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  • 26
  • reviews
  • 103
  • helpful votes
  • 30
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  • Edgedancer

  • From the Stormlight Archive
  • By: Brandon Sanderson
  • Narrated by: Kate Reading
  • Length: 6 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,058
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 8,362
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,330

Three years ago, Lift asked a goddess to stop her from growing older - a wish she believed was granted. Now, in Edgedancer, the barely teenage nascent Knight Radiant finds that time stands still for no one.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Warning: This is a duplicate from Arcanum Unbound

  • By Robert J Petri on 11-18-17

Good story but I hate Lift

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-12-18

Sanderson wrote this novella to fill a gap inbetween books 1 and 2. I really did not like Lift so I groaned heavily when I realized it was about her.

The story itself is interesting and Kate Reading's narration makes Lift bearable. Lift has followed Darkness to another land and discovers that another like her is in danger. #UnlikeleyHero #Magical #tagsgiving #sweepstakes

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Way of Kings

  • Book One of The Stormlight Archive
  • By: Brandon Sanderson
  • Narrated by: Kate Reading, Michael Kramer
  • Length: 45 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 59,251
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 53,887
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 53,882

Roshar is a world of stone and storms. Uncanny tempests of incredible power sweep across the rocky terrain so frequently that they have shaped ecology and civilization alike. Animals hide in shells, trees pull in branches, and grass retracts into the soilless ground. Cities are built only where the topography offers shelter. It has been centuries since the fall of the ten consecrated orders known as the Knights Radiant, but their Shardblades and Shardplate remain: mystical swords and suits of armor.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wow - 45 hours long and leaves you wanting more!

  • By Lore on 03-31-12

Worth the 45 hours

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

I don't even know where to begin with this story! It was so epic!

The book begins with the assassination of a king and branches out to follow several different people.

It is very much in the same vein as Lightbringer by Brent Weeks.

  • Second Hand Curses

  • By: Drew Hayes
  • Narrated by: Scott Aiello, Marc Vietor, Tavia Gilbert
  • Length: 9 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,215
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4,960
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,958

When your fairy godmother threatens to enslave you with a curse - when a malevolent piper solves your rat problem but steals your children - when you seek revenge on the prince who turned you into a frog - who can you turn to in your hour of need? The band of scoundrels known far and wide as the Bastard Champions - the swashbuckling trio who travel a world of legend, seeking adventure and righting wrongs - as long as there's enough gold to be earned.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic

  • By Carla on 11-22-17

Fresh take on fractured fairy tales

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-17-18

A group of three adventurers solve various fractured fairy tales while on a larger quest. Having a different narrator for each character wss great and made following the story easier. Hoping for a sequel.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Dangerous

  • By: Milo Yiannopoulos
  • Narrated by: Milo Yiannopoulos
  • Length: 6 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 3,306
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3,072
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 3,061

The liberal media machine did everything they could to keep this book out of your hands. Now, finally, Dangerous, the most controversial book of the decade, is tearing down safe spaces everywhere.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Do I Dare to give less than 5 🌟🌟?

  • By GIJaneB4 on 09-30-17

A Dangerous Listen

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-14-17

Even though I already had the Kindle version of this book, I had to get the audio also. A good thing too, because Milo added things to the audio edition.
In this book, Milo talks about the various groups of people who hate him and why. It's an interesting look at politics and culture by someone who's not afraid to speak his mind.
Audible 20 Review Sweepstakes entry

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Rain Reign

  • By: Ann M. Martin
  • Narrated by: Laura Hamilton
  • Length: 4 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,172
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,050
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,046

Rose Howard has OCD, Asperger's syndrome, and an obsession with homonyms (even her name is a homonym). She gave her dog Rain a name with two homonyms (Reign, Rein), which, according to Rose's rules of homonyms, is very special. Rain was a lost dog Rose's father brought home. Rose and Rain are practically inseparable. And they are often home alone, as Rose's father spends most evenings at a bar, and doesn't have much patience for his special-needs daughter.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beautiful; touched my heart; made me cry!

  • By Wayne on 03-02-16

Comperable to The Curious Incident of the Dog

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-13-16

Rose is a fifth grader with high functioning Autism who is obsessed with homonyms, rules and prime numbers. She lives with her father and her dog Rain. Her uncle lives nearby and takes her to school and on various outings. Rose constantly points out when she sees rules being broken (including traffic rules) and blurts out prime numbers when stressed. She has issues in school as a result and has her own aide in the classroom. Of everyone in her life, her uncle is the most tolerant of her odd behavior.

A hurricane sweeps through the town and Rain is lost in the storm. The rest of the book chronicles Rose's search for her dog.

I thought the narrator did a good job of portraying Rose's character. It reminded me a lot of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime.

  • Killing the Rising Sun

  • How America Vanquished World War II Japan
  • By: Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard
  • Narrated by: Robert Petkoff, Bill O'Reilly
  • Length: 9 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 8,636
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 7,731
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 7,692

Autumn 1944. World War II is nearly over in Europe but is escalating in the Pacific, where American soldiers face an opponent who will go to any length to avoid defeat. The Japanese army follows the samurai code of Bushido, stipulating that surrender is a form of dishonor. Killing the Rising Sun takes listeners to the bloody tropical-island battlefields of Peleliu and Iwo Jima and to the embattled Philippines, where General Douglas MacArthur has made a triumphant return and is plotting a full-scale invasion of Japan.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Bill O'Reilly paints an amazing picture.

  • By Carmen Ohio on 07-16-17

The Latest in the "Killing" Series

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-13-16

I initially hesitated in getting this book after the last book, Killing Reagan, fell short of my expectations. But since it was getting great reviews, I decided to give it a listen.

Like Killing Reagan, the book is not read by Bill O'Reilly (with the exception of a chapter at the beginning and the end). However, the narrator is fine. This book deviates from the others by not talking about the killing of a specific person, rather the "killing" of a nation, in this case, Japan. I thought this was a great companion to Killing Patton which details much of World War II in the European theater, while this details the part of World War II fought in the Pacific theater. Like most of the other books in the "killing" series, the book reads like a thriller with lots of action and anticipation. It jumps around from place to place, the different battles of the war, General MacArthur, the Manhattan Project, Harry Truman and his meeting with Churchill and Stalin, and happenings in Japan. Many of the war crimes committed by the Japanese are detailed as well.

Overall, I thought it was a definite improvement after Killing Reagan. It is a definite read for any World War II history buffs.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • NeuroTribes

  • The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity
  • By: Steve Silberman
  • Narrated by: William Hughes
  • Length: 18 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,618
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,458
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,454

What is autism: a lifelong disability or a naturally occurring form of cognitive difference akin to certain forms of genius? In truth, it is both of these things and more - and the future of our society depends on our understanding it. Wired reporter Steve Silberman unearths the secret history of autism, long suppressed by the same clinicians who became famous for discovering it, and finds surprising answers to the crucial question of why the number of diagnoses has soared in recent years.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Good Contrast to "In a Different Key"

  • By Gadget on 06-01-16

Good Contrast to "In a Different Key"

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-01-16

I listened to "In a Different Key" a few months ago and then I found out about this book.

In a Different Key looks at the history of Autism through parents and their children with Autism and follows the history of different theories and treatment options (with an in depth look at "refrigerator mothers" and the vaccine controversy) as well as looking at parent advocacy.

Neurotribes looks more at adults with Autism, touching on important psychologists in Autism's history but also looking at the accomplishments of people with Autism. The correlation between giftedness/intelligence and Autism is explored along with advocacy by people with Autism.

As a parent with two children with Autism and a certified teacher for special education, I found both books to be enlightening. "In a Different Key" helped me to see what parents had done before me to get services for their odd children while "Neurotribes" showed me hope for my children's futures.

So read/listen to both in order to get a more complete picture.

64 of 65 people found this review helpful

  • Ready Player One

  • By: Ernest Cline
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 15 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 215,399
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 201,143
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 200,725

At once wildly original and stuffed with irresistible nostalgia, Ready Player One is a spectacularly genre-busting, ambitious, and charming debut—part quest novel, part love story, and part virtual space opera set in a universe where spell-slinging mages battle giant Japanese robots, entire planets are inspired by Blade Runner, and flying DeLoreans achieve light speed.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I’m sorry I waited so long to read this book.

  • By Julie W. Capell on 05-27-14

Blown Away

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-04-16

I was very impressed by Wil Wheaton's reading of Redshirts so when I heard about this book and that he was the narrator, I had to give it a listen. His speaking voice is so pleasant and easy to listen to and he does the voices awesomely.

So, if you like Wil Wheaton, getting this book is worth it just for the narration.

As for the actual book itself, it is a masterpiece of everything nerd, geek, gamer and 80's. I was born in the middle of the 80's so I understood most of the references (although, I admit, I haven't played any of the games in this book or seen about half of the movies references, but I know of them).

P.S. I totally called the significance of the quarter.

  • In a Different Key

  • The Story of Autism
  • By: John Donvan, Caren Zucker
  • Narrated by: Kaleo Griffith
  • Length: 23 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 139
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 129
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 130

Nearly 75 years ago, Donald Triplett of Forest, Mississippi, became the first child diagnosed with autism. Beginning with his family's odyssey, In a Different Key tells the extraordinary story of this often misunderstood condition and of the civil rights battles waged by the families of those who have it. Unfolding over decades, it is a beautifully rendered history of ordinary people determined to secure a place in the world for those with autism.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fact based History and shows how science works

  • By Gary on 02-13-16

The New Book on Autism

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-26-16

At first glance, this audiobook may seem intimidating. The Audible version is just over 23 hours long. However, the subtitle, "The story of Autism" is quite correct because this is a narrative. It is engaging and interesting and tells the history of Autism in a story format, incorporating the stories of those who were involved. The Audible chapters are generally 20-40 minutes, meaning it can be taken in neat smaller chunks. For the most part, it can be listened to around children except for the chapter on FC where graphic sexual abuse allegations are made and the occasional cuss word from quotations elsewhere. The narrator has a pleasant voice and is easy to listen to.

The book begins with Donald Triplett, the first child diagnosed with Autism. It goes back into the past, to explore historical cases of possible Autism to explore the assertion that "Autism has always existed." It looks at the rise and fall of the "refrigerator mother," the movement to stop institutionalization, and the movement to get children with Autism the option to go to schools with "normal" children. It documents the timeline of researchers looking at the symptoms, causes, prevalence and biomedical issues concerning Autism, including the war on vaccines. It looks at the organizations who stepped up to spread awareness for the condition and helped to fund the first studies about it.

When scanning the reviews after starting the book, I saw several reviewers criticize the book for being about "the parents of children with Autism" and not more about the disabled people instead. I find it hard to believe that these people read the entire book. There are many individuals with Autism who are portrayed prominently in the book. There are also a lot of parents of children with Autism who are featured, but with good reason. The first reason is that most of the "high functioning people with Autism" who would be capable of arguing about the perception of Autism would not have even been considered Autistic when the diagnosis was originally conceived. And of those who were, a great majority were locked away institutions and would not have received an education to help them be able to be leaders in the Autism community. So, yes, a lot of parents are involved in the story of Autism because they were the ones who fought for change because their children were not able to speak for themselves. Only after parents pushed for education and services and non-institutionalization and after Asperger's Syndrome was added to the mix, did we see higher functioning people with Autism leading "normal" daily lives, getting careers and starting to speak for themselves. Toward the end of the book, there is a confrontation between a mother of a child with severe Autism (who has medical issues, seizures and gastrointestinal issues related to his Autism) and an activist who has high functioning Autism. The activist says that Autism does not need a cure, while the mother asserts that this normal-looking person with Autism who can talk and drive does not necessarily speak for her son who in his sickened condition, probably does not want to exist this way.

The book resounded with me, both as a mother of two daughters with Autism and as a licensed teacher in special education. I recommend it to anyone looking to learn more about Autism and for educators as well. It has a great balance between narrative story and technical details that will appeal to the general public and higher education alike.

8 of 9 people found this review helpful

Free: A Brief History of Holiday Music
    
    
        By:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        The Great Courses
    
    


    
    
        Narrated by:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Professor Robert Greenberg
    
    


    
    Length: 42 mins
    1,173 ratings
    Overall 3.7
  • Free: A Brief History of Holiday Music

  • By: The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Professor Robert Greenberg
  • Length: 42 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 1,173
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,056
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 1,048

Discover the fascinating journey of Christmas music through the centuries, led by world-renowned music historian Robert Greenberg. Christmas music has had an immensely rich history, heavily influenced by the church, cultural traditions like the Germanic Yuletide, and even drinking songs. Hear some of the first Christmas music ever composed and gain new insight into the beloved Christmas classics we still sing today.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Holiday Music Fun But Limited Scope

  • By Sara on 12-24-15

A Holiday Treat

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-10-15

Oh my.

Greenberg is an awesome lecturer. In this lecture, he covers Christmas music, starting at early chants and finishing with Bach's Christmas Oratorio, Handel's Messiab and Tchaikovsky's The Nutcracker with a brief interlude about the Carol.

You will laugh, be entertained and learn a lot.