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  • reviews
  • 120
  • helpful votes
  • 30
  • ratings
  • Big Fish

  • By: Thomas Perry
  • Narrated by: Joe Barrett
  • Length: 6 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 47
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 44
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 44

Powerfully plotted and funny, Big Fish follows dangerous and mysterious Los Angeles entrepreneur Altmeyer, and his wife Rachel, whose quiet lives in the Hollywood hills are disrupted when a multi-million-dollar gunrunning deal goes bad. Under most circumstances, Altmeyer might be mildly amused by the audacity of the double-cross. But whoever cheated Altmeyer may also be planning to destroy the world. With so much at stake, Altmeyer and Rachel and their friend, super-agent to the stars Bucky Carmichael, set off on a perilous adventure in search of the identity of the Big Fish. 

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A let down

  • By Dr. on 09-28-18

One of Perry's earliest

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-06-18

I have listened to all of Perry's audiobooks and am a big fan. This however was a disappointment. It's just been released as an audiobook but it was actually written in 1985, long before Perry hit his stride. There is none of the hide and seek character of his latest works, and little evidence of the sardonic humor that I usually enjoy in his works. Just a bring down the bad guy novel. Read the more recent works first, and put this last on your Perry list.

  • Hue 1968

  • A Turning Point of the American War in Vietnam
  • By: Mark Bowden
  • Narrated by: Joe Barrett
  • Length: 18 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,284
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,195
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,185

By January 1968, despite an influx of half a million American troops, the fighting in Vietnam seemed to be at a stalemate. Yet General William Westmoreland, commander of American forces, announced a new phase of the war in which "the end begins to come into view". The North Vietnamese had different ideas. In mid-1967, the leadership in Hanoi had started planning an offensive intended to win the war in a single stroke.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • I KNEW This Book Would Sting Me . . . .

  • By Bee Keeper on 07-28-17

Good narrative.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-06-18

Mark Bowden was not alive 50 years ago when the battle of Hue was fought, and he makes his story an introductory one for his own generation, explaining the basics of the Vietnam War and making a good case that that the Battle of Hue was indeed the turning point of the whole ill-fated enterprise. I served a tour as a soldier in Vietnam in 1965-66, a couple of years before the Tet Offensive of which the Hue battle was just one part, albeit an important one. I've also visited Hue, in 2006, so I could relate the geography better than most readers. I listened to the book on a trip to China and found it a very good way to pass the travel time. Bowden's analysis is comprehensive and convincing, with lots of attention to the strategic level misunderstandings of the enemy, the war, and in particular the evidence for his thesis that the American public was deliberately misled about the progress of the conflict and the likelihood for a positive outcome. It's a little weak on the ground level troops' experience and individual traumas. Deaths are recounted matter-of-factly. Bowden is no soldier himself, and that shows. Barrett's narration is professional and dispassionate. I recommend the book.

  • 14

  • By: Peter Clines
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 12 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39,839
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36,905
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 36,910

There are some odd things about Nate’s new apartment. Of course, he has other things on his mind. He hates his job. He has no money in the bank. No girlfriend. No plans for the future. So while his new home isn’t perfect, it’s livable. The rent is low, the property managers are friendly, and the odd little mysteries don’t nag at him too much. At least, not until he meets Mandy, his neighbor across the hall, and notices something unusual about her apartment. And Xela’s apartment. And Tim’s. And Veek’s.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not my thing...

  • By Amazon Customer on 04-18-17

Left me cold

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-03-18

I'll stipulate that science fantasy is not my genre, but this did nothing to change my mind. The first half was somewhat engaging, as a new tenant moves into an 1895 Los Angeles apartment building and meets some oddball characters. It takes rather too long for the weirdness of the building's characteristics to come forth, and it is never explained why the police or at least building inspectors were never contacted before the tenants started tearing down walls and bodies started to turn up. But the book really lost me when the killer squids darkened the sky. The 18th century "science" was not credible but I guess that goes with the genre. The narrator did a passable job. All in all, it was a waste of time.

26 of 29 people found this review helpful

  • Mila 18

  • By: Leon Uris
  • Narrated by: David deVries
  • Length: 21 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 68
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 63
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 63

It was a time of crisis, a time of tragedy - and a time of transcendent courage and determination. Leon Uris’s blazing novel is set in the midst of the ghetto uprising that defied Nazi tyranny, as the Jews of Warsaw boldly met Wehrmacht tanks with homemade weapons and bare fists. Here, painted on a canvas as broad as its subject matter, is the compelling story of one of the most heroic struggles of modern times.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • True Heroism

  • By Shmuel M on 05-13-18

I wasw hoping for a lot better

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-03-18

I waited eagerly for this to appear as an audiobook a few weeks ago, but I was disappointed upon listening to it. First, it is much too long, filled with pointless diversions and numerous characters who add litle to the narrative. The reader is pedestrian, just a reader and not a performer. The dialogue is not the way anyone speaks. Mila 18 seems to be obsessed with proving the point that Jews are not cowards, but the character development is so shallow that the point is made wholly through Andre, a former cavalry officer steeped in war. The interpersonal and particulrly the romantic relationships are clumsy. The Nazis are villainous enough, but what of the Poles? They barely appear, though the one abiding question today is the extent of their collaboration and aqiescense to anti-Semitism. A much better book on the Warsaw ghetto is The Wall by Herman Wouk.

  • King Rat

  • The Epic Novel of War and Survival
  • By: James Clavell
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 15 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 523
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 474
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 470

The time is World War II. The place is a brutal prison camp deep in Japanese-occupied territory. Here, within the seething mass of humanity, one man, an American corporal, seeks dominance over both captives and captors alike. His weapons are human courage, unblinking understanding of human weaknesses, and total willingness to exploit every opportunity to enlarge his power and corrupt or destroy anyone who stands in his path.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Lord of the Flies; Lord of the Rats. One Together

  • By J.B. on 08-12-16

How not to behave as a prisoner of war

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-04-18

I read this decades ago and remembered it as a gritty counterpart to Stalag 17, but it has more in common with The Bridge over the River Kwai. It’s set in a Japanese prison camp in Southeast Asia, with a few Americans among thousands of Brits and Aussies. The King, an American corporal, knows how to survive handsomely, and garners a lot of power., just like the William Holden character in Kwai.
Clavell clearly prefers the values of the British officer class, but not many of them come off any better. Simon Vance imparts just the right Pommie inflections. The few deflections to the home front don’t add much. It’s hardly an “epic novel of war” but nevertheless a very good read. It won’t make you feel proud to be an American.

  • The Devil's Code

  • By: John Sandford
  • Narrated by: Frank Muller
  • Length: 5 hrs and 31 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 124
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 53
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 52

Before Lucas Davenport and the brilliant Prey novels, there was Kidd (artist, computer whiz, and professional criminal) and his sometimes partner/sometimes lover, LuEllen. The army left Kidd with a dislike for bureaucracy and the skills to do something about it, but it didn't prepare him for the day a woman would call and tell him his colleague Jack Morrison is dead.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Sandford and Muller

  • By lee on 06-07-05

Save your money

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-04-18

I bought this solely because it was performed by the late Frank Muller. Muller did his usual fine job, but it was not enough to rescue this tedious story. The computer code stuff left me cold, and the boy girl search team was trite. This is the only book read by Muller that I could not finish.

  • The Heavens May Fall

  • By: Allen Eskens
  • Narrated by: R. C. Bray, David Colacci, Amy McFadden
  • Length: 9 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,366
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,980
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,964

Detective Max Rupert's and attorney Boady Sanden's friendship is being pushed to the breaking point. Max is convinced that Jennavieve Pruitt was killed by her husband, Ben. Boady is equally convinced that Ben, his client, is innocent. As the case unfolds, the two are forced to confront their own personal demons.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 2017 Audie Nominee

  • By Bob on 02-20-17

No Turow but a pretty good read

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-04-18

This book was not very sophisticated, and the performance was average, but in the end I recommend it for those who really like courtroom drama. Scott Turow could have done a lot more with the material. An out to pasture lawyer takes on the seemingly hopeless murder case of his former law partner, accused of killing his wife. An eyewitness saw him enter the house at the time of his murder, while he claimed to be 600 miles away. Alternative suspects abound. The denouement was convincingly masked, though the final resolution was klunky.

  • You Belong to Me

  • A Novel
  • By: Colin Harrison
  • Narrated by: Robert Petkoff
  • Length: 12 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 363
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 342
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 340

Paul Reeves is a successful immigration lawyer, but his passion is collecting old maps of New York, tangible records of the city's rich history in an increasingly digital world. One afternoon he attends an auction with his neighbor Jennifer Mehraz, the beautiful young wife of an Iranian financier-lawyer, but halfway through the auction a handsome man in soldier fatigues appears in the aisle and whisks Jennifer away.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • It's a man's book

  • By E. on 07-08-17

Story moved right along

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-19-17

A fairly usual action/suspense yarn, sprinkled with social commentary on contemporary New York, I would say an average read, which means I enjoyed it and finished it in three days. Petkoff did a good professional job as narrator. The central character is a 50-year-old immigration lawyer and map collector, with an active sex life. Plenty of murders, including of characters I expected to be there at the end.

  • Round the Bend

  • By: Nevil Shute
  • Narrated by: John Telfer
  • Length: 13 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 175
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 152
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 153

When Tom Cutter hires Constantine Shaklin as an engineer in his air-freight business, he little realises the extraordinary gifts of his new recruit. Shaklin possesses a religious power which inspires everyone he meets to a new faith and hope for humanity. As Cutter’s business grows across Asia, so does Shaklin’s fame, until he is widely regarded as a unifying deity. Though he struggles to believe Shaklin is indeed divine, Cutter too finds solace in his friend’s teachings, and commits to passing on his message.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A wonderful book

  • By Gavin Scott on 07-14-11

This One will Stick With You

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-26-16

I first read this book in 1964, then listened to the audiobook in 2012. It's now 5 years later and I still remember it dearly and clearly, which is rare for me. It's classic Nevil Shute. He was Britain's most popular writer in the 1950s. Shute's writing draws you in and never lets you go. It features an earnest and level headed entrepreneur who starts an airline in the far east, and much of it a winning story of the growth of the business. This is old English values. It's also a complicated story of evangelism (not Christian) among the colonized people of India, Egypt, Singapore and that turns out to be fascinating. I lent this to a friend and he has now been through nearly all of Nevil Shute. John Teifer is a good narrator, warm and sympathetic in an English way. He's not Frank Muller, who did several other Shute novels including Pastoral and Trustee From the Toolroom. I go through an audiobook about every 10 days and write few reviews, but this is such a gem that I need to pass the word on.

  • Poacher's Son

  • By: Paul Doiron
  • Narrated by: Henry Leyva
  • Length: 9 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 762
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 681
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 684

Set in the wilds of Maine, this is an explosive tale of an estranged son thrust into the hunt for a murderous fugitive - his own father. Game warden Mike Bowditch returns home one evening to find an alarming voice from the past on his answering machine: his father, Jack, a hard-drinking womanizer who makes his living poaching illegal game. An even more frightening call comes the next morning from the police: They are searching for the man who killed a beloved local cop the night before - and his father is their prime suspect.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very good writer -

  • By S. on 10-02-15

Backwoods Maine location

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-26-16

Kept thinking this was a young adult novel. Not at all sophisticated, characters are pretty shallow, and it centers on a young game warden's relationship with his father and others he knew as a 15-year-old. The father is accused of a cowardly murder and of course the game warden sets out to prove his innocence. Doiron uses the upstate Maine location well. Leyva's narration is competent and he gets the deep New England inflection well enough. There's so much angst about whether Mike chose the right career or not that it was a disappointment not to get a revelation at the end. All in all it was worth the time and money I spent but will not be among the more memorable books of the year.