
  • Narrated by: Sean Pratt
  • Length: 10 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 253
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 224
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 230

The Trouble with Physics argues that a limited notion of time is holding physics back. It's time for a major revolution in scientific thought. The reality of time could be the key to the next big breakthrough in theoretical physics. What if the laws of physics themselves were not timeless? What if they could evolve? Time Reborn offers a radical new approach to cosmology that embraces the reality of time and opens up a whole new universe of possibilities.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Probably the best Science book I've listened to

  • By Gary on 07-29-13

Pretty deep and easy to loose me, but brilliant thinking

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-17-19

I enjoyed this book, it felt like it was less about time and more about narrowing down options around what makes up our universe and reality. I got lost a lot and had to rewind almost every chapter. But Smolin is a visionary and I loved being challenged. Def worth the effort. I will re- listen in the future !

  • When Einstein Walked with Gödel

  • Excursions to the Edge of Thought
  • By: Jim Holt
  • Narrated by: David Stifel
  • Length: 15 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 271
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 252
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 254

Does time exist? What is infinity? Why do mirrors reverse left and right but not up and down? In this scintillating collection, Holt explores the human mind, the cosmos, and the thinkers who’ve tried to encompass the latter with the former. With his trademark clarity and humor, Holt probes the mysteries of quantum mechanics, the quest for the foundations of mathematics, and the nature of logic and truth. Along the way, he offers intimate biographical sketches of celebrated and neglected thinkers, from the physicist Emmy Noether to the computing pioneer Alan Turing and the discoverer of fractals, Benoit Mandelbrot.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A good overview of scientific theory

  • By Tracy Rowan on 09-11-18

Very hard to put down

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-29-18

The title is a bit misleading, but Jim Holt runs through so many of the great philisophical questions that science has pondered for years. short chapters get to the point and offered references to thinkers and scientists I had not heard of (and I like to think I read a lot of science and philsophy books!). Essays on creativity, the possible demise of the universe, gravity theories, mathematical conundrums and the mis-naming of phenomenon are all just fascinating. I found it hard to put down and wanted to tell friends about it. The narrator is great too - has a good way with jokes to lighten some of the heavy going.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • AI Superpowers

  • China, Silicon Valley, and the New World Order
  • By: Kai-Fu Lee
  • Narrated by: Mikael Naramore
  • Length: 9 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,863
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,612
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,609

In his provocative new book, Dr. Kai-Fu Lee - one of the world’s most respected experts on artificial intelligence - reveals that China has suddenly caught up to the US, the leader in AI, at an astonishingly rapid pace. Building upon his longstanding US-Sino technology career (working at Apple, Microsoft, and Google) and his much-heralded New York Times Op-Ed from June 2017, Dr. Lee predicts that Chinese and American AI will have a stunning impact on not just traditional blue-collar industries but will also have a devastating effect on white-collar professions.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Mad-Max vs Gladiator vs Mother Theresa?

  • By Matthew Duncan on 10-05-18

Some good insights

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-21-18

I learned about the ways China has been iterating and studying AI for some time, making them neck and neck with American advancements. One or two good insights into how AI might be used to further divide society, if not developed with humanity. But it’s a very personal take, with the author learning late in life that love and family are actually important. I’m glad he got there because many don’t. His journey is similar to what AI has to go through in some ways. Did anyone else think the narrator was an AI?

  • How Not to F*ck Up Your Kids Too Bad

  • By: Stephen Marche
  • Narrated by: Stephen Marche
  • Length: 5 hrs and 4 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 108
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 97
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 97

Modern parenting is in a complicated place. By some estimates, fathers today spend seven times more time parenting than their dads did. And while there are a ton of parenting books, writer Stephen Marche says that most are aimed at women and are designed to make them feel like they are doing something wrong. Enter How Not to F*ck Up Your Kids Too Bad, an Audible Original. 

Across 10 chapters, Marche talks to real fathers and experts about thorny contemporary questions. He tackles everything from why yelling may be as bad as spanking to how to share your favorite childhood books (especially when they are a little racist) and how to talk to your kids about marijuana and porn in a way that won’t mess them up as adults…at least not too much. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • So good

  • By Charles on 05-31-18

The one thing that changed how I am as a father

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-13-18

This book gave me a piece of advice that has changed me as a new parent: I do not use my phone or computer around my kid any more. Or at least, way, way less, and only when I have to. Thanks to this book I realized how kids seriously are effected by parents constantly staring at a screen, being there but not present at all. Its damaging and weird to be on our phones and not be paying attention to our kids, especially as fathers. We get a couple of hours here and there with our kids and we spend half of that time distracted by often total nonsense (social media, an email or text that can certainly wait) when our kids need affirmation, support, EYE contact. The book over all is a fun read, handles some questions I had not even thought of and gives real life insight with a good interviewer/host. There are no magic bullets. Just read/listen to this book and it will make you more conscious of your job. that's enough for me!

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Sapiens

  • A Brief History of Humankind
  • By: Yuval Noah Harari
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 15 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25,818
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 22,792
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22,636

Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Should be required reading

  • By Blue Zion on 12-22-18

Human story, but lacks humanity

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-28-18

Epic story of human beings makes clear that our basic needs have inspired grand illusions such as society, religion, money. They have formed us as much as we formed them. It’s a fascinating read that brings the factual mind of a scientist to the detail the structures of “what” and “why” we are. It just lacks a bit of humanity in the writing. The most touching parts are reserved for domesticated animals. By the end it’s sobering but I didn’t like the simplistic descriptions of the wooly mammoth project and the brief hints to singularity. These most important journeys in human evolution are the frontiers if science and the end of the writers engagement.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • How to Build a Car

  • By: Adrian Newey
  • Narrated by: Richard Trinder
  • Length: 12 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 421
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 384
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 385

The world's foremost designer in Formula One, Adrian Newey OBE is arguably one of Britain's greatest engineers and this is his fascinating, powerful memoir. How to Build a Car explores the story of Adrian's unrivalled 35-year career in Formula One through the prism of the cars he has designed, the drivers he has worked alongside and the races in which he's been involved.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Must for any F1 or racing fan

  • By TohirT on 09-21-18

One of my favorite books on racing

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-20-18

If you could sum up How to Build a Car in three words, what would they be?

Personal story of passion

Who was your favorite character and why?

Senna. Some great insight into his driving style and personality. Though Newey himself comes out as quite an unpredictable man of genius

Which scene was your favorite?

Newey crashing into things.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

yes for sure. but then I loved stretching it out. didn't want it to end

Any additional comments?

Racing fans should read this