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Jared T Wilsey

  • 12
  • reviews
  • 118
  • helpful votes
  • 60
  • ratings
  • Bad Advice

  • Or Why Celebrities, Politicians, and Activists Aren't Your Best Source of Health Information
  • By: Paul A. Offit MD
  • Narrated by: Patrick Lawlor
  • Length: 8 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11

Science doesn't speak for itself. Neck-deep in work that can be messy and confounding and naïve in the ways of public communication, scientists are often unable to package their insights into the neat narratives that the public requires. Enter celebrities, advocates, lobbyists, and the funders behind them, who take advantage of scientists' reluctance to provide easy answers, flooding the media with misleading or incorrect claims about health risks. In Bad Advice, Paul A. Offit shares hard-earned wisdom on the dos and don'ts of battling misinformation.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Important and Engaging

  • By mobius_spider on 03-22-19

Dr. Offit is one of my heroes.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-06-19

Very much enjoyed learning of his experiences in his brave defense of science and critical thinking. Pretty sad that that requires bravery, but I digress. A lot of otherwise smart people have fallen for the load of s*&^ about vaccines. Are vaccines 100% safe? No, of course not. But it is difficult to think of any medical treatment with a superior risk benefit profile, or one that has saved so many young lives. You can’t blame “the republicans” or red states for this special breed of science denial. Idiocy cuts across the political spectrum, but have to give liberals the edge on this one.

  • Can Science be a Business? Lessons from Biotech (Harvard Business Review)

  • By: Gary Pisano
  • Narrated by: Todd Mundt
  • Length: 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 16
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 7

In 1976, Genentech, the first biotechnology company, was founded by a young venture capitalist and a university professor to exploit recombinant DNA technology. Thirty years and more than $300 billion in investments later, only a handful of biotech firms have matched Genentech's success or even shown a profit. This disappointing performance raises a question: Can organizations motivated by the need to make profits and please shareholders successfully conduct basic scientific research as a core activity?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • As applicable in 2018 as 2006. . .

  • By Jared T Wilsey on 07-21-18

As applicable in 2018 as 2006. . .

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-21-18

This could have been written last week, which is slightly depressing. Nevertheless, it a concise description of the (ongoing) challenges in pharmaceutical development, including the misalignment of the time required to bring an NCE to market and the time horizons of investors. The model for improving R&D productivity is interesting, but 12 years later I do not believe we are any closer to removing major obstacles. No wonder smart phones and tablets are improving way faster than medicine.

  • Pick Your Poison

  • How Our Mad Dash to Chemical Utopia is Making Lab Rats of Us All
  • By: Monona Rossol
  • Narrated by: Christine Williams
  • Length: 8 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8

Did you know that "nontoxic" usually means "never tested"? Or that many green cleaners are good for the environment but terrible for you? Chemist and activist Monona Rossol goes from under your sink to the halls of the powerful, tracing Americas love affair with chemicals that kill, explaining how much worse the problem has gotten in the last decade. Shocking and appalling and completely reckless - thats how she describes the current prevalence of harmful chemicals in our everyday lives. Read Pick Your Poison to learn the facts and find out what you can do about the daily onslaught of toxins that are making lab rats of us all.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • (Mostly) fact based

  • By Jared T Wilsey on 03-12-18

(Mostly) fact based

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-12-18

This was not the left wing conspiracy rant I feared, the information was consistent with my understanding of the evidence. Monona made solid arguments for tighter consumer good regulations in the US, at least matching the EU. She definitely understands the basic science, although the book was written to be easily understood by a layperson. Overall pleasantly surprised and persuaded.

  • Doctored

  • The Disillusionment of an American Physician
  • By: Sandeep Jauhar
  • Narrated by: Patrick Lawlor
  • Length: 10 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 55
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 45
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 45

Hoping for the stability he needs to start a family, Sandeep Jauhar, an attending cardiologist, accepts a position at a massive teaching hospital on the outskirts of Queens. With a decade's worth of elite medical training behind him, he is eager to settle down and reap the rewards of countless sleepless nights. Instead, he is confronted with sobering truths. Doctors' morale is low and getting lower.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Frank, inside perspective on the follies of unintended consequences in medical reform

  • By Jared T Wilsey on 02-25-18

Frank, inside perspective on the follies of unintended consequences in medical reform

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-25-18

It is also a personal story, touching on the common midlife crisis and search for professional meaning as a career in medicine did not turn quite as expected. The reality of skewed incentives in the field, overdiagnosis, and over-treatment does not get the publicity of under-access to healthcare, although they probably are related. Reviewers who accuse the author of *&^ing that he does not make enough money either completely missed the point or did not finish the book.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Less Medicine, More Health

  • 7 Assumptions That Drive Too Much Medical Care
  • By: H. Gilbert Welch
  • Narrated by: L. J. Ganser
  • Length: 8 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 65
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 59
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 59

The author of the highly acclaimed Overdiagnosed describes seven widespread assumptions that encourage excessive, often ineffective, and sometimes harmful medical care. You might think the biggest problem in medical care is that it costs too much. Or that health insurance is too expensive, too uneven, too complicated - and gives you too many forms to fill out. But the central problem is that too much medical care has too little value.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The truth will set you free

  • By Rene B Milner on 04-01-16

Outstanding

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-07-18

Read his previous book, Overdiagnosed. This is a great follow up. As a biomedical researcher, Dr. Welch has changed the way I think about medical technology and the benefits of incremental “enhancement”.

  • Why Economies Rise or Fall

  • By: Peter Rodriguez, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Peter Rodriguez
  • Length: 12 hrs and 11 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 172
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 153
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 153

How can a nation create the conditions for economic growth and prosperity? And what, once these conditions are achieved, can it do to sustain this progress? Discover the answers (which may surprise you) in these 24 lectures that guide you through a stimulating and, above all, accessible examination of what economists know and don't know about the elusive search for economic prosperity.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic course.

  • By B. duPont on 11-19-16

Outstanding

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-15-17

Loved the section on the failure of capitalism in Latin America, something few economics text cover. Very interesting from start to finish.

  • Above Suspicion

  • By: Joe Sharkey
  • Narrated by: Marc Cashman
  • Length: 13 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 571
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 536
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 531

A personal look at a crime of passion describes an FBI agent's successful career, family life, and extramarital affair that ended in murder, and the guilt that drove him to confess in spite of his impenetrable government shield. In a true story of crime, guilt, and conscience, a model agent's illicit involvement with an informant leads him to commit a crime that reveals all the workings of the human heart - and the dark side of the FBI.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent journalism

  • By 6catz on 02-01-17

Fascinating, sad story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-17-17

The author does a brilliant job revealing depth of all characters, even the "bad guy(s)." The entire story is almost always more nuanced than what we read in newspapers.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Secret Race

  • Inside the Hidden World of the Tour de France: Doping, Cover-ups, and Winning at All Costs
  • By: Tyler Hamilton, Daniel Coyle
  • Narrated by: Sean Runnette
  • Length: 11 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,168
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,032
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,035

Here is an explosive book that takes us, for the first time, deep inside a shadowy, fascinating, and surreal world of unscrupulous doctors, anything-goes team directors, and athletes so relentlessly driven to succeed that they would do anything—and take any risk, physical, mental, or moral—to gain the edge they needed to win. The Secret Race is a riveting, courageous act of witness from a man who is as determined to reveal the hard truth about his sport as he once was to win the Tour de France.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Gripping and fascinating

  • By Alan on 09-09-12

Not the same old story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-27-17

Insider's account of cycling and doping culture. This book finally swayed my opinion on Lance's legacy. "Everyone was doing it" and "level playing field" do not fit a complete understanding of facts. With apparent willingness to sabotage other riders behind the scenes, one wonders if Lance was even the most talented rider on his team (if it were a level playing field). . . Tyler is a tough dude, his own story is interesting irrespective of his more famous former teammate.

  • How America Lost Its Secrets

  • Edward Snowden, the Man and the Theft
  • By: Edward Jay Epstein
  • Narrated by: Michael Bybee
  • Length: 11 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 101
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 94
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 93

After details of American government surveillance were published in 2013, Edward Snowden, formerly a subcontracted IT analyst for the NSA, became the center of an international controversy: Was he a hero, traitor, whistle-blower, spy? Was his theft legitimized by the nature of the information he exposed? When is it necessary for governmental transparency to give way to subterfuge? Edward Jay Epstein brings a lifetime of journalistic and investigative acumen to bear on these and other questions.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A different way of looking at things

  • By Stephanie M. McKay on 05-12-17

Rewriting the narrative

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-20-17

I was conflicted about the Snowden story. I hold some libertarian values, although I have since come to believe libertarianism is rooted in idealistic naivety. . . A truly libertarian from of government is not practical given realities of human nature. Everyone is not an ethical humanist. Society benefits from protection of consequences, even unintended ones, of stupid and self-destructive decisions.

I challenge anyone that considers Snowden to be a patriotic hero to read this book, consider the facts, and explain why you still think he is an American patriot. There were other ways to accomplish his alleged mission without hand delivery intelligence to our political enemies. I am open minded, my mind can be changed, but it would take one hell of an argument to convince me is is not a narcissistic traitor. Much like Putin, he is a great liar. Convincing, sincere delivery. I completely understand how people find both Putin and Snowden credible and honest. Even when I KNOW Putin is lying, I find him believable. That might be the trait that Trump so admires about Putin--80% approval rating, in part, because he is a MUCH better liar than Trump. Trump is better than average liar, I think he is able to believe his own BS, but he is no Putin.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Brain Myths Exploded

  • Lessons from Neuroscience
  • By: The Great Courses, Indre Viskontas
  • Narrated by: Indre Viskontas
  • Length: 11 hrs and 55 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,655
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,478
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,465

Much of the layperson's knowledge of the brain is predicated on a lack of understanding about this mysterious organ. To start building a more straightforward, accurate understanding of current breakthroughs in neuroscience, you have to start by shattering popular brain myths.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great lecturer, very enjoyable

  • By Jared T Wilsey on 02-14-17

Great lecturer, very enjoyable

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-14-17

Having read and studied a lot in this area, I did not expect to learn many new fact, or busting of old myths, but in fact I did. And the things I already knew were explained in such an interesting way that I still enjoyed and benefited, will help me to explain things in future. No vocal fry, great speaking voice as well.

110 of 115 people found this review helpful