LISTENER

Armando L. Franco Carrillo

Ensenada, Mexico
  • 13
  • reviews
  • 47
  • helpful votes
  • 104
  • ratings
  • Lost and Found

  • The Taken Trilogy, Book 1
  • By: Alan Dean Foster
  • Narrated by: Oliver Wyman
  • Length: 10 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 477
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 426
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 430

Not so long ago Marcus Walker was just another young commodities trader in Chicago, working hard and playing harder. But that's all in the past, part of a life half forgotten-a reality that vanished when he was attacked while camping and tossed aboard a starship bound for deep space. Desperately, Walker searches for explanations, only to realize he's trapped in a horrifying nightmare that is all too real. Instead of being a rich hotshot at the top of the food chain, Walker discovers he's just another amusing novelty, part of a cargo of “cute” aliens from primitive planets....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Alien abduction with a twist

  • By Ken on 02-18-12

Great narrator, so-so story.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-19-14

I was expecting to laugh. Based on the descriptions, I thought this would be like a book by John Scalzi. It was not. I did not laugh. I did not care for the characters, and I will not be looking for the last two parts. The narrator did a great job, though: it is easy to know who is talking at any time by the voices he uses.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The Next Evolution of Marketing

  • Connect with Your Customers by Marketing with Meaning
  • By: Bob Gilbreath
  • Narrated by: Bruce Reizen
  • Length: 9 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 73
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 21
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 24

This groundbreaking audiobook takes you beyond relationship marketing and permission marketing and into the realm of the next big thing - meaningful marketing. This new concept addresses the modern consumer's desire for 1) fewer intrusive, hard-sell marketing messages and 2) more value-focused messages, independent of calls for purchase.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great marketing insights and valuable takeaways

  • By Olaf on 12-28-10

Not for SMALL entrepreneurs.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-10-13

The book mentions many examples of how to do meaningful marketing. Then, after several chapters, the author says: "And I am going to give you a way to apply it!". Then he starts talking about how you have to talk to your team for this, your team for that, your team, your team, your team. At one point, he says something like: "After all, what is a 30 million investment these days?".

The book says it is good for entrepreneurs, but it is better suited for marketing vicepresidents with huge budgets and teams.

It gets three stars because it has several good ideas, but the implementation plan lost me. I think a book that gives an easier to implement plan for small businesses is Duct Tape Marketing.

  • Fuzzy Nation

  • By: John Scalzi
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton, John Scalzi - introduction
  • Length: 7 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,611
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,756
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,764

In John Scalzi's re-imagining of H. Beam Piper's 1962 sci-fi classic Little Fuzzy, written with the full cooperation of the Piper Estate, Jack Holloway works alone for reasons he doesnt care to talk about. Hundreds of miles from ZaraCorps headquarters on planet, 178 light-years from the corporations headquarters on Earth, Jack is content as an independent contractor, prospecting and surveying at his own pace. As for his past, thats not up for discussion.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Short, sweet, and satisfying storytelling.

  • By Samuel Montgomery-Blinn on 05-11-11

I was laughing aloud.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-16-13

I was hesitant to get this audio book because I read many negative comments on Amazon, but I like Scazi and Wheaton, so for it anyway, and I am glad I did.

The characters are interesting. The main one is insufferable and likeable at the same time.

I have still to finish the original book, but this one stands on its own.

  • The Black Swan

  • The Impact of the Highly Improbable
  • By: Nassim Nicholas Taleb
  • Narrated by: David Chandler
  • Length: 14 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5,071
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,530
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,524

Maverick thinker Nassim Nicholas Taleb had an illustrious career on Wall Street before turning his focus to his black swan theory. Not all swans are white, and not all events, no matter what the experts think, are predictable. Taleb shows that black swans, like 9/11, cannot be foreseen and have an immeasurable impact on the world.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Worth it in the end...I think.

  • By Judd Bagley on 05-27-09

Interesting but hard to listen.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-21-12

There are several interesting concepts, specially the fallacies. Several people have complained about the narrator, but I set the playback at triple speed and it was easy to understand and not boring.

At the last three hours, when speaking of fractals, the author is so arrogant (this guy was my only living teacher. All my other teachers are books. He was the only one who understood the black swan and the misuse of the Bell curve, on and on) that it was too distracting.

I like what he has to say, but prefer the way "the invisble gorilla" and "thinking, fast and slow" have exposed it.

  • See What I'm Saying: The Extraordinary Powers of Our Five Senses

  • By: Lawrence D. Rosenblum
  • Narrated by: Lawrence D. Rosenblum
  • Length: 11 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 40
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 28
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 24

In this revealing romp through the mysteries of human perception, University of California psychologist and researcher Lawrence Rosenblum explores the astonishing abilities of the five senses - skills of which most of us are remarkably unaware. Drawing on groundbreaking insights into the brain's plasticity and integrative powers, including findings from his own research, Rosenblum examines how our brains use the subtlest information to perceive the world.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • One of the most entertaining and fluent text books

  • By Karina on 09-20-16

Some interesting facts, it was a chore to finish i

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-23-12

Would you try another book from Lawrence D. Rosenblum and/or Lawrence D. Rosenblum?

I am not sure. I did not hate it, but I was not looking forward to listen to it either. I learned some stuff, but it was boring to hear about a series of experiments and results without practical application.

What did you like best about this story?

It had interesting facts amid all the experiments.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

He sounded excited many times at things that were not very exciting for me: "You can not distinguish DA and GA!". I felt like saying: "and so what?" many times during the book.

Did See What I'm Saying: The Extraordinary Powers of Our Five Senses inspire you to do anything?

Not really. Maybe perform a couple of experiments some day.

  • Mistakes Were Made (But Not By Me)

  • Why We Justify Foolish Beliefs, Bad Decisions and Hurtful Acts
  • By: Carol Tavris, Elliot Aronson
  • Narrated by: Marsha Mercant, Joe Barrett
  • Length: 9 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,715
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,371
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,368

Why do people dodge responsibility when things fall apart? Why the parade of public figures unable to own up when they screw up? Why the endless marital quarrels over who is right? Why can we see hypocrisy in others but not in ourselves? Are we all liars? Or do we really believe the stories we tell? Backed by years of research and delivered in lively, energetic prose, Mistakes Were Made (But Not by Me) offers a fascinating explanation of self-deception.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent insights, but a little too long

  • By Anand on 11-11-12

It almost got 5 stars from me.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-22-12

If you could sum up Mistakes Were Made (But Not By Me) in three words, what would they be?

"They are right" In their minds, everyone is always right, and can't go back. If the authors had given more solutions, I would have given the book 5 stars. Even without solutions it is a great book that raises a great point.

What other book might you compare Mistakes Were Made (But Not By Me) to and why?

Getting out of no, that mentions you need to create a golden bridge for the other party to retreat out of their position. Mistakes were made explains again and again why they will not go back, using the pyramid model to show how by taking small steps from a common point two people can end up having a huge wall between them.How to win friends, because it says: "don't complain nor criticize" and that people do not take blame for anything. The demon haunted world, because it talks about UFO abductions and cults.

Which scene was your favorite?

The one with the couples, because it was one of the few sections that proposed solutions.

If you could give Mistakes Were Made (But Not By Me) a new subtitle, what would it be?

Why they will not go back.

Any additional comments?

I loved the female narrator's voice and style. It is so easy to listen to her, I will look for another book read by her.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • What Every BODY Is Saying

  • An Ex-FBI Agent’s Guide to Speed-Reading People
  • By: Joe Navarro, Marvin Karlins
  • Narrated by: Paul Costanzo
  • Length: 7 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,217
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 3,602
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,579

Listen to this book and send your nonverbal intelligence soaring. Joe Navarro, a former FBI counterintelligence officer and a recognized expert on nonverbal behavior, explains how to "speed-read" people: decode sentiments and behaviors, avoid hidden pitfalls, and look for deceptive behaviors. You'll also learn how your body language can influence what your boss, family, friends, and strangers think of you.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Let Me Hear Your Body Talk

  • By Cynthia on 07-06-13

Very informative.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-27-12

Would you listen to What Every BODY Is Saying again? Why?

I will listen to it again, because one listening is not enough to absorb all the tips it has on how to get and interpret cues on what people are feeling.

What other book might you compare What Every BODY Is Saying to and why?

The power of body language, because they talk about the same subject.

What about Paul Costanzo’s performance did you like?

I can understand him even at thrice the speed.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

I loved his chapter on how hard it is to detect deception, and cautioning listeners about the dangers and abuse that can result.

Any additional comments?

Before getting it, I read reviews complaining about two issues:
a) The need to check a PDF. I found this to be a good thing. This way I don't have to imagine everything. I printed it on two pages per sheet, both sides, and got an 8-sheet booklet, very practical.
b) The narrative being dull. I listened to it at thrice the speed, and was interesting. At normal speed it may result too slow. Fortunately, the audible app has that speed setting.

  • Brain Rules

  • 12 Principles for Surviving and Thriving at Work, Home, and School
  • By: John J. Medina
  • Narrated by: John J. Medina
  • Length: 7 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,912
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,163
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,164

Most of us have no idea what's really going on inside our heads. Yet brain scientists have uncovered details every business leader, parent, and teacher should know - such as the brain's need for physical activity to work at its best. How do we learn? What exactly do sleep and stress do to our brains? Why is multi-tasking a myth? Why is it so easy to forget - and so important to repeat new information? Is it true that men and women have different brains?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My favorite book for students.

  • By Beenre on 03-28-09

Funny, witty and informative.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-22-12

What did you love best about Brain Rules?

It talks about what brains do and cites experiments that talk about it. It offers bibliography that can be used to check it out. It is very funny and entertaining. It made me laugh several times.

On the other hand, I have used some of its explanations when training someone, and it makes a lot of sense to them. It actually helps me teach.

What did you like best about this story?

It is non-technical and fun.

Which scene was your favorite?

There were several. A fragment of one of them was:

"... we came from Africa somewhere between 7 and 10 million years ago. Virtually everything else is disputed by some cranky professional somewhere...For the first few million years, we mostly just grabbed rocks and smashed into things. Scientists, perhaps trying to salvage some of our dignity, call these stones 'hand-axes". A million years later, our progress was still not very impressing: we still grabbed 'hand-axes', but we began to smash them into other rocks making them more pointed. Now we had 'sharper-rocks'...".

What did you learn from Brain Rules that you would use in your daily life?

Techniques on attention, presentations, exercise and other topics.

Any additional comments?

It was a great listen, and I will be looking forward to other books from this author.

  • Time Management Made Simple

  • By: Brian Tracy
  • Narrated by: Brian Tracy
  • Length: 10 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 477
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 402
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 400

Brian Tracy is the top time management trainer in the world today - in 38 languages and 56 countries. In Time Management Made Simple he teaches you the best ideas learned worldwide in 30 years of research and teaching.In this fast-moving 12 lecture program, you will learn how to manage every aspect of your time and life - more efficiently than ever before! Plus this SPECIAL BONUS! More than $100 worth of online resources to improve your time management skills; plus one month of free access to am online learning program....

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A Cut-and-Paste Book

  • By Alexandra on 04-27-14

Repetitive, self-serving and lacking references.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-12

What disappointed you about Time Management Made Simple?

I saw it was over 10 hours long and thought it would be very complete. It was not. It is very repetitive. About one hour before the end, Brian even says : "don't worry about the material being repetitive, it's good to hear good ideas several times". When I want to listen to good ideas several times, I expect to listen to the audiobook again, not hear it time and time and again in the same program. I suspect the real reason is that this is a loosely related collection that was put together to inflate the playing time.

For those familiar with Myer-Briggs Type Indicator, he is a super judger, and in his mind that is the way to be. Make all decisions now, throw away everything, when in doubt throw it out, and so on.

Besides, Brian is very self-serving. It sounds like he's making a shameless commercial time and time again. For instance, something that goes on for several minutes is summarized as: "An audio program is equivalent to reading 35 books. You should always listen to audio programs in your car. I produce many audioprograms. With no exception, everyone who listens to my programs does a LO better one year later".

Lastly, he makes all these claims: "scientists have discovered so and so". Which scientists, where was it published, where can I check it out?

What could Brian Tracy have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

He could have summarized his points, be less self-promoting, offer names for his stories, be less patronizing.

Any additional comments?

There are several better books, succinct and to the point. "Getting it done" is a very good one. "First things first", although not my favorite, is by far better than this one.

39 of 43 people found this review helpful

  • Your Brain at Work

  • Strategies for Overcoming Distraction, Regaining Focus, and Working Smarter All Day Long
  • By: David Rock
  • Narrated by: Bob Walter
  • Length: 9 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,991
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,360
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,327

Meet Emily and Paul: The parents of two young children, Emily is the newly promoted VP of marketing at a large corporation while Paul works from home or from clients' offices as an independent IT consultant. Their lives, like all of ours, are filled with a bewildering blizzard of emails, phone calls, yet more emails, meetings, projects, proposals, and plans. Just staying ahead of the storm has become a seemingly insurmountable task.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting Insights into the Brain

  • By Tom Johnson on 11-28-12

Great listen.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-15-12

What made the experience of listening to Your Brain at Work the most enjoyable?

The book is full of insights on how the brain works and why people react the way they do. It also provides several tips on how to use this knowledge on practical situations.

What about Bob Walter’s performance did you like?

As in most my reviews, I like when I can set the speed to three times as fast an still understand the reader.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

The title is perfect: