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Richard

  • 26
  • reviews
  • 11
  • helpful votes
  • 60
  • ratings
  • Sometimes I Lie

  • By: Alice Feeney
  • Narrated by: Stephanie Racine
  • Length: 9 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 6,551
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,030
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 6,023

Amber wakes up in a hospital. She can't move. She can't speak. She can't open her eyes. She can hear everyone around her, but they have no idea. Amber doesn't remember what happened, but she has a suspicion her husband had something to do with it. Alternating between her paralyzed present, the week before her accident, and a series of childhood diaries from 20 years ago, this brilliant psychological thriller asks: Is something really a lie if you believe it's the truth?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great book. Highly recommended.

  • By Amazon Customer on 03-17-18

A good story with flawed characters

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-12-18

I really enjoyed this book but I don't think the ending was that unpredictable. The character development was excellent. Moving through different times helped to define characters and how they became who they were as adults. These are flawed characters, all of them, and not always very likeable. The book shows how our environment can sometimes impact us, and how sometimes we just have mental illness in us.

I recommend this book. It is suspenseful, and a great listen. The narration is good. I felt the book was believable. The characters were intelligent and used their intelligence in a very twisted fashion. The reader/listener needs to follow details as most all side stories are inter-related to something that will come up later in the story.

  • Silent Lies

  • By: Kathryn Croft
  • Narrated by: Antonia Beamish, Rosie Jones
  • Length: 9 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,713
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,530
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,525

Mia Hamilton lived the perfect life with her husband, university teacher Zach, and their two-year-old daughter. But everything changed when Zach committed suicide on the same night one of his students vanished. Five years later, just when Mia is beginning to heal, stranger Alison walks into her life, saying her husband didn't kill himself. Fragile, slight Alison leads Mia on a path into Zach's past, and Mia begins to think she never really knew her own husband.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Didn’t See it Coming!

  • By Debra on 02-19-18

Unexpected ending

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-02-18

Did not expect the result at the end until about the last half hour of listening. The end was tied up too quickly and not even really tied up. I suppose it left room for a sequel. I liked the book as it was hard to really figure out who did it. Definitely kept me listening. Great narrator.

  • Beneath a Scarlet Sky

  • A Novel
  • By: Mark Sullivan
  • Narrated by: Will Damron
  • Length: 17 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,147
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,806
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,728

Pino Lella wants nothing to do with the war or the Nazis. He's a normal Italian teenager - obsessed with music, food, and girls - but his days of innocence are numbered. When his family home in Milan is destroyed by Allied bombs, Pino joins an underground railroad helping Jews escape over the Alps, and falls for Anna, a beautiful widow six years his senior. In an attempt to protect him, Pino's parents force him to enlist as a German soldier - a move they think will keep him out of combat.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Best Thing? It Really Happened!

  • By Charles Atkinson on 08-07-17

Different perspective on the impact of WW2

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-26-17

Following the main character in this story from hanging in the streets in Italy to helping Jews cross the border through the alps and then as a driver for one of Hitler's elite was fascinating. The performance was excellent and I loved the story.

  • Missoula

  • Rape and the Justice System in a College Town
  • By: Jon Krakauer
  • Narrated by: Mozhan Marno, Scott Brick
  • Length: 11 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,662
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,267
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,251

From best-selling author Jon Krakauer, a stark, powerful, meticulously reported narrative about a series of sexual assaults at the University of Montana - stories that illuminate the human drama behind the national plague of campus rape.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Without Consent

  • By Cynthia on 05-02-15

How our system responds to rape

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-13-15

As a Title IX Coordinator at my University, and knowing of the DOJ investigation at UM, I was interested in reading this book. My quick takeaway of it is that while Jon Krakauer writes a very thorough and interesting (and graphic) book, it is clearly biased and I believe that bias hurts his ability to truly reach his audience. I think it could have been just as powerful if he had not been so obvious in his leaning. As "they" say: let the facts speak for themselves.

What Jon Krakuer has done in this book is to present a true reflection of the campus process for investigating and adjudicating these type of cases. I am so impressed by the conduct board that heard this case and their ability to stand firm to their written processes. Whether you agree with the final outcome or not, a responsible campus conduct process will not allow themselves to be persuaded by outside pressures and will always fall back to their written policies and procedures.

This book also does a wonderful job in portraying how the legal system certainly doesn't have the answers in how to process cases of sexual assault. It is not uncommon to see victims of sexual assault turned away by the police or prosecutors for further investigation of their cases, because it is not a slam dunk. I continue to have survivors tell me that they were told they don't have a case because they were drunk, or they chose to go with the assailant. Seeking a way to regain control of their lives, the survivor sometimes depends on the University to provide a remedy through their conduct process.

With the advent of the "Dear Colleague Letter" on April 4, 2011, and continued regulations from the DOJ, VAWA, and DOE, the public would be shocked to know how many cases of sexual misconduct a University campus is now investigating each year. They would be surprised to know of the confusion college campuses are working under as federal guidelines and regulations are in conflict with one another.

These victims/survivors ARE sexually assaulted. Our court systems are not designed to provide an avenue for these difficult cases to be resolved. Yet, our Universities and Colleges in the U.S. are being assaulted by politicians who think the legal court systems can better handle these cases that Universities can. I wonder if the multitude of survivors/victims who are out there that have had their case turned away by the police, or state's attorney, or who have been re-victimized in a court hearing, would agree? College and University judicial processes provide for an avenue for the cases to be heard and for the assailant to be held accountable while the victim/survivor is heard and able to move towards some healing. It is certainly not a perfect process, but I would argue our court systems are even more broken when it comes to managing this very difficult cases.

I am thrilled that Jon Krakuer has tried to tackle this issue and begin to educate the general public. However, I am saddened that it is so obvious that he leans toward the support of the victim. After having investigated more claims of sexual assault on different college campuses than I care to think about, from information presented I would certainly come to the conclusion that the accused males portrayed in this book, are responsible for sexual assault. However, as another reviewer pointed on, Mr. Krakuer's story presents the incident from one primary point of view (the victim/survivor). The book would have been a much richer piece had we heard from the point of view of the accused as well.

Having said all that, I think this is a necessary read for all individuals heading off to college, but particularly for our lawmakers. As this book clearly illustrates, the traumatic impact of sexual assault on the victim/survivor and on the accused, cannot be minimized. Yet our lawmakers are sending confusing directives to our institutions of higher education that are in opposition to other directives. The losers are our students. Our justice system does no better in protecting and responding to these cases. In fact, I think our justice system is much worse. But that is another story, and perhaps another book for Mr. Krakuer.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Drums of Autumn

  • By: Diana Gabaldon
  • Narrated by: Davina Porter
  • Length: 44 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 28,758
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 24,282
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 24,181

Twice Claire has used an ancient stone circle to travel back to the 18th century. The first time she found love with a Scottish warrior but had to return to the 1940s to save their unborn child. The second time, 20 years later, she reunited with her lost love but had to leave behind the daughter that he would never see. Now Brianna, from her 1960s vantage point, has found a disturbing obituary and will risk everything in an attempt to change history.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I Can't Get Enough!

  • By Eugenia on 02-15-10

introducing a new generation

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-22-13

These books are LONG, but I love that as I have a long commute. The stories wrap you in, and Davina Porter is an excellent narrator. I have learned a great deal of history while following an intriquing story. In this one, the listener will get to know Briana and Roger to a greater depth. I feel like the story of Jamie falls into the background and at times, the story can get a bit longwinded. However, I felt this book was almost setting the stage for the upcoming books. It keeps my attention to the point that I am carrying my phone in my pocket as I do housework with the story on full blast so I can hear it. Thank you for the entertainment! I will be sorry when I finally finish the series.

  • Heaven and Hell

  • Volume Three of the North and South Trilogy
  • By: John Jakes
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 28 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,074
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 965
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 967

From America's master storyteller and writer of historical fiction comes the dramatic conclusion to the North and South saga. The Civil War has ended, but the Hazards and Mains have yet to face their greatest struggles. Even as the embers of old hatreds continue to burn in the heart of a nation torn apart by war, a new future in the West awaits a new generation of Americans seeking a life of their own - and a place to call their own.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Not as great as the first two

  • By Richard on 04-10-13

Not as great as the first two

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-10-13

I went through this whole series, one after another. The third book, while good, was not anywhere near as interesting as the first two. The description of the fight with the Indians with Custer was so vivid, it almost made you sick. I really like the depth of Charles Main's character. On the other end, I felt that few other characters were as developed in this book, as in the others. At times, it felt more like a mish mash of historical facts. Aston was fascinating to watch sink as a result of her own choices. Bent proved to be an interesting character weaving through the books.

All and all, I am glad I read the last book as I would have always wanted to know what happened with each of the characters. But the fact that this book was not to the level of the quality of story telling as the first two was clear. Still an enjoyable read and a must if you have done the first two books.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Gone with the Wind

  • By: Margaret Mitchell
  • Narrated by: Linda Stephens
  • Length: 49 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,257
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 7,687
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 7,711

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Literature, Margaret Mitchell's great novel of the South is one of the most popular books ever written. Within six months of its publication in 1936, Gone With the Wind had sold a million copies. To date, it has been translated into 25 languages, and more than 28 million copies have been sold. Here are the characters that have become symbols of passion and desire....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • not to miss audible experience

  • By dallas on 12-08-09

Like the Movie, LOVE the book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-27-12

It is hard to find someone who has not seen the movie, but you don't know Gone with the Wind, until you read the book. There were points where I could see the actors from the movie, and it worked line by line. But more often, I got the story behind the story, more on the thought processes of the characters, and as many have said, so much more on the history of the Civil War, particularly from the southern perspective. What I love is that none of the characters are painted with broad brush strokes as being good or bad; they are all so multi-faceted. Scarlett is a woman way ahead of her time, and could write her own book nowadays on business! This is my favorite of ALL the books I have listened to, and I know I will be listening again. A classic for very good reason. If you have not 'read' this, you are really missing something.

  • Spin

  • By: Robert Charles Wilson
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 17 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,903
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,574
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,579

One night when he was 10, Tyler stood in his backyard and watched the stars go out. They flared into brilliance, then disappeared, replaced by an empty black barrier. He and his best friends, Jason and Diane Lawton, had seen what became known as the Big Blackout. It would shape their lives.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • thoughtful, Bradbury-esque SF

  • By Ryan on 09-20-10

lacking character development

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-28-12

I wanted to like this book, but none of the characters were ever really developed to a level that I could feel for them. I got the book because I really enjoy Scott Brick as a narrator and I have enjoyed some more futuristic novels. However, this one didn't hold my interest well. I found the characters cold and the author did not really make them into three dimensional characters. The best job done on that was with the alcoholic mother. Too bad; interesting theory and interesting possibilities.

  • City of Masks

  • A Cree Black Thriller
  • By: Daniel Hecht
  • Narrated by: Anna Fields
  • Length: 15 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 665
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 318
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 322

Daniel Hecht has created a plausible, heart-stopping ghost thriller. Relying on the science of parapsychology to spine-tingling effect, he brings to life a remarkably compelling character in Cree Black, as well as the ghosts she confronts.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Unusual thriller

  • By JoAnn on 03-18-04

twists in story but narrator is grating

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-26-12

First I have to say that I am not a big fan of ghost stories, but I thought I would try this one out. I'm not sure I will again. The story was interesting but just didn't impress me a great deal. We have a ghost chaser who I really did not find as very likeable. Characters are not well-developed. In fact, I felt the ghosts were more developed as characters than the living and in particular, Cree.

But my biggest complaint was Anna Fields as a narrator. She had a fine voice for Cree, the main character (a female), but her voice for the men drove me nuts. It was absolutely terrible and made me want to speed past this part. She does the typical female just lowering her voice to sound like a man, which just took away from the story and your ability to see the male characters as anything real, or feel anything about them. I will not get another book read by this narrator. I did give her two stars because she narrated for the female characters and in particular for the female characters from New Orleans well. She did an exceptional job of picking up the New Orleans twang.

  • A Chance in the World

  • An Orphan Boy, a Mysterious Past, and How He Found a Place Called Home
  • By: Steve Pemberton
  • Narrated by: Steve Pemberton
  • Length: 8 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 236
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 212
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 210

A Chance in the World is the unbelievably true story of a wounded and broken boy destined to become a man of resilience, determination, and vision. Through it all, Steve’s story teaches us that no matter how broken our past, no matter how great our misfortunes, we have it in us to create a new beginning and to build a place where love awaits.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting, moving story

  • By Sandra on 03-27-12

Survival and a man's search for himself

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-20-12

This book started out talking about the abuse a child survived through the foster care system, but I felt was really about a man finding his history and figuring out who he was. There is no arguing that what the author went through was horrific. I am impressed with his resiliency and ability to survive and flourish, based on his background. He can be very proud of that indeed. But at times I felt this book was choppy and that it was really written more as a personal renewal and search for the author. It felt voyeuristic at times. I really didn't like the author's voice as a narrator.

What I will say that I really liked about this book was that it helped me to better understand my foster son's need to find his history. With foster and adopted children, they need their families to honor their past, and help them seek it out. This book is wonderful in helping parents see that this is vital to a child feeling whole, and means nothing about their feelings about their relationship with them.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful