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Jay Friedman

Dallas, TX United States
  • 25
  • reviews
  • 192
  • helpful votes
  • 116
  • ratings
  • Magicians of the Gods

  • The Forgotten Wisdom of Earth’s Lost Civilization
  • By: Graham Hancock
  • Narrated by: Graham Hancock
  • Length: 14 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,832
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,583
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,584

The evidence revealed in this book shows beyond reasonable doubt that an advanced civilization that flourished during the Ice Age was destroyed in the global cataclysms between 12,800 and 11,600 years ago. But there were survivors - known to later cultures by names such as "the Sages", "the Magicians", "the Shining Ones", and "the Mystery Teachers of Heaven".

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The wait was worth it!

  • By Kindle Customer on 11-10-15

Every minute detail, if that interests you

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-02-17

The concept here is really amazing. The fact that there may have been an advanced civilization 10,000-12,000 years ago is fascinating. Tell me that story.

But it wasn't really told like a story. This book followed an archaeological path and went into the most minute details, spending 30 minutes at a time talking about the earth's erosion due to a river or something similar.

In the end, I couldn't get through it, which is too bad because I would have liked to learn more.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • My Turn: The Autobiography

  • By: Johan Cruyff
  • Narrated by: William Brand
  • Length: 9 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 124
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 112
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 113

Johan Cruyff is widely regarded as one of the greatest players in football history. Throughout his playing career, he was synonymous with Total Football, a style of play in which every player could play in any position on the pitch. Today his philosophy lives on in teams across Europe, from Barcelona to Bayern Munich, and players from Lionel Messi to Cesc Fabrecas.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Cruyff addresses his critics

  • By Jay Friedman on 01-02-17

Cruyff addresses his critics

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-02-17

This is not a bad book. I know that 3 stars can mean the death of a book here, but I don't regret listening to it. But this is because I'm an avid football and Barca fan and enjoyed learning about how things came about in the things that I love. If you're not predisposed to Ajax, Barca, or the concept of total football, I would not recommend.

Mostly this is because 50% of the book seems as though Cruyff has saved every piece of reportage that criticized him in his career and now goes through one by one and counters what they had to say. He is constantly addressing his critics and criticisms made of him long ago. Cruyff is a legend regardless of your opinion of him. One of the games greatest and one of those who had the most influence. I thought he could have told his side without being defensive.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Red Bandanna

  • A Life. A Choice. A Legacy.
  • By: Tom Rinaldi
  • Narrated by: Tom Rinaldi
  • Length: 6 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 174
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 163
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 163

When the Twin Towers fell on 9/11, Welles Crowther's parents had no idea what happened to him. In the unbearable days that followed, they came to accept that he would never come home. But the mystery of his final hours persisted. Eight months after the attacks, however, Welles' mother read a news account from several survivors, who said they and others had been led to safety by a stranger carrying a woman on his back down nearly 20 flights of stairs.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • 700 minutes too long

  • By Jay Friedman on 01-02-17

700 minutes too long

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-02-17

Tom Rinaldi is of ESPN fame and regularly creates gripping, outstanding 30 and 60 minute segments on topics that go beyond the sports field. Tom tells an interesting story here of Wells Krauther (sp?) that would have been awesome if told in 30-60 minutes. Instead, Tom takes a 30-60 minute idea and realizes a book of that length won't sell, and thus stretches it to 6.5 hours - still pretty short for a book.

If you can find a summary of this book, it's likely worth reading. The 60 minute vision would have me highly interested the whole time. The 750 minute version was tedious.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Auctions

  • The MIT Press Essential Knowledge Series
  • By: Timothy P. Hubbard, Harry J. Paarsch
  • Narrated by: Sean Pratt
  • Length: 5 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5

Although it is among the oldest of market institutions, the auction is ubiquitous in today's economy, used for everything from government procurement to selling advertising on the Internet to course assignment at MIT's Sloan School. Yet beyond the small number of economists who specialize in the subject, few people understand how auctions really work. This concise, accessible, and engaging book explains both the theory and the practice of auctions.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theoretical Review of Auctions

  • By Jack Graham on 08-03-18

Perfect length and amount of information.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-22-16

This gave a great overview of all of the basics that went deep enough to understand all of the variables and idiosyncrasies without getting so deep or mathy that I would get lost. Especially in audio format.

  • The Inevitable

  • Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future
  • By: Kevin Kelly
  • Narrated by: George Newbern
  • Length: 11 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,724
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,246
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,235

Much of what will happen in the next 30 years is inevitable, driven by technological trends that are already in motion. In this fascinating, provocative new book, Kevin Kelly provides an optimistic road map for the future, showing how the coming changes in our lives - from virtual reality in the home to an on-demand economy to artificial intelligence embedded in everything we manufacture - can be understood as the result of a few long-term accelerating forces.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Predicting is hard, especially about the future

  • By Michael on 02-20-17

Starts amazing, then gets very recycled

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-07-16

Applying the 2nd law of thermodynamics to technology and the world around us? Wow, cool. The first 2-3 chapters were great. Really zoomed out thinking that helped expand my view of machine learning and seeing what is possible. Then it goes into repeating the same things we've read about on business insider, wired, and other pubs forever. the sharing economy, the surveiled world, remixing. For what I got out of the first few chapters it was actually worth the credit. Just wish I would have known to stop listening at that point.

  • Countdown to Zero Day

  • Stuxnet and the Launch of the World's First Digital Weapon
  • By: Kim Zetter
  • Narrated by: Joe Ochman
  • Length: 13 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,337
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,196
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,194

Top cybersecurity journalist Kim Zetter tells the story behind the virus that sabotaged Iran’s nuclear efforts and shows how its existence has ushered in a new age of warfare - one in which a digital attack can have the same destructive capability as a megaton bomb.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting Story, Terrible Production Quality

  • By Baumerx20 on 05-02-15

7 hours too long; otherwise good

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-06-16

Very interesting story and had the potential to be suspenseful, interesting, and informing. It was interesting - at time. It was informing - at times. But it tried too hard to provide that style of writing that gives the full background around a situation and resulted in a book that was way longer than it needed to be and let my mind wander at times.

  • How We Got to Now

  • Six Innovations That Made the Modern World
  • By: Steven Johnson
  • Narrated by: George Newbern
  • Length: 6 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,318
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,150
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,143

In this volume, Steven Johnson explores the history of innovation over centuries, tracing facets of modern life (refrigeration, clocks, and eyeglass lenses, to name a few) from their creation by hobbyists, amateurs, and entrepreneurs to their unintended historical consequences. Filled with surprising stories of accidental genius and brilliant mistakes - from the French publisher who invented the phonograph before Edison but forgot to include playback, to the Hollywood movie star who helped invent the technology behind Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Really good and interesting book

  • By CJFLA on 10-29-14

Amazing, but 25% shorter than I'd like

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-26-15

Outstanding overview of common materials and measures that we take for granted, how they came into importance, and the unintended consequences of each. I thoroughly enjoyed every bit of this book. I highly recommend it, even though it's perhaps a bit short. I feel like the author should have taken the time to write on two more topics to make this a full length, more complete book.

  • The Righteous Mind

  • Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion
  • By: Jonathan Haidt
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Haidt
  • Length: 11 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,736
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,082
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,014

In The Righteous Mind, social psychologist Jonathan Haidt explores the origins of our divisions and points the way forward to mutual understanding. His starting point is moral intuition - the nearly instantaneous perceptions we all have about other people and the things they do. These intuitions feel like self-evident truths, making us righteously certain that those who see things differently are wrong. Haidt shows us how these intuitions differ across cultures, including the cultures of the political left and right.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Required reading... with one caveat.

  • By Amazon Customer on 07-14-13

Six stars, if i could

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-15-15

While this book has great applications in our cultural discussions of religion and politics, I immediately took much of this and applied it to how I run my company. Not the religion and politics part, but understanding the true root of what causes fundamental workplace disagreements and helping people work backwards to find common ground and then build back up.

As for the religion and politics side, I can say I finally understand where people are coming from in other cultures and "how they get there", to views/decisions/practices I used to think of as absurd and indescribable. Anyone with a sliver of an open mind will get a ton out of this book.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Almost Nearly Perfect People

  • Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia
  • By: Michael Booth
  • Narrated by: Ralph Lister
  • Length: 13 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 391
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 351
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 342

Journalist Michael Booth has lived among the Scandinavians for more than 10 years, and he has grown increasingly frustrated with the rose-tinted view of this part of the world offered up by the Western media. In this timely audiobook, he leaves his adopted home of Denmark and embarks on a journey through all five of the Nordic countries to discover who these curious tribes are, the secrets of their success, and, most intriguing of all, what they think of one another.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing! Anthropological, historical, entertaining

  • By Jay Friedman on 09-30-15

Amazing! Anthropological, historical, entertaining

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-30-15

This is a deep dive into the Nordic/Scandinavian societies of Finland, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and Iceland. It goes through each country, compares, contrasts, and is all written by a cynical Brit who is surprised to hear that these countries are consistently ranked among the happiest in the world.

It weaves in enough data and information to be meaningful, but keeps it in the form of a story enough that you're entertained.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • Misbehaving

  • The Making of Behavioral Economics
  • By: Richard Thaler
  • Narrated by: L. J. Ganser
  • Length: 13 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,143
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,620
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,584

Richard H. Thaler has spent his career studying the radical notion that the central agents in the economy are humans - predictable, error-prone individuals. Misbehaving is his arresting, frequently hilarious account of the struggle to bring an academic discipline back down to earth - and change the way we think about economics, ourselves, and our world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I'm a lot smarter than I was before

  • By Barrie Bramley on 10-04-15

Great book if it's your first about Behav. Econ

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-30-15

This might be slightly unfair, but I couldn't get into this book because I've essentially heard/read all this before. If you're familiar with the Freakonomics series, Influence, or any of the many other B.E. books, you simply won't find anything new in here. On the other hand, if you're brand new to B.E., this would be a really great starter book. However, as comprehensive as it is, it's nowhere near as entertaining as the Freakonomics series or Influence. I even liked "secrets of the money lab" better.

150 of 160 people found this review helpful