LISTENER

Brian Losabia

Round Rock, TX
  • 3
  • reviews
  • 9
  • helpful votes
  • 7
  • ratings
  • Pride and Prejudice

  • By: Jane Austen
  • Narrated by: Rosamund Pike
  • Length: 11 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 13,398
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 12,230
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 12,176

One of Jane Austen’s most beloved works, Pride and Prejudice, is vividly brought to life by Academy Award nominee Rosamund Pike ( Gone Girl). In her bright and energetic performance of this British classic, she expertly captures Austen’s signature wit and tone. Her attention to detail, her literary background, and her performance in the 2005 feature film version of the novel provide the perfect foundation from which to convey the story of Elizabeth Bennett, her four sisters, and the inimitable Mr. Darcy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Truth Universally Acknowledged

  • By Gretchen SLP on 12-10-15

What an experience!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-08-16

This was my first Jane Austen book, and I could not have asked for a better experience than to have listened to Rosamund Pike's tremendous performance of Pride and Prejudice. This book had me laughing, crying, whooping in delight, and groaning in sympathy at various times (usually as I was driving in rush hour traffic), and when I was forced to stop listening by my arriving at work or home, I found myself very much looking forward to my next listening session. Pike's performance delivered powerfully emotional scenes -- without being melodramatic! -- and her cultured-sounding narration seemed a perfect fit for the material. Thank you Audible and Rosamund Pike for this excellent bit of storytelling.

  • Brave Girl Eating

  • A Family's Struggle with Anorexia
  • By: Harriet Brown
  • Narrated by: Harriet Brown
  • Length: 8 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 82
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 73
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 73

Millions of families are affected by eating disorders, which usually strike young women between the ages of fourteen and twenty. But current medical practice ties these families' hands when it comes to helping their children recover. Conventional medical wisdom dictates separating the patient from the family and insists that 'it's not about the food', even as a family watches a child waste away before their eyes.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • informative

  • By Mom/RN on 03-05-15

Angry Author Narrating

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-22-14

Brave Girl Eating is a mother's memoir describing the time when anorexia emerged in her 14 year old daughter's life. As a person without anorexia, I was mainly interested in this book to try to learn more about the disease, its causes, and cures. I had no particularly great interest in anorexia specifically, and took a bit of a chance on this book after its being recommended to me by Audible. My main criticism of this book is probably the venomous and angry voice of the author as she recounted her interactions with various health care professionals, insurance people, and even her family members. I can imagine that this book might be useful to other families touched by eating disorders, either as a comforting note of solidarity, or as a field journal from one particular implementation of family based treatment for anorexia. For me, the author's own ambivalence about food, and aforementioned acerbic tone, detracted from the book's attempts to shed light on various theories on the origins of eating disorders, and different treatment options. Also, bear in mind that the author is a not a medical professional by trade, and what she is doing is passing along her own ruminations on different studies, medical journal entries, and articles. I do believe that the author was trying to get helpful information out to the families of eating disorder sufferers, and yet I also think that she used this book to do a goodly amount of spleen venting.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Getting to Yes

  • Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In
  • By: Roger Fisher, William Ury
  • Narrated by: Dennis Boutsikaris
  • Length: 6 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,887
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,249
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,216

Getting to Yes is a straightorward, universally applicable method for negotiating personal and professional disputes without getting taken - and without getting angry. It offers a concise, step-by-step, proven strategy for coming to mutually acceptable agreements in every sort of conflict - whether it involves parents and children, neighbors, bosses and employees, customers or corporations, tenants or diplomats.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Maybe I Could Go to Four and One-Half Stars

  • By John on 01-14-12

Great ideas but so-so narration. Worth buying yet.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-12-12

As one whose makeup leads to conflict avoidance in most negotiations, I thought -- correctly -- that Getting To Yes might contain a few concepts, approaches, and tactics which would be valuable to me. I can confirm that there is much wisdom in this book, but I did find the narration to be a little difficult to follow. The 30-second replay was employed many, many, times during the listening of this book in order to jump back in an effort to understand what was just said. I am going to buy the print (e-book) version of this title so that I might more fully understand the teachings; bulleted lists and section headings are fine in print, but in this case did not translate well to the spoken word. Even with the troublesome narration, I found this book to be well worth the money.

8 of 9 people found this review helpful