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Yixiao

  • 7
  • reviews
  • 41
  • helpful votes
  • 9
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  • The Explanation by Blessed Theophylact of the Holy Gospel According to St. Matthew

  • By: C. Stade
  • Narrated by: Nathan Williams
  • Length: 9 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 50
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 44
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 45

This classic Eastern Orthodox commentary on the Gospel of Matthew was written in about the year 1100 A.D. by Theophylact of Bulgaria, a brilliant and saintly Byzantine churchman. Blessed Theophylact distills the teaching of the early Church Fathers, especially St. John Chrysostom, in language that is profound, powerful, and direct. His commentary has remained a primary text on New Testament interpretation throughout the Christian East. Translated from the original Greek text.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant, except...

  • By Myrtle on 03-08-15

There you have it, a thousand years new

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-15-17

Concise and terse sentences, absolute authority and persuasiveness. It says so much with so little- a stark contrast to mainline protestant commentaries which say so little with so unnecessarily much.
I resisted this recording for a long time-indeed what could it have to offer being written so long ago while there are an abundance of Gospel commentaries available? Well, apparently almost every single theological question I formulated during bible study classes and sunday liturgies are answered here. To say something is as relevant today as it was a thousand years ago is a cliche, but in this case it is true. The narrator does an excellent job with his calm seemingly monotonous reading, a book like this has a kind of sanctity that any kind of emotional reading would ruin.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • When Awareness Becomes Natural

  • A Guide to Cultivating Mindfulness in Everyday Life
  • By: Sayadaw U Tejaniya
  • Narrated by: Brian Nishii
  • Length: 6 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 94
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 91
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 90

Finding awareness in any kind of ordinary daily activity... The first trade book from a Southeast Asian Buddhist monk-teacher who is becoming prominent worldwide, particularly in the insight meditation community. Meditation is great - but it's not what Buddhist practice is all about. That's the message of this engaging and funny Burmese Buddhist monk, and it's a message that is finding a significant following among Westerners in the insight meditation tradition.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Gem

  • By Yixiao on 12-05-17

A Gem

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-05-17

For years and years I have repeated come to the same conclusion on my own: it's not necessary to confine oneself to a particular place and time to practice meditation. If a person is unable to maintain awareness from moment to moment then all seated practice is in vain. Satipatthana sutta somehow confirms my view. Yet how difficult it is to do this? To use too much energy I exhaust myself completely in less than a week and to do it too casually I slip away from mindfulness in a few minutes. This book essentially offered me all tips and advices to avoid these two pitfalls.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • 48 Laws of Power

  • By: Robert Greene
  • Narrated by: Richard Poe
  • Length: 23 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,619
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,394
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,341

Amoral, cunning, ruthless, and instructive, this piercing work distills 3,000 years of the history of power into 48 well-explicated laws. This bold volume outlines the laws of power in their unvarnished essence, synthesizing the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun Tzu, Carl von Clausewitz, and other infamous strategists. The 48 Laws of Power will fascinate any listener interested in gaining, observing, or defending against ultimate control.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • You don't have to be a psychopath to like this.

  • By Gaggleframpf on 02-25-16

mental economy

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-05-17

Unlike many others who dislike the book I don't find the content immoral. It does spell out human nature accurately. However many of the stories are related and interpreted in a retrospective and highly arbitrary way. Did the manipulators and the executors of these tricks and strategies intentionally behave the way they did? Some sure did vast majority probabely did not. Their actions turned out well because of good fortune and retrospective reinterpretation. To deliberate apply these tricks would promise only disaster. Also it is ridiculous for anyone to assimilate these 48 laws- how much conscious effort must you possess? I believe mindfulness of your surroundings and a cultivated sensitivity (ability to read the air) are all you need to achieve success, effortlessly, without you even being aware of it, and often in a much more moral way without hurting as many people. For these reasonsThis is perhaps one of the most worthless books I have ever read because the idea of learning "social tricks" promises functionality but is misleading in practice. We Chinese have a saying, there are countless tricks/techniques to conquer the world, the highest one being a sincere and kind heart. It's too damn easy to be calculating and mean, it's next to impossible to remain sincere and kind. I guess that's where the real magic is.

23 of 32 people found this review helpful

  • The Ancient Faith Psalter

  • By: Monks of the Orthodox Church
  • Narrated by: Fr. John Oliver
  • Length: 8 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 75
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 65
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 62

A dedicated group of Orthodox monks (who wish to remain anonymous) have created a fresh English translation of the Masoretic Hebrew text of the Psalter, corrected to the Septuagint. A frequently asked question: The Psalms aren't in numerical order in this Psalter. Why is that? Answer: That was done intentionally. This edition of the Psalter was created for prayer, at home or in church, rather than for reference. It's not just another Book of Psalms.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • huge blessing

  • By Joshua on 02-24-17

Psalter the way it's meant to be digested.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-27-17

Psalter's meant to be read out loud and heard, not printed and read. So thank you Monks of the Orthodox Church and Fr. John Oliver. I find much strength having now the access to listen to the psalter while commuting on an over crowded Tokyo train to work. An honest presentation of the psalter beats one thousand "upbeat, don't lose hope yet" type of protestant publications. Glory to God.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Laurus

  • By: Lisa C. Hayden - translator, Eugene Vodolazkin
  • Narrated by: James Anderson Foster
  • Length: 13 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 65
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 62
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 62

It is the late 15th century and a village healer in Russia called Laurus is powerless to help his beloved as she dies in childbirth, unwed and without having received communion. Devastated and desperate, he sets out on a journey in search of redemption. But this is no ordinary journey: it is one that spans ages and countries, and which brings him face-to-face with a host of unforgettable, eccentric characters and legendary creatures from the strangest medieval bestiaries.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Speechless

  • By Yixiao on 11-27-17

Speechless

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-27-17

buy a hard copy as well!
read, re-read, doesn't matter you are religious or not but definitely helps if you know a thing or two about Russian Orthodoxy much like Brothers Karamazov. When you know nothing about Russia's spiritual heritage, books like this are still AAA grade reading material. If you are sympathetic to Orthodox spirituality, then the reading experience would be stratospherically enhanced- an altogether tear inducing, core shaking experience.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Moral Animal

  • Why We Are the Way We Are: The New Science of Evolutionary Psychology
  • By: Robert Wright
  • Narrated by: Greg Thornton
  • Length: 16 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,334
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,102
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,105

Are men literally born to cheat? Does monogamy actually serve women's interests? These are among the questions that have made The Moral Animal one of the most provocative science books in recent years. Wright unveils the genetic strategies behind everything from our sexual preferences to our office politics - as well as their implications for our moral codes and public policies.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Ridiculously Insightful

  • By Liron on 10-25-10

Remember its one of the first of its genre!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-27-17

The book is excellently written posing some of the most interesting and stimulating questions and ideas in evolutionary psychology. I personally find evolutionary psychology a crippled discipline that seeks self-confirmation over asking open ended questions. Having said so I still find Wright writes with a positivity and does not degrade men to mere animals (unlike the title may suggest) like many other writers of the same subject. Also while it is awesome to realise that such information was compiled and presented back in 1994, it is sad to see absolutely nothing worthwhile, nothing groundbreaking aimed at the general public has been published since then, despite the huge advancement in technology and data compilation.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Language Instinct

  • How the Mind Creates Language
  • By: Steven Pinker
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey
  • Length: 18 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 748
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 626
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 616

In this classic, the world’s expert on language and mind lucidly explains everything you always wanted to know about language: how it works, how children learn it, how it changes, how the brain computes it, and how it evolved. With deft use of examples of humor and wordplay, Steven Pinker weaves our vast knowledge of language into a compelling story: language is a human instinct, wired into our brains by evolution. The Language Instinct received the William James Book Prize from the American Psychological Association....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Absolutely Amazing and Interesting

  • By J. C. on 10-28-12

A very dry, technical work

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-27-17

The book is an expansion on Chomsky's universal language theory. nothing new, which is alright. The issue is precisely what the author tried to avoid in his own introduction as not to write a book for the academics but for every day people. The book managed to do that in the first 1/4 and collapsed into pure scientific rambling. I could not finish the book. however I would give another Pinker book a try just based on the excellent albeit not so well written content.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful