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  • The Lost Country

  • By: William Gay
  • Narrated by: T. Ryder Smith
  • Length: 15 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 14

 

The Lost Country centers on Edgewater, who's recently been discharged from the navy, and a one-armed con man named Roosterfish who takes him under his wing as they both search desperately for a forgotten past and a future that may never come. The Lost Country cements Gay as one of the strongest voices in Southern literature, alongside Cormac McCarthy, Flannery O'Connor, and William Faulkner.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • If you like poetic and gritty Southern Gothic-

  • By J's mom on 07-20-18

If you like poetic and gritty Southern Gothic-

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-20-18

William Gay's grim menagerie of the Southern Gothic, finished shortly before his death, has finally been pieced together from manuscripts, and it's wonderful. He has channeled the desperation of Carson McCullers, the characterization of Flannery O'Connor, and the language of Cormac McCarthy and William Faulkner. That may seem like hyperbole, but it's not. He was that good. Even fans of European Weird fiction could appreciate this 'purple' writing. The only reason this book doesn't rate higher is perhaps due to the posthumous editing, as it gets unfocused in its episodic nature, and some of its overuse of simile needed to be reined in. The man was a master of creating metaphor, but there needed to be restraint on a few occasions. Finally, I had felt in previous novels that Gay was trying too hard to imitate McCarthy and Faulkner, but this novel shows that Gay, in the twilight of his career, could distinctly equal them.
-T. Ryder Smith did a phenomenal job performing this book, and he took great care in breathing personalities and idiosyncrasies into every (forlorn) character.