LISTENER

Stephen Gandee

Mississippi
  • 2
  • reviews
  • 0
  • helpful votes
  • 2
  • ratings
  • The Imperial Japanese Navy in the Pacific War

  • By: Mark E. Stille
  • Narrated by: Joe Barrett
  • Length: 11 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 32
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 30
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 30

The Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) was the third most powerful navy in the world at the start of World War II and came to dominate the Pacific in the early months of the war. This was a remarkable turnaround for a navy that only began to modernize in 1868. The Imperial Japanese Navy in the Pacific War details the Japanese ships which fought in the Pacific and examines the principles on which they were designed, how they were armed, when and where they were deployed, and how effective they were in battle.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great Technical Reference

  • By Dale H. Reeck on 06-09-18

Exactly what I wanted.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-02-19

To explain what the IJN really was some specifications of hardware must be mentioned. I don’t find it technical. Technical to me would be aspects like boiler types and ratings, fuel oil capacity, etc. I find it a good book to continue deeper research into the Pacific War.

  • Morning Star, Midnight Sun

  • The Early Guadalcanal-Solomons Campaign of World War II August–October 1942
  • By: Jeffrey R. Cox
  • Narrated by: Joe Barrett
  • Length: 20 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 111
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 103
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 100

Following the disastrous Java Sea campaign, the Allies went on the offensive in the Pacific in a desperate attempt to halt the Japanese forces that were rampaging across the region. With the conquest of Australia a very real possibility, the stakes were high. Their target: the Japanese-held Soloman Islands, in particular the southern island of Guadalcanal. Hamstrung by arcane pre-war thinking and a bureaucratic mind-set, the US Navy had to adapt on the fly in order to compete with the mighty Imperial Japanese Navy, whose ingenuity had fostered the creation of its Pacific empire.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Both sides told

  • By Davidsol Cometa on 05-09-18

More Historical Detail

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-20-18

I enjoyed this historical perspective including the good and the bad regarding the Army and Navy leadership on both sides.