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Roo

Whitestone, NY United States
  • 4
  • reviews
  • 1
  • helpful vote
  • 5
  • ratings
  • A Distant Mirror

  • The Calamitous Fourteenth Century
  • By: Barbara W. Tuchman
  • Narrated by: Nadia May
  • Length: 28 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,452
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 941
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 959

The fourteenth century reflects two contradictory images: on the one hand, a glittering time of crusades and castles, cathedrals and chivalry, and the exquisitely decorated Books of Hours; and on the other, a time of ferocity and spiritual agony, a world of chaos and the plague.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Gripping, once you get into it

  • By E. Smakman on 11-30-09

Catastrophically good!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-16-18

I read this book 5 years ago and I just had to listen to its wonderful storytelling. Of a dark and terrible time; just when u think it can’t get worse...it does!!!
The Sham of Chivalry is exposed the problems caused by greedy elites. It’s a distant mirror indeed. They all act like Donald Trump would and boast like Donald trump does.

  • The System

  • The Glory and Scandal of Big-Time College Football
  • By: Jeff Benedict, Armen Keteyian
  • Narrated by: Mark Deakins
  • Length: 17 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 348
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 312
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 312

College football has never been more popular - or more chaotic. Millions fill 100,000-seat stadiums every Saturday; tens of millions more watch on television every weekend. The 2013 Discover BCS National Championship game between Notre Dame and Alabama had a viewership of 26.4 million people, second only to the Super Bowl. Billions of dollars from television deals now flow into the game; the average budget for a top-ten team is $80 million; top coaches make more than $3 million a year; the highest paid, more than $5 million.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Gripping Inside Look at an Industry to Itself

  • By W Perry Hall on 01-23-14

The whole story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-14-17

An even account of the glory: what makes FBS CFB great and compelling....and the scandal that makes it and the book juicy. You should love college ball to enjoy this book.

  • War of Attrition

  • Fighting the First World War
  • By: William Philpott
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 17 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 79
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 73
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 72

The Great War of 1914-1918 was the first mass conflict to fully mobilize the resources of industrial powers against one another, resulting in a brutal, bloody, protracted war of attrition between the world's great economies. Now, 100 years after the first guns of August rang out on the Western front, historian William Philpott reexamines the causes and lingering effects of the first truly modern war.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Confusing and disorganized

  • By BMC on 08-05-14

Decent WW1 book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-14-15

While not a gripping account of the war, it's an excellent explanation for the character of the war.
Attrition. Body count. Material production. Courage on the battlefield is not a factor, morale is. The war is a meat grinder, and the generals who realized how to fight and win an attritional war, are the heroes.
The leaders thinking in outmoded terms of valour and élan...are the ones responsible for the worst decisions.
Offensives only work with a vast expenditure of material, mostly artillery shells, for limited objectives. The losses of 1916 are presented as achieving a great deal; they led to German attrition on a large scale.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • I Wear the Black Hat

  • Grappling with Villains (Real and Imagined)
  • By: Chuck Klosterman
  • Narrated by: Chuck Klosterman
  • Length: 7 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 706
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 628
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 622

In I Wear the Black Hat, Klosterman questions the very nature of how modern people understand the concept of villainy. What was so Machiavellian about Machiavelli? Why don't we see Batman the same way we see Bernhard Goetz? Who's more worthy of our vitriol - Bill Clinton or Don Henley? What was O.J. Simpson's second-worst decision? Masterfully blending cultural analysis with self-interrogation and limitless imagination, I Wear the Black Hat delivers perceptive observations on the complexity of the anti-hero.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • My Favorite Writer Falls a Little Short...

  • By Niels J. Rasmussen on 08-20-13

Still great

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-06-15

Funny and thoughtful, his writing feels like interesting conversations for intellectuals. What makes evil and why don't we remember bad things about our heros? Muhammad Ali turned Joe Frazier into a hated Uncle Tom , not a real black man, the tool of racists who is stupid and ugly. Ali went nasty and personal for no reason. Frazier had been his friend , had helped Ali in his time of need. Had loaned him money. Frazier came from a much more difficult environment; and lived among the disadvantaged, had more of a claim of 'keeping it real'. Why ruin Fraziers life and make him as hated as the Klan among Fraziers own community? Why doesn't anybody care today?