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  • 3
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  • 31
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  • The Paleo Manifesto

  • Ancient Wisdom for Lifelong Health
  • By: John Durant
  • Narrated by: John Durant
  • Length: 11 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 110
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 93
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 94

In The Paleo Manifesto: Ancient Wisdom for Lifelong Health, John Durant argues for an evolutionary - and revolutionary - approach to health. All animals, human or otherwise, thrive when they mimic key elements of life in their natural habitat. From diet to movement to sleep, this evolutionary perspective sheds light on some of our most pressing health concerns. What is causing the rise of chronic conditions, such as obesity, diabetes, and depression?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good Info Well Presented

  • By thomas on 01-06-17

Paleo Manifesto - Or: Paleo Propaganda

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-03-18

Wow, where to begin with this book.

First off, let me defend myself. I have been eating “Paleo” for 2 years now, my exercises are a combination of what my physical therapist recommends, and what I believe a hunter gatherer should have been able to do (pushups, pullups, situps, and running, and exercises that strengthen those muscles). I wholeheartedly agree with the paleolithic lifestyle philosophy, and I was kind of hoping this book would be a compilation of various paleo lifestyle suggestions – and it was.

However the longer I listened to this, it went from 5 stars… to 4 stars… to 3 stars…
An immediate docking of one star would be John Durant’s performance. Riddled with mispronunciations, sometimes forgivable, the one moment where I actually had to pause the book and look it up to see where in the world he got his pronounciation: John Durant pronounces Midwifery the same way they would have a few hundred years ago and in a few pockets of Europe. Did he really not know how to pronounce this word and had to go grab some high-on-the-shelf dictionary to find out how ‘wife’ is pronounced?

But that’s a tangent. The most egregious part of this audiobook was the slow devolution of intellectual argument presented in this book. The book starts off strong when talking about diet and history, but you can almost feel John Durant getting more desperate and less intelligent as each chapter comes up. Toward the end of the book I was only listening to hear how he defended his arguments (many of which I agreed with), with cherry picked data and anecdotes. The chapters on hunting and melanoma (“Sorry Redheads – you’re carcinogenic!”) were especially bone-headed. There goes another star or two.

I could spend another paragraph discussing the chapter where he starts talking about crossfit. My initial reaction was “Oh boy, here we go”… and then I ate my words as he presented a reasonable defense of crossfit, only to jump headlong into the cultlike behavior of crossfitters where he bashes all other forms of exercise (Dance and Yoga are for low-testosterone males who otherwise couldn’t find a mate, according to John Durant), and defends crossfit’s most obvious drawback: The high rate of injury – as a side effect of creating exercise that’s so fun it pushes a few individuals into working out too hard.
On that note, I’d like to point out that the high rate of injury among crossfitters is so high, that in some online communities, the actual discussion of an injury is banned. How do you know you might be in a cult-like fitness club? When raising concerns can actually get you thrown out of a community.

To summarize, if you were expecting a book full of logical, well researched, unbiased, and balanced arguments about the paleo lifestyle, you sure won’t find it in this manifesto. This book is nothing more than paleo propaganda.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Why Buddhism Is True

  • The Science and Philosophy of Enlightenment
  • By: Robert Wright
  • Narrated by: Fred Sanders
  • Length: 10 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,109
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,776
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,744

From one of America's greatest minds, a journey through psychology, philosophy, and lots of meditation to show how Buddhism holds the key to moral clarity and enduring happiness. In Why Buddhism Is True, Wright leads listeners on a journey through psychology, philosophy, and a great many silent retreats to show how and why meditation can serve as the foundation for a spiritual life in a secular age.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • More than a beginner's guide...

  • By Rugger Burke on 09-12-17

A Biological Approach to Buddhism

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-16-18

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Absolutely. This approached Buddhism from a scientific point of view, dismissing a lot of the metaphysical aspects, and made it easy to digest for anyone of any religion.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Why Buddhism Is True?

There are a few places where he describes Buddhism as a fight against how our minds evolved, and I found that really appealing.

What does Fred Sanders bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

No idea.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

-The Documentary Film?

  • The Fifth Season

  • The Broken Earth, Book 1
  • By: N. K. Jemisin
  • Narrated by: Robin Miles
  • Length: 15 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,326
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,578
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,550

This is the way the world ends. For the last time. A season of endings has begun. It starts with the great, red rift across the heart of the world's sole continent, spewing ash that blots out the sun. It starts with death, with a murdered son and a missing daughter. It starts with betrayal and long-dormant wounds rising up to fester. This is the Stillness, a land long familiar with catastrophe, where the power of the Earth is wielded as a weapon. And where there is no mercy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • ORIGINAL AND MOVING, EXCELLENT!

  • By Fantasy on 12-01-15

Earthshakingly Weird Fantasy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-16-18

Would you consider the audio edition of The Fifth Season to be better than the print version?

I never read the print version.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Tonkee was pretty neat. Initially they seemed kind of gross, but the more her character was around, the more I wanted to learn about them. I was kind of disappointed that they ended up being a somewhat minor character.

Which character – as performed by Robin Miles – was your favorite?

Robin gave Schaffa a sort of alien Scottish accent and played off the confident creepy grandfatherly aura pretty well.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Toward the end it was. It took awhile for the story to get going, but about midway through I was hooked.

Any additional comments?

What an ending!

  • The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

  • A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life
  • By: Mark Manson
  • Narrated by: Roger Wayne
  • Length: 5 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 96,573
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 84,718
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 84,240

For decades we've been told that positive thinking is the key to a happy, rich life. "F*ck positivity," Mark Manson says. "Let's be honest, shit is f*cked, and we have to live with it." In his wildly popular Internet blog, Manson doesn't sugarcoat or equivocate. He tells it like it is - a dose of raw, refreshing, honest truth that is sorely lacking today. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck is his antidote to the coddling, let's-all-feel-good mind-set that has infected modern society and spoiled a generation, rewarding them with gold medals just for showing up.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • A book for 20-somethings, but not me

  • By Bonny on 09-22-16

Excellent Performance - Okay Book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-16-18

Where does The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

When it comes to self-help, it's far from the worst book I've read, but I felt like it relied too heavily on humor to make its points.

How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

During the first chapter the irreverent humor and frequent swearing is funny and refreshing. After that though, it started to feel like I was listening to blog posts being read aloud.

What about Roger Wayne’s performance did you like?

Roger Wayne was so into the story he was reading, I actually had to stop and see if this book was read by the author. Definitely far from monotone. I'd love to listen to more books read by this enthusiastic guy.

What insight do you think you’ll apply from The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck?

Learning to tell the difference between Not-Giving-a-F*ck, and determining what is important to Give-a-F*ck-About

Any additional comments?

There were a lot of Buddhist themes in this book, but much closer to Stoic philosophy, heavily laced with humor.

  • Fire and Fury

  • Inside the Trump White House
  • By: Michael Wolff
  • Narrated by: Michael Wolff, Holter Graham
  • Length: 11 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,769
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,611
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,511

With extraordinary access to the West Wing, Michael Wolff reveals what happened behind-the-scenes in the first nine months of the most controversial presidency of our time in Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House. Since Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th President of the United States, the country—and the world—has witnessed a stormy, outrageous, and absolutely mesmerizing presidential term that reflects the volatility and fierceness of the man elected Commander-in-Chief.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not as credible as one would like.

  • By Jerry R. Nokes Jr. on 01-29-18

Read the book that will inspire the movie

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-06-18

This book is both tragic and hilarious. There were times I had to put it down with rage, and times I listened a little longer because it was making me laugh. If even a single chapter of this book is true, Trump is mentally unfit and Bannon is a malevolent force of nature.

  • Words of Radiance

  • The Stormlight Archive, Book 2
  • By: Brandon Sanderson
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer, Kate Reading
  • Length: 48 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 45,008
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 42,102
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 42,086

In that first volume, we were introduced to the remarkable world of Roshar, a world both alien and magical, where gigantic hurricane-like storms scour the surface every few days and life has adapted accordingly. Roshar is shared by humans and the enigmatic, humanoid Parshendi, with whom they are at war.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Book !!; no let down- "Words of Radiance" shines

  • By Don Gilbert on 03-08-14

This series is going to take you by storm

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-07-18

What did you love best about Words of Radiance?

Brandon Sanderson is creating his own Lord of the Rings. His own Harry Potter. This is a fantasy universe that feels vast. I like that there are intermissions from the main story where there are little short stories taking place somewhere else on the planet. It really feels like a huge world, and leaves you wondering what is going on everywhere else.

What did you like best about this story?

This is basically the same question as before. So what can I say, it really feels like Brandon Sanderson is creating his own Lord of the Rings. His own Harry Potter. This is a fantasy universe that feels vast. I like that there are intermissions from the main story where there are little short stories taking place somewhere else on the planet. It really feels like a huge world, and leaves you wondering what is going on everywhere else.

Which scene was your favorite?

Wow, spoilers! The climactic battle at the end was great.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

There were times I just had to take a break because a scene was so intense, I just needed to catch my breath and get over what just happened.

  • I Don't Want to Talk About It

  • Overcoming the Secret Legacy of Male Depression
  • By: Terrence Real
  • Narrated by: Adam Verner
  • Length: 12 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 241
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 200
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 198

Psychotherapist Terrence Real offers an important and compelling look at the silent epidemic of depression among men and shows, with compassion and clarity, what can be done to break this vicious cycle.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Good to listen to but be careful!

  • By R. Keith Clingan on 02-02-17

Nothing groundbreaking

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-07-18

What disappointed you about I Don't Want to Talk About It?

Terrence Real seems convinced that depression in men stems from problems with their fathers. Haven't we moved beyond Freud?

Has I Don't Want to Talk About It turned you off from other books in this genre?

Yes

What about Adam Verner’s performance did you like?

It wasn't his fault that he was reading outdated theories.

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

I realized that I couldn't combat depression with a book.

Any additional comments?

Terrence Real's theories are old and incorrect. I feel like he was focused on relating all of his anecdotes to people's problems with their parents. While this may be true in some cases, it's certainly not all, and it's definitely an outdated way of looking at it.

  • Traction

  • Get a Grip on Your Business
  • By: Gino Wickman
  • Narrated by: Kevin Pierce
  • Length: 6 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,234
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,902
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,865

Do you have a grip on your business, or does your business have a grip on you? All entrepreneurs and business leaders face similar frustrations: personnel conflict, profit woes, and inadequate growth. Decisions never seem to get made, or once made, fail to be properly implemented. But there is a solution. It’s not complicated or theoretical.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • awesome system for running a business

  • By Amazon Customer on 09-29-17

Great business advice

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-07-18

What made the experience of listening to Traction the most enjoyable?

I listened to this while the startup I was working for was going through some hard times. The more I listened to it, the more I realized we were on the wrong path. When attorneys spoke to employees about their ideas on how to fix the company, I felt like I was prepared to make a good case for some change.

What did you like best about this story?

I got what I wanted out of this book and don't feel a need to read more - however if I find myself working for another startup company, it might be time to read it again.

Which character – as performed by Kevin Pierce – was your favorite?

Lots of examples and anecdotes. Without it, this would have been a very boring book, but the plentiful real-life examples made it easy to listen to.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Nothing

Any additional comments?

It makes a good point that company mantras might feel cheesy, but they are needed. If you're going through a list of ideals you want your employees to follow, you will soon realize what you want in a person that you hire - and you will realize the employees you have that don't follow your standards.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • His Majesty's Dragon

  • Temeraire, Book 1
  • By: Naomi Novik
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 10 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,460
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,693
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,696

When HMS Reliant captures a French frigate and seizes its precious cargo - an unhatched dragon egg - fate sweeps Captain Will Laurence from his seafaring life into an uncertain future and an unexpected kinship with a most extraordinary creature. Thrust into the rarified world of the Aerial Corps as master of the dragon Temeraire, he will face a crash course in the daring tactics of airborne battle.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent AU period fantasy

  • By Melanie on 07-08-10

Lots of fun for fans of dragons

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-08-17

Where does His Majesty's Dragon rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

This was audiobook junk food. Ranks pretty low, but that doesn't mean it wasn't a fun book to listen to. It's a bit like "Master and Commander" meets "How to Train your Dragon" lots of Navy and Military jargon, with talking dragons that range from goofy to regal. You won't find philosophical discussion or educational monologue in this. Just dragons and soldiers.

If you’ve listened to books by Naomi Novik before, how does this one compare?

Haven't heard any others.

Which character – as performed by Simon Vance – was your favorite?

Temeraire himself. Something about the way Simon Vance voiced him, I was imagining an almost cat-like appearance to the dragon. An air of confident curiosity oozed from Temeraire that none of the other characters had.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

"Master and Commander - with dragons."

Any additional comments?

I was actually surprised with how much 'science' there actually was put into the dragons. Early on I expected it to just be a fantasy element to the story, but they went through efforts to explain the genetics of the dragons, the hollow bones, the gas bladders, and the breeding programs. I was surprised that the human 'riders' also had to follow breeding programs so the much longer lived dragons wouldn't reject their riders' children.

  • Seveneves

  • A Novel
  • By: Neal Stephenson
  • Narrated by: Mary Robinette Kowal, Will Damron
  • Length: 31 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 16,379
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,216
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 15,209

A catastrophic event renders the earth a ticking time bomb. In a feverish race against the inevitable, nations around the globe band together to devise an ambitious plan to ensure the survival of humanity far beyond our atmosphere, in outer space.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • So Much Potential

  • By Kurt Schwoppe on 06-08-17

Shockingly Depressive, Incredibly Interesting

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-08-17

Would you consider the audio edition of Seveneves to be better than the print version?

I might be an outlier in that I thought Mary Kowal was a good choice. Yes, her male voices are terrible and her accents are cringey, but this isn't a book about a bunch of men, and there aren't many scenes with accents. Overall, she did a great job of giving each woman a unique voice, from nerdy to snobby, high pitched teenager and low pitched matrons. You wouldn't experience that in print.

The choice to switch narrators at the 'time leap' was an interesting one because it feels almost like a completely different book. Will Damron does a much better job on pronouncing words right, but has a much lower range of voices. You win some, you lose some.

What did you like best about this story?

Many parts of this book reminded me of "The Martian". Problems and disasters crop up, with well explained ways for an engineer to fix it. Time after time something terrible happens, and someone goes into a long monologue about how they can fix it. It's very educational about a LOT of subjects.

Which scene was your favorite?

Just about any scene with Dinah I enjoyed. I always looked forward to finding out what she was up to while Doc Dubois was off rambling about hating politics or something. I am glad she didn't stick with Reese. I'm not sure I could have handled that posh accent for long.

Above all though, the last part of the book with the aftermath of "The Epic" was my favorite. A good payoff to the depressing story.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

It gave me a lot of anxiety and depression. The build up of impending doom, and then afterward an extremely frustrating realization of how incredibly flawed humanity is. Disaster after disaster, I started wondering if any of my favorite characters were going to survive.

Any additional comments?

It's worth putting up with the annoying accents. Most of the time the narrator isn't bad. I've certainly heard worse.