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SamanthaG

Marietta GA
  • 115
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  • 308
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  • 308
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  • The Spaceship Next Door

  • By: Gene Doucette
  • Narrated by: Steve Carlson
  • Length: 11 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5,259
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,928
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4,931

When a spaceship landed in an open field in the quiet mill town of Sorrow Falls, Massachusetts, everyone realized humankind was not alone in the universe. With that realization everyone freaked out for a little while. Or almost everyone. The residents of Sorrow Falls took the news pretty well. This could have been due to a certain local quality of unflappability, or it could have been that in three years the ship did exactly nothing other than sit quietly in that field, and nobody understood the full extent of this nothing the ship was doing better than the people who lived right next door.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Another fun Sci Fi read with an Excellent Reader!

  • By bluestategirl on 12-30-16

Slow Going

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-09-18

The concept is interesting in the beginning - a spaceship lands in a small town in New England...and does nothing for a long time, a very long time. Nothing much else happens, either. The narrator’s voice is very soothing - too much so to hold my interest. My mind kept wandering and

  • Leaving Time

  • By: Jodi Picoult
  • Narrated by: Rebecca Lowman, Abigail Revasch, Kathe Mazur, and others
  • Length: 15 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,159
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,986
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,979

Refusing to believe that she would be abandoned as a young child, Jenna searches for her mother regularly online and pores over the pages of Alice's old journals. A scientist who studied grief among elephants, Alice wrote mostly of her research among the animals she loved, yet Jenna hopes the entries will provide a clue to her mother’s whereabouts. Desperate to find the truth, Jenna enlists two unlikely allies in her quest.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Pickiest Reader Would Be Willing to Give 6 Stars

  • By Jan on 10-18-14

Poorly Constructed Storyline

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-21-18

This kind of book (can't say much more without spoiling) needs to be well-constructed and succinct; this was neither. There's way too much of Alice and elephants. I learned a lot about elephants from this book, but much of it was repetitive - like how much better at "mothering" (and many other things as well) they are than humans. Alice agonizes - over and over - about her mistakes, and yes, she is a hard-to-love character, even for herself. Was I surprised at the ending? Yes, but not in a good way.
My favorite character was Serenity; second favorite - Virgil. They are both well-drawn and their actions are consistent with their characterizations.
The narration was pretty good and I liked the fact that there were male and female narrators to handle the different voices.

  • The Woman in the Window

  • A Novel
  • By: A. J. Finn
  • Narrated by: Ann Marie Lee
  • Length: 13 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 17,070
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 15,693
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 15,643

Anna Fox lives alone - a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times...and spying on her neighbors. Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, mother, their teenaged son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn't, her world begins to crumble. And its shocking secrets are laid bare.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • STAY AWAY!!!

  • By Susan Olson on 06-02-18

I'll bet Mr. Mallory is sorry he used a pseudonym

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-13-18

Woman in the Window is the definition of a "page-turner," "unputdownable," and "drive around in your car wasting gas just to keep listening" book. It contains lots of surprises that make perfect sense but are not telegraphed in advance.
Anna suffers (literally suffers) from agoraphobia, which I'd always known about, but with no understanding of all it entailed. I knew it was a fear of being outside, or "in the marketplace" as I'd heard it described. I did not understand how it really afflicted those suffering from it. Finn/Mallory's depiction of Anna's bouts of it if she did venture outside gave me an understanding of agoraphobia that I'd never considered. I won't say more for fear of spoiling, but what a well-written and well-constructed book!

  • The Testament of Mary

  • By: Colm Toibin
  • Narrated by: Meryl Streep
  • Length: 3 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,510
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,389
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,376

Meryl Streep’s performance of Colm Tóibín's acclaimed portrait of Mary is hailed by the New York Times Book Review as “an ideal audiobook,” presenting the three-time Academy Award-winner in “yet another great role.” Shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, Colm Tóibín's The Testament of Mary presents Mary as a solitary older woman still seeking to understand the events that become the narrative of the New Testament and the foundation of Christianity. In the ancient town of Ephesus, Mary lives alone, years after her son's crucifixion. She has no interest in collaborating with the authors of the Gospel. They are her keepers, providing her with food and shelter and visiting her regularly. She does not agree that her son is the Son of God; nor that his death was "worth it"; nor that the "group of misfits he gathered around him, men who could not look a woman in the eye," were holy disciples. This woman who we know from centuries of paintings and scripture as the docile, loving, silent, long-suffering, obedient, worshipful mother of Christ becomes a tragic heroine with the relentless eloquence of Electra or Medea or Antigone, in a portrait so vivid and convincing that our image of Mary will be forever transformed.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • from a non believer...

  • By Taormina60 on 09-27-13

Mary depicted as a human woman of her time

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-01-18

I dont know what the basis of this story was - the apocryphal testament of Mary, or what? It does succeed in humanizing her, eg, what would someone in her position have thought about the unexplainable happenings concerning her son’s crucifixion and subsequent resurrection. These were obviously things she neither expected nor understood in the moment.
Her reaction to her caretakers (John?) was realistic. She viewed them as interlopers and basically just men...who messed things up in her house. And though they tried to explain to her what had happened to her son and who her son actually was, in a theological sense, she could not grasp what they were saying. She loves him the way a mother loves a son, especially one who is lost to her, but loves and misses her dead husband and his place in her life even more.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Something in the Water

  • By: Catherine Steadman
  • Narrated by: Catherine Steadman
  • Length: 11 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,966
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23,163
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23,074

Erin is a documentary filmmaker on the brink of a professional breakthrough, Mark a handsome investment banker with big plans. Passionately in love, they embark on a dream honeymoon to the tropical island of Bora Bora, where they enjoy the sun, the sand, and each other. Then, while scuba diving in the crystal blue sea, they find something in the water....

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Give this a HARD PASS

  • By 3dewdrops on 06-27-18

Spine-tingly Good!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-01-18

Fantastic book - the kind that I waste gas on, just driving around the block or sitting in a parking lot with the engine running. The plot has lots of twists and turns, which are believable but impossible to anticipate.
My only complaint is that the author/narrator has a heavy British accent (for me), but once I slowed the narration down to 75%, It was great. I guess this made the listening experience longer, but that was OK with me since I didn't want the book to end anyway!

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Wait, What?

  • And Life's Other Essential Questions
  • By: James E. Ryan
  • Narrated by: James E. Ryan
  • Length: 2 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,575
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,427
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,424

In his commencement address to the graduating class of 2016, James E. Ryan, dean of the Harvard University Graduate School of Education, offered remarkable advice to the crowd of hopeful men and women eager to make their marks on the world. The key to achieving emotional connections and social progress, he told them, can be found in five essential questions.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • This Author and Book Rambles On and On and On ...

  • By J Littlejohn on 06-23-18

Most of this we knew but didn't know we knew.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-05-18

Lots of stuff we already realized (but maybe not consciously) was part of "speech"... tonal differences, word emphasis, eye-rolls, eyebrow raises, hand gestures, etc. After all, we have to punctuate the spoken word, just as we do the written word.
An interesting listen and read pleasantly by the author.

  • Lincoln in the Bardo

  • A Novel
  • By: George Saunders
  • Narrated by: Nick Offerman, David Sedaris, George Saunders, and others
  • Length: 7 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 6,961
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,532
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 6,499

The long-awaited first novel from the author of Tenth of December: a moving and original father-son story featuring none other than Abraham Lincoln, as well as an unforgettable cast of supporting characters, living and dead, historical and invented. February 1862. The Civil War is less than one year old. The fighting has begun in earnest, and the nation has begun to realize it is in for a long, bloody struggle. Meanwhile, President Lincoln's beloved eleven-year-old son, Willie, lies upstairs in the White House, gravely ill.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • A Mixed Bag

  • By Thomas More on 02-24-17

Not Good for Listening

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-01-18

The "op-cits" and the dialog of the folks (?) in the cemetery were incredibly bothersome. I'm sure there are legal reasons for the op-cit usage, but it made the book almost un-listenable. I did make my way to the end, but I can't say that I enjoyed it or was moved by it or thought it was a great piece of literature - as so many critics did.
The cemetery people speaking were not identified until the end of their speeches and it was difficult to figure who was saying what to whom. They interrupted each other unmercifully which made it more difficult to identify the characters. The cemetery residents have been likened to the chorus in a Greek drama - but I wasn't looking for one of those.
I have bought the e-book version of this and find it so much better. I know who's speaking and can ignore the op-cits. It comes across as much more tender and heart-rending.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • American Wolf

  • A True Story of Survival and Obsession in the West
  • By: Nate Blakeslee
  • Narrated by: Mark Bramhall, Nate Blakeslee
  • Length: 9 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,461
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,360
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,351

Before men ruled the earth, there were wolves. Once abundant in North America, these majestic creatures were hunted to near extinction in the lower 48 states by the 1920s. But in recent decades, conservationists have brought wolves back to the Rockies, igniting a battle over the very soul of the West. With novelistic detail, Nate Blakeslee tells the gripping story of one of these wolves, O-Six, a charismatic alpha female named for the year of her birth.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An Epic American Story

  • By Michael - Audible Editor on 10-17-17

Avoiding Anthropomorphism at All Costs

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-26-17

Is there anything you would change about this book?

Yes - it's almost impossible to keep track of the characters whose names are numbers. Our heroine is only "06" and the rest of the characters are also numbers. 06 because she was born in 2006, but that rule isn't followed with most of the rest of the wolves' "namebers." I think this is an extreme example of avoiding anthropomorphism. Other than 06, the only one I could always remember was "Limpy," the only one with a name. We are finding that animals are more like us than we'd thought; they have emotions, "person"alities, intentions, varying degrees of intelligence and abilities, and, I would contend, souls. I think this is an effort to avoid interfering with wolves' natural behavior, but just watching them and recording their actions interferes with that very thing.


Would you ever listen to anything by Nate Blakeslee again?

Maybe. The quality of the writing was good, if somewhat academic.

Have you listened to any of Mark Bramhall and Nate Blakeslee ’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

No

Was American Wolf worth the listening time?

Yes, the information presented was worthwhile, especially the contention between those who favored the reintroduction of Wolves and those who wanted to see them eradicated.

  • Artemis

  • By: Andy Weir
  • Narrated by: Rosario Dawson
  • Length: 8 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 56,694
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52,882
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 52,735

Jazz Bashara is a criminal. Well, sort of. Life on Artemis, the first and only city on the moon, is tough if you're not a rich tourist or an eccentric billionaire. So smuggling in the occasional harmless bit of contraband barely counts, right? Not when you've got debts to pay and your job as a porter barely covers the rent. Everything changes when Jazz sees the chance to commit the perfect crime, with a reward too lucrative to turn down.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A ferrari with no motor

  • By will on 11-18-17

The Martian it Isn't!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-05-17

What did you like best about Artemis? What did you like least?

I love the technology especially in Andy Weir's writing. I assume he's writing "down" to his audience since we wouldn't probably have the knowledge of how to cope with space, the moon, a vacuum, but he seems to have researched the subject well and is able to convince us that "this is how it is."

Has Artemis turned you off from other books in this genre?

Well, no. What genre is it anyway? Yes, it's Sci-fi on the surface (no pun intended), but couldn't this story have taken place anywhere? (on the Earth, that is). I think that the Moon, or Mars, or any outer space venue isn't necessary to the story.

What does Rosario Dawson bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

I think she's a good narrator and able to project her character (young woman) quite convincingly..

Could you see Artemis being made into a movie or a TV series? Who should the stars be?

Maybe - I'm not sure if I'd go to see it or not. I see difficulties with the story-line, but the Moon setting would be a draw for viewers.

Any additional comments?

I was so taken with The Martian and Weir's writing that it would be difficult to appreciate another of his novels so much. When I finished The Martian, I made all of my friends read it and also made my book club read it. Everyone except the idiots loved it! I found myself reading late into the night, and even praying that Mark Watney would survive another pickle he found himself in. Then I would remember, "oh, he's fiction." But an author who can engender that kind of empathy is special!!
At the time, I looked for other books by Weir, but there weren't any, other thatn "The Egg," which isn't a book, but a 2 page meditation. I liked it, but, as I said, it isn't a book.

So, Andy, Thank you and I'm waiting. Hope you're working on something wonderful!

  • Norwegian Wood

  • By: Haruki Murakami
  • Narrated by: John Chancer
  • Length: 13 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 812
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 727
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 730

This stunning and elegiac novel by the author of the internationally acclaimed Wind-Up Bird Chronicle has sold over four million copies in Japan and is now available to American audiences for the first time. It is sure to be a literary event.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Beautiful, Wistful...

  • By Douglas on 02-18-16

A Long Meditation on Misery, Death and Sex

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-18-17

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

Yes because I'm a huge Murakami fan and his writing is amazing, even in translation; no because it's about unhappy people who have a lot of sex (in great detail) of all kinds, most of whom are miserable and die young. As far as I'm concerned, the story went nowhere. Plot...what plot?

Would you ever listen to anything by Haruki Murakami again?

Yes, absolutely! This was my 4th of his books and the one I've liked least. So glad I didn't read it first. My favorite is Hardboiled Wonderland & The End of the World.

Which scene was your favorite?

They were all so similar, I did not have a favorite.

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

No way! Too depressing.

Any additional comments?

The narrator was great! I loved his delivery and the way he believably voiced women. They sounded like women and did not all sound alike.