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Edward

USA
  • 8
  • reviews
  • 206
  • helpful votes
  • 24
  • ratings
  • The Colors of Space

  • By: Marion Zimmer Bradley
  • Narrated by: Jim Roberts
  • Length: 4 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 51
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 30
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 31

In The Colors of Space, young Bart Steele, Space Academy graduate, is waiting in a spaceport for a ship to take him home when something happens that suddenly thrusts him into the center of a quest for the secret of interstellar travel. The method of faster than light travel, called "warp drive" in later Sci-Fi stories, is a tightly kept secret of alien race known as the "Lhari."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Good stuff

  • By Edward on 01-23-10

Good stuff

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-23-10

I am a great fan of Marion Zimmer Bradley, having read The Mists of Avalon and the entire Darkover series.
Like those, this story is well written, fast paced and has a lot of food for thought. In some ways it
reminds me of the movie, Avatar. In both, the hero learns that just because aliens are different, it does
not maker them inferior, bad, or the enemy. In both stories there are good and bad aliens and good and bad men.
A word about the reader... I think he did a fine job. However, as a former reader for the blind, I know
that recording books is a pain-staking and time consuming job and that it is really easy to make a mistake
without knowing it. There are a couple of small goofs in this book but I don't blame the reader.
It's the job of the "checker" or, I would guess, the "sound editor" in the professional world to catch such mistakes.
That person missed a couple in this case... So five stars to the book, five to the reader and three to the checker.
I see that The Door Through Space is also available. Looking forward to that next.

29 of 29 people found this review helpful

  • Dubliners

  • By: James Joyce
  • Narrated by: Jim Killavey
  • Length: 6 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 43
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 31
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 30

This collection of 15 stories was first published in 1914. James wrote them as descriptions of middle class life in Ireland but in each story one or more characters has an "epiphany," - a moment where the character has a speical moment of illumination. Many of the characters in these stories later appear in his novel, Ulysses.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful

  • By Edward on 07-21-09

Wonderful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-21-09

Wonderful stories. Narrator "lapses" into American pronunciations once in a while but overall reading is very good.

14 of 15 people found this review helpful

  • The Machine Stops

  • By: E. M. Forster
  • Narrated by: Jim Roberts
  • Length: 1 hr and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 87
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 68
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 68

This story describes a world of the future in which humans all remain in their cubicles while all their needs are met by a supercomputer called, "The Machine". They communicate with each other and attend "online" classes and meetings through the Machine and people seldom meet face to face. A problem arises when one man, Kuno, decides he is not satisfied with staying in his room and decides to explore outside.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great Story

  • By Edward on 07-21-09

Great Story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-21-09

Great Story. Well Read. Who would have thought that E.M. Forster could right something like this?
Unfortunately, this seems to be his only Sci-Fi story.

21 of 24 people found this review helpful

  • How to Live on 24 Hours a Day

  • By: Arnold Bennett
  • Narrated by: Jim Roberts
  • Length: 1 hr and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 140
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 107
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 108

Arnold Bennett was an English novelist and author. Among his most popular novels are The Grand Babylon Hotel and Anna of the Five Towns. However, none of his novels approached the popularity of his little book, "How to Live on Twenty-Four Hours a Day." It caused a sensation when first printed and continues to be printed and widely read today. In it, he offers practical advice on how one might live (as opposed to just existing ) within the confines of 24 hours a day.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A bit dated but still.....

  • By Edward on 05-30-09

A bit dated but still.....

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-30-09

Many of the examples in this book are dated but the ideas and overall theme are excellent. This could be a life changing book.

21 of 21 people found this review helpful

  • The Science of Getting Rich

  • By: Wallace D. Wattles
  • Narrated by: Jim Roberts
  • Length: 2 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,538
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,099
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,081

Wallace D. Wattles was an American "New Thought" writer who wrote this amazing little book in 1910. It caused a sensation then, and continues to be popular today. In fact, Rhonda Byrne said that part of her inspriation for her best-selling book and film The Secret came from this book.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Believe and receive!

  • By Djackhar on 01-07-15

good with a few grains

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-30-09

This has some really excellent advice but the style takes getting used to. Some will probably love it and some may hate it. As I said, it took some getting used to but I'm glad I did. Much food for thought.

54 of 59 people found this review helpful

  • The Art of War

  • By: Sun Tzu
  • Narrated by: Jim Roberts
  • Length: 1 hr and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 391
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 210
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 206

This is the complete text of The Art of War, one of the oldest and most successful books on military strategy in the world. It has also been applied to business and managerial strategies. The translation, by Lionel Giles, is considered one of the best available. This unabridged edition of The Art of War includes only the most essential translator's notes so that the words and thoughts of Sun Tzu may be easily understood.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Good Version

  • By Sandinic on 06-14-09

Relevant as ever

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-30-09

Amazing that a book written so many years ago go could still give so much practical advice for today - not just for war but for business. Very short listen with much good advice.

30 of 30 people found this review helpful

  • The Day Time Stopped Moving

  • By: Bradner Buckner
  • Narrated by: Jim Roberts
  • Length: 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3

All Dave Miller wanted to do was commit suicide in peace. He tried, but the things that happened after he'd pulled the trigger were all wrong. Like everyone standing around like statues. No St. Peter, no pearly gate, no pitchforks or halos. He might just as well have saved the bullet!

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Good story

  • By Edward on 05-30-09

Good story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-30-09

Good "twilight zone" sort of story. In fact I think an episode of that series may have been based on this. Reading was good, too.

10 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

  • By: F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Narrated by: Kevin Killavey
  • Length: 1 hr and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 126
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 59
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 59

F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote many wonderful romantic and realistic short stories and a few incredible "on the edge" fantasy and supernatural stories. Although the story of "Benjamin Button" is quite different than the 2009 movie, the premise is the same - a man is born old and lives his life backwards! Fizgerald says he got the idea from Mark Twain's remark that it was a pity that the best part of life came at the beginning and the worst part at the end.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great story

  • By Edward on 04-01-09

Well done

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-20-09

Well done reading of this story. Concept takes a lot of "suspension of disbelief" but it's certainly an imaginative story.

27 of 28 people found this review helpful