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Teresa

PLAISTOW, NH, United States
  • 6
  • reviews
  • 10
  • helpful votes
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  • Pachinko

  • By: Min Jin Lee
  • Narrated by: Allison Hiroto
  • Length: 18 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,299
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,707
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5,695

Profoundly moving and gracefully told, Pachinko follows one Korean family through the generations, beginning in early 1900s Korea with Sunja, the prized daughter of a poor yet proud family, whose unplanned pregnancy threatens to shame them. Betrayed by her wealthy lover, Sunja finds unexpected salvation when a young tubercular minister offers to marry her and bring her to Japan to start a new life.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Horrible narrator

  • By Mother of Two on 11-08-18

Narrator is reason for return

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-16-18

To be honest, I have not finished this novel yet. I'm really glad to have the kindle version because try as I did, the narrator of this book was not an appropriate choice. Her tone, inflections and expressions of emotions are juvenile and I felt like she was doing that thing I used to do when reading while nursing my babies, reading to them like I was reading one of their books. They were babies and had no idea what I was reading, but I got my reading in while reading to them. Win-win. I would not read to adults in the same way. And another little thing, that I probably can't explain well, she does that thing that younger people do now where they kind of, but not really, slur over words, or slur them together a little bit and that just bugs me.

Other than that, this book tells a great story. It took me a bit to get used to the writing, which I also think could have used editing. The author tells a lot without actually showing and making it a true part of the story, and her writing style felt choppy, the dialogue stilted. Still. I will finish it as I am really drawn into the lives of these family members.

  • The Grave's a Fine and Private Place

  • A Flavia de Luce Novel
  • By: Alan Bradley
  • Narrated by: Jayne Entwistle
  • Length: 9 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 959
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 894
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 882

In the wake of an unthinkable family tragedy, 12-year-old Flavia de Luce is struggling to fill her empty days. For a needed escape, Dogger, the loyal family servant, suggests a boating trip for Flavia and her two older sisters. Something grazes her fingers as she dangles them in the water. She clamps down on the object, imagining herself Ernest Hemingway battling a marlin, and pulls up what she expects will be a giant fish. But in Flavia's grip is something far better: a human head, attached to a human body.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Flavia is in the thick of it

  • By Mothermersnerd on 02-05-18

Nice installment for this series

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

First, the narrator for this series will be forever in my head, connected to the character.

This book was a nice improvement over some of the previous. Flavia is back with her family and being watched over and helped to grow and learn by Dodger and learning that while it isn't always obvious to her she is loved by her sisters and has more in common with them than she thinks. The mystery is okay, the relationships built even better and some of Flavia's humor and naivety are diminishing as she grows. Her sense of humor is there, but circumstances and growing have made her a bit more serious. I thought this might be the last in the series, it did sort of end in a way that could be left off, but there is at least one more book coming. I will be sad when Alan Bradley says goodbye to his writing of Flavia.

  • The Trouble with Goats and Sheep

  • A Novel
  • By: Joanna Cannon
  • Narrated by: Paula Wilcox
  • Length: 11 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 356
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 331
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 328

England, 1976. Mrs. Creasy is missing, and the Avenue is alive with whispers. The neighbors blame her sudden disappearance on the heat wave, but 10-year-olds Grace and Tilly aren't convinced. As the summer shimmers endlessly on, the girls decide to take matters into their own hands. Inspired by the local vicar, they go looking for God - they believe that if they find him they might also find Mrs. Creasy and bring her home.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • WARNING: Fantastic book but missing key section of last chapter

  • By HL on 07-21-18

Charming and Quirky

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

The narrator is quite good for this book.

I really liked this book a lot. Joanna Cannon is adept at showing you what you need to know through visuals and conversation. She respects her readers intelligence and lets them infer meaning in situations and understanding of her characters without coming right out and saying that so-and-so has this issue and so-and-so is more adept at this.... It is lovely to read a book like that. I love when things dawn on me by reading into and not being told.

This book is filled with quirky characters, misunderstandings, a mystery of sorts and two little girls who are naive and yet intelligent beyond their years in ways that most children probably are, but as adults we forget we were that way (I do remember it sometimes) and don't always see it in the children around us. Some of the narrative is from the point of view of one of the little girls, the rest is other characters, often of the same incident. The contrasting telling is not really so obvious always, it occurs to you as you read. It unfolds so well. I just really loved it and will definitely read more by this author.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Splendour Falls

  • By: Susanna Kearsley
  • Narrated by: Barbara Rosenblat
  • Length: 12 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 784
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 725
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 727

Emily Braden has stopped believing in fairy tales and happy endings. When her fascinating but unreliable cousin Harry invites her on a holiday to explore the legendary town of Chinon, and promptly disappears - well, that's Harry for you. As Emily makes the acquaintance of Chinon and its people, she begins to uncover dark secrets beneath the charm.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • adventure, mystery an a touch of the supernatural

  • By Donna A on 05-13-14

I love Barbara Rosenblatt, but.....

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-27-14

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

Yes, it kind of took me back to my early teens when I read gothic romance/mystery novels by Mary Stewart and Phyllis Whitney.

What three words best describe Barbara Rosenblat’s voice?

Here is the problem. I love Barbara Rosenblatt, I often have chosen books because she was the narrator, and she did a decent job reading the book which is why I gave 3 stars and not 2. The 2 stars, or one, would go to the producer or whoever thought she was the voice of Emily. She was not. Unfortunately she was just a terrible choice. She didn't sound like a 28 year old girl at all.

Was The Splendour Falls worth the listening time?

Yes, but I was glad that I had this book along with the kindle/whispersync book so that I could read much of it. I did listen to some while driving or exercising, but would have preferred another narrator.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Maisie Dobbs

  • By: Jacqueline Winspear
  • Narrated by: Rita Barrington
  • Length: 10 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5,676
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,777
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4,769

Maisie Dobbs isn't just any young housemaid. Through her own natural intelligence - and the patronage of her benevolent employers - she works her way into college at Cambridge. After the War I and her service as a nurse, Maisie hangs out her shingle back at home: M. DOBBS, TRADE AND PERSONAL INVESTIGATIONS. But her very first assignment soon reveals a much deeper, darker web of secrets, which will force Maisie to revisit the horrors of the Great War and the love she left behind.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A delightful discovery

  • By Lori on 08-07-09

Narrator was terrible.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-27-14

What did you like best about Maisie Dobbs? What did you like least?

Best: I'm not sure I liked anything 'best', but I can see how it makes a good set up for the series.Least: The narrator

What did you like best about this story?

There was some good history and a twist to the end that shed some light on the character of Maisie Dobbs.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

A good narrator is nearly invisible in his or her reading and the listener forgets that they are being told a story, the narrator makes them a part of it. My experience with this novel was the opposite. I was painfully aware of the narrator in this reading. Thankfully this is the only book in the series that she has read. I'm glad I was using Whispersync for this book, as I got to read more than listen.

Any additional comments?

First, have you noticed when a new television series begins that during the first episode or two, maybe, the writers attempt to introduce the characters in such a way that you feel you know them intimately by the second episode? In doing so they throw everything at you and it is overacted in a way that seems like charicature. Good writers are better at this than most and there are a few series that I have heard are very good, but I won't know because I gave up after the first episode. This book was a bit like that for me with both the characters and the philosophy. A little too much of the 'new age' chit-chat and reasoning, and maybe it is because I am immersed in that every day and meditation, empathy, mirroring, intuition and Buddhist philosophy of the self are things that I don't need spelled out for me, but might have been left for me to inuit, sort of bugged me a little. It seemed to me that the author was newish to this and wanted to throw everything she knew about mindfulness into a novel. I also felt that the characters were not left to be as complex as they could be because so much of who they are was spelled out for me. Having said that, I'm hoping that with all the introductions out of the way the series will go on and be more about mysteries and that in already knowing the characters there will be a familiarity that will leave Ms. Winspear to write the story and less the characters. That is what I love about series like Her Royal Spyness, Flavia de Luce, Amelia Peabody and others. We know what the character is thinking in only a few words of dialogue and can nod knowingly or chuckle in understanding.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A Leaf on the Wind of All Hallows

  • An Outlander Novella
  • By: Diana Gabaldon
  • Narrated by: Robert Ian MacKenzie
  • Length: 1 hr and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,801
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,530
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,520

Available for the first time as an audiobook in this original Outlander novella, Diana Gabaldon reveals what really happened to Roger MacKenzie Wakefield’s parents. Orphaned during World War II, Roger believed that his mother died during the London Blitz, and that his father, an RAF pilot, was killed in combat. But in An Echo in the Bone, Roger discovers that this may not be the whole story. Now, in "A Leaf on the Wind of All Hallows," readers finally learn the truth.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Family Reunions In Print

  • By Gypsy on 01-27-14

Not sure if it was the book or me

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-12-12

If you could sum up A Leaf on the Wind of All Hallows in three words, what would they be?

I only listened to part of this book and then I read the rest on my Kindle. While I think the story was fine for an Outlander novella and enjoyed it, the audio quality wasn't that great. I downloaded the book to the app on my phone and it had its issues, there were inconsistencies in the volume, it kept fading in and out. So I finished it on my kindle app and either that was formatted incorrectly or there were some mistakes in the text, whether in the writing or the transcribing, I don't remember them as being characteristic of Gabaldon's writing, but I usually listen and may have missed them.I did enjoy the narrator and overall it was a quick and enjoyable read.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful