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T. Prizer

Atlanta, GA
  • 11
  • reviews
  • 5
  • helpful votes
  • 24
  • ratings
  • In the Lake of the Woods

  • By: Tim O'Brien
  • Narrated by: L. J. Ganser
  • Length: 8 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 201
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 172
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 170

On a lake deep in the Minnesota woods, Kathy Wade comforts her husband John, a rising political star, after a devastating electoral defeat in which he's been pursued by rumors of the atrocities he committed in Vietnam. But it is clear that something is horribly wrong between them - too much has been hidden. Then Kathy vanishes, along with their boat.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Memory and the Erasure Thereof

  • By T. Prizer on 03-05-19

Memory and the Erasure Thereof

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-05-19

As powerful a display of storytelling as I’ve ever encountered. The effects of war, dreams deferred, dreams abandoned, love, and trauma — all set against the backdrop of the great Minnesota wilderness. O’Brien is fantastic, and Ganser narrates beautifully.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Bonobo and the Atheist

  • By: Frans de Waal
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis
  • Length: 9 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 462
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 413
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 411

In this lively and illuminating discussion of his landmark research, esteemed primatologist Frans de Waal argues that human morality is not imposed from above but instead comes from within. Moral behavior does not begin and end with religion but is in fact a product of evolution. For many years, de Waal has observed chimpanzees soothe distressed neighbors and bonobos share their food. Now he delivers fascinating fresh evidence for the seeds of ethical behavior in primate societies that further cements the case for the biological origins of human fairness.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Less science and more meditative

  • By Lisa on 06-10-13

The PERFECT narrator for a staggeringly brilliant work

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-01-19

This book goes further than anything I’ve read to complicate the relationship between religion and science. Should be read by absolutely everyone, regardless of faith or lack thereof. De Wall treats religion with the utmost respect despite being an atheist himself. In fact, he argues *for* its place in society, alongside science, rather than railing against it like so many of the “New Atheists” (he is damningly critical of Dawkins and Hitchens, showing that they too are dogmatists of the highest order).

A delightfully engaging book and a BRILLIANT narrator.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Things They Carried

  • By: Tim O'Brien
  • Narrated by: Bryan Cranston
  • Length: 7 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,350
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,732
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 7,701

Hailed by The New York Times as "a marvel of storytelling", The Things They Carried’s portrayal of the boots-on-the-ground experience of soldiers in the Vietnam War is a landmark in war writing. Now, three-time Emmy Award winner-Bryan Cranston, star of the hit TV series Breaking Bad, delivers an electrifying performance that walks the book’s hallucinatory line between reality and fiction and highlights the emotional power of the spoken word.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Heavy Load

  • By Mel on 10-28-13

Every word, written and read, heartbreaking and perfect

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-21-19

Is this the best book ever written? Anyone who too quickly answers “No” has not given this work its due. O’Brien’s words will at once crush you and lift you, break your heart and fill it with love. You’ll cry and laugh. You’ll choke back tears and feel your heart slithering up your throat. You’ll rue our country’s current disunion and wonder what it all was for, what it all meant, what it all means. And why. You’ll question your love of country, your right to life. And Bryan Cranston’s masterful performance will bring this all home for you unlike anything you can imagine. It doesn’t get any better than this.

  • Bird Box

  • A Novel
  • By: Josh Malerman
  • Narrated by: Cassandra Campbell
  • Length: 9 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,823
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,296
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 6,285

Something terrifying that must not be seen. One glimpse and a person is driven to deadly violence. No one knows what it is or where it came from.Five years after it began, a handful of scattered survivors remain, including Malorie and her two young children. Living in an abandoned house near the river, Malorie has long dreamed of fleeing to a place where her family might be safe. But the journey ahead will be terrifying: 20 miles downriver in a rowboat blindfolded with nothing to rely on but Malorie's wits and the children's trained ears. One wrong choice and they will die. And something is following them....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Don't look!

  • By Lesley on 05-22-14

Spotty narration, spotty writing, great story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-10-19

First off, this is 100% worth the listen. A fascinating tale that, love it or loathe it, won’t take more than 9 hours of your life. There are moments that you will think, “a stronger writer would have phrased that differently,” “a better narrator would have developed a far better persona and voice for that character,” and “maybe the author is divulging too much, too much description, not enough hanging in the balance.” But you will not once think that this story should not have been told in some form, that this book should not have been a written. Give it a listen and you’ll be better for it regardless of what you take away from it.

  • The Stranger in the Woods

  • The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit
  • By: Michael Finkel
  • Narrated by: Mark Bramhall
  • Length: 6 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,740
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,521
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,513

For readers and listeners of Jon Krakauer and The Lost City of Z, a remarkable tale of survival and solitude - the true story of a man who lived alone in a tent in the Maine woods, never talking to another person and surviving by stealing supplies from nearby cabins for 27 years.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A one-sitting listen

  • By NMwritergal on 04-20-18

Author’s reverence grows old

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-15-18

The author’s reverence for the so-called “hermit” is misguided and grows very old very quickly here. Christopher Knight did not leave behind modern society as much as he did selfishly unplug and plug back into it as he saw fit — preferring to live apart from society but nevertheless thieving from those firmly engaged in it. He could not have survived were it not for the society and its mass produced goods he sought to separate himself from. A fraud. That said, an interesting story well-narrated.

  • A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again

  • Essays and Arguments
  • By: David Foster Wallace
  • Narrated by: Paul Garcia
  • Length: 17 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 590
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 511
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 509

In this exuberantly praised book - a collection of seven pieces on subjects ranging from television to tennis, from the Illinois State Fair to the films of David Lynch, from postmodern literary theory to the supposed fun of traveling aboard a Caribbean luxury cruiseliner - David Foster Wallace brings to nonfiction the same curiosity, hilarity, and exhilarating verbal facility that has delighted readers of his fiction.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful book, terrible narration!

  • By Karen on 08-20-13

BEST book, WORST narrator EVER

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-08-18

I have never in my life found a clearer example of the fact that a GREAT book, read poorly, can be completely indigestible, intolerable, and loathsome. Anyone familiar with David Foster Wallace, especially those familiar with his speaking/reading voice, will be utterly appalled at Paul Garcia’s utter destruction of this unbelievably good book. His tone is haughty and contrived; Wallace’s is subdued, soothing, and understated. Garcia places emphasis in the strangest and most inexplicable of places, and he does so sentence after sentence after sentence. I found myself trying to picture the words, even imagine Wallace’s voice, while trying to block Garcia’s nauseating tone. But this proved impossible. Take in Wallace’s work like the air you breathe, but avoid this audiobook like the plague. Can we please get Robert Petkoff to read this???? ANYONE but Paul Garcia??

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress

  • By: Dai Sijie, Ina Rilke - translator
  • Narrated by: B.D. Wong
  • Length: 4 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 547
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 268
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 273

From within the hopelessness and terror of China's Cultural Revolution, Dai Sijie has fashioned a beguiling and unexpected story about the resilience of the human spirit, the wonder of romantic awakening, and the magical power of storytelling. "An unexpected miracle," raves the Los Angeles Times Book Review, "a delicate, and often hilarious, tale."

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Culture Shock

  • By Kelli on 02-27-03

BD Wong is awful

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-09-18

A perfectly fine story absolutely ruined by terrible, overly dramatic, aspirated narration from BD Wong. Wong reads every sentence as if it is THE most important sentence in the entire book, as if it is dripping with meaning and insight, when most of the sentences in this book are actually very simple, even-childlike. Not an enjoyable read by any stretch of the imagination.

  • This Is Water: The Original David Foster Wallace Recording

  • By: David Foster Wallace
  • Narrated by: David Foster Wallace
  • Length: 24 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 800
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 653
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 642

Only once did David Foster Wallace give a public talk on his views on life, during a commencement address given in 2005 at Kenyon College. This is the audio recording of David Foster Wallace delivering that very address. How does one keep from going through their comfortable, prosperous adult life unconsciously? How do we get ourselves out of the foreground of our thoughts and achieve compassion? The speech captures Wallace's electric intellect as well as his grace in attention to others.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The best 20 minutes of my life.

  • By John Nosal on 10-09-12

Brought me to tears

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-09-18

I read this speech years ago and found it compelling and thought provoking and delightful. But not until listening to this, to David Foster Wallace’s own reading of it, did its real power hit me. I listened to this for the first time while running around the track at my gym, and it hit me so hard I literally began crying mid-run. This is powerful and painful and wonderful and heartbreaking and uplifting. It is, as DFW says, “Capital-T Truth.”

  • I’ll Never Get Out of This World Alive

  • By: Steve Earle
  • Narrated by: Steve Earle
  • Length: 7 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 103
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 86
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 85

Doc Ebersole lives with the ghost of Hank Williams—not just in the figurative sense, not just because he was one of the last people to see him alive, and not just because he is rumored to have given Hank the final morphine dose that killed him.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The Down and Out get a spiritual renewal

  • By Bob on 06-04-12

Steve Earle's talents are endless -- a treasure!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-12-17

I've long considered Steve Earle one of our greatest living writers, but until now I had only done so in terms of his brilliant body of work as a singer/songwriter and musician. Sure, I'd read 'Doghouse Roses,' his collection of short stories, and I was highly impressed with it. But only now -- after reading his debut novel, 'I'll Never Get Out of This World Alive' -- has his vast talents as a writer of prose come fully into focus. What Earle has accomplished in this novel is no small feat: an unwaveringly empathetic view of the poor, the dispossessed, the addicted, and the lost; a cast of characters both living and dead, all equally believable and important to the narrative; a melding of old world and new world religion, of Catholicism and native belief systems; a deeply complex understanding of the fine line between morality and sin; and breathtaking portrayals of beauty and violence, of love and loss, of addiction and recovery. What's more, this is a book that must be LISTENED to. Whether you are a fan of audiobooks or not, you would be doing yourself and this novel a disservice to merely read its words. Earle's narration is beyond powerful, slipping seamlessly inside and outside of his characters, delivering his prose with force and grace and not the slightest hint of arrogance, and -- most wonderfully -- occasionally singing the words to the songs of Hank Williams (whose ghost haunts the novel's protagonist). This is an all-around ABSOLUTE MUST of a listen.

  • In Praise of Shadows

  • By: Junichiro Tanizaki
  • Narrated by: David Rintoul
  • Length: 1 hr and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 77
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 69
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 68

In Praise of Shadows is an eloquent tribute to the austere beauty of traditional Japanese aesthetics. Through architecture, ceramics, theatre, food, women, and even toilets, Tanizaki explains the essence of shadows and darkness, and how they are able to augment beauty. He laments the heavy electric lighting of the West and its introduction to Japan, and shows how the artificial, bright, and polished aesthetic of the West contrasts unfavorably with the moody and natural light of the East.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An interesting pov

  • By Mary on 05-26-18

Powerful evocation of materiality and its aura

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-07-17

In Praise of Shadows is as powerful an evocation of materiality's mysterious aura as anything ever composed. In breathtaking prose, Junichiro Tanizaki articulates the vital role of shadows (or the lack of direct light) not only in Japan's traditionally austere architectural design, but indeed in the long history of the Orient itself. He beautifully unpacks the power of shadows to render even the most everyday utensils and objects enchanting. Running throughout his essay is a dialogue of West vs. East -- of the harsh luminescence of Western lighting versus the warm embrace of the East's sparse use of light. This is essential reading not simply for those interested in Japanese culture and history, but rather for all who wish to further explore the power and agency of the material world. Sheer brilliance.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful