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Colorado Springs
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  • 419
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  • The Cold Dish

  • A Walt Longmire Mystery
  • By: Craig Johnson
  • Narrated by: George Guidall
  • Length: 13 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,101
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,597
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,573

Introducing Wyoming's Sheriff Walt Longmire in this riveting novel from the New York Times best-selling author of Dry Bones, the first in the Longmire series, the basis for the hit Netflix original series Longmire. Johnson draws on his deep attachment to the American West to produce a literary mystery of stunning authenticity, full of memorable characters.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not Your Ordinary Western Novel (Series)

  • By Dataman on 09-12-12

George Guidall is a perfect Longmire.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-14-18

Although I watched the TV show (and loved it!) I had not yet read any of the series. And I had purchased the first two on Audible a long time ago where they have lingered, unread. So today was the day.

The book was highly enjoyable with all my favorites from the TV show present and just as likable. Wyoming in its harsh vastness is front and center. The people represent the rural west of the USA quite well and are therefore very familiar to me (I am from a rural mountain town in Colorado). Mr Johnson created a setting that is so real it feels a bit like another character in the story and I love that.

  • Girls & Boys

  • By: Dennis Kelly
  • Narrated by: Carey Mulligan
  • Length: 1 hr and 46 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,493
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,307
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,289

A pulse-pounding new play from Tony Award-winning® playwright Dennis Kelly takes you on a journey that is at once hilarious, gripping, and heartbreaking. This world-premiere production starring Carey Mulligan (The Great Gatsby, An Education) is available exclusively on Audible after a celebrated run at the Royal Court Theatre in London and off-Broadway at the Minetta Lane Theatre. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I have never heard a story performed so well.

  • By Erin Reeve on 07-05-18

the story and her performance combined to wreck me

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-14-18

Wow! This play was stunning, shocking, sad and unforgettable. Carey Mulligan was riveting. I loved the quiet way she handled the material. I love the little moments in which Kelly had the woman break the fourth wall and speak directly to the audience. And that little warning where she reminds me that what I was afraid was coming is actually coming, but also provides the trigger warning and then says to me that I need to remember it isn't happening to me and isn't happening now... that moment devastated me. In fact, after the lengthy discussion of the most horrific part of the story that she warned me about, I hit rewind and went back to hear the warning again. It was beautiful and powerful.

This story, and all its lessons, will linger with me for a long time to come. And I will seek out anything done by Carey Mulligan from now on. She was brilliant.

  • The Disappeared

  • By: C. J. Box
  • Narrated by: David Chandler
  • Length: 11 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,572
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,435
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,432

Wyoming's new governor isn't sure what to make of Joe Pickett, but he has a job for him that is extremely delicate. A prominent female British executive never came home from the high-end guest ranch she was visiting, and the British Embassy is pressing hard. Pickett knows that happens sometimes - these ranches are stocked with handsome young cowboys, and "ranch romances" aren't uncommon. But no sign of her months after she vanished? That suggests something else.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Sheridan takes a lover!

  • By Richard Delman on 04-11-18

Chandler is perfect as Pickett.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-14-18

I always enjoy Box's Pickett series... especially when Nate is front and center. I love how well Box creates the sense of place. I live in a small town, in rural county in the mountains of Colorado. Box's Wyoming setting is so similar to life here and the characters are so real for the place. When I read a series I want to have a familiar place, smart and likable, but flawed, characters, and stories that are driven by those characters. In this series I want Nate. And Joe's family. The books in which those characters are missing are much less enjoyable, so I was so glad to have both Nate and Sheridan play big roles in this one.

I do have one big complaint: cliffhanger! Ugh. I hate them. I hate waiting a year or two to know the outcome. I almost always need to reread the first part. If I had known, I would have just waited to read this one when the next one was published.

  • The Song of Achilles

  • A Novel
  • By: Madeline Miller
  • Narrated by: Frazer Douglas
  • Length: 11 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,543
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,230
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,217

Greece in the age of heroes. Patroclus, an awkward young prince, has been exiled to the kingdom of Phthia to be raised in the shadow of King Peleus and his golden son, Achilles. “The best of all the Greeks”—strong, beautiful, and the child of a goddess—Achilles is everything the shamed Patroclus is not. Yet despite their differences, the boys become steadfast companions. Their bond deepens as they grow into young men and become skilled in the arts of war and medicine—much to the displeasure and the fury of Achilles’ mother, Thetis, a cruel sea goddess with a hatred of mortals.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent story/narrator

  • By Delah on 07-09-12

A lovely introduction to the story of Achilles

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-09-18

I avoided this book for quite some time as I was convinced it wasn't for me ... too popular, and not a topic I generally like. I knew a bit of the story of Achilles but not a lot and had no knowledge of Patroclus. Ms Miller took their story and created a book with a modern feel, and gave us intriguing and real characters despite the constraints of the mythology. She encased it all in a lovely setting in the mountains of Greece, the scent of olive trees, mythical creatures who teach the lyre, archery practices and forbidden love. I enjoyed the book a lot and when I finished it, I went straight to Google to learn a bit more about the background story, which is when I found that Patroclus existed in the original stories. My husband was a classics major so I will pick his brain as soon as I can.

  • An American Marriage (Oprah’s Book Club)

  • A Novel
  • By: Tayari Jones
  • Narrated by: Sean Crisden, Eisa Davis
  • Length: 8 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,872
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,072
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,046

Newlyweds Celestial and Roy are the embodiment of both the American Dream and the New South. He is a young executive, and she is an artist on the brink of an exciting career. But as they settle into the routine of their life together, they are ripped apart by circumstances neither could have imagined. Roy is arrested and sentenced to 12 years for a crime Celestial knows he didn't commit. Though fiercely independent, Celestial finds herself bereft and unmoored, taking comfort in Andre, her childhood friend, and best man at their wedding.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Loved the Story, but...

  • By Lisa N. Haynes on 03-01-18

Enjoyable & readable but predictable.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-09-18

I avoided this book for quite some time as the title made me think it was a fluff piece, a romance novel, and I just wasn't interested. But then a couple days ago I saw a Goodreads friend review it at 4 stars and explain that it was a sad book about the demise of a marriage. That made it much more appealing.

If I rated this book on enjoyability and readability alone it would be worthy of 4.5 stars. And if the portion of the book that occurred while Roy was in prison when the story was told entirely through the letters had been much longer I know this book would have easily rated at least 4 stars. That portion of the book was brilliant, and contained all the best bits. I found those interactions to be the truest telling of the emotions and experiences of this couple. The letters were real. They were the letters that any reader would write if in the same position. They were powerful and heart-wrenching. It was beautiful. Unfortunately the remainder of the book was too predictable and lost the emotionally powerful impact.

  • I'm Not Scared

  • By: Niccolò Ammaniti
  • Narrated by: Dennis Olsen
  • Length: 5 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9

A widely acclaimed international best seller, I'm Not Scared combines a coming-of-age narrative with a satisfying and spine-tingling story of suspense. A sweltering heat wave hits a tiny village in Southern Italy, sending the adults to seek shelter, while their children bicycle freely throughout the countryside, playing games and getting into trouble. When the gang find a dilapidated farmhouse, nine-year-old Michele Amitrano makes a discovery so momentous he dare not tell a soul.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Unabridged but Some Passages are Omitted

  • By Anonymous User on 04-06-18

transported to southern Italy

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-05-18

This b0ok pulled me in immediately with quick, terse, beautiful prose and a boy full of heart at its center. It is tightly paced and narrated perfectly because the young boy actually sounds like a boy and not an adult trying to sound like a boy. Mr Ammaniti painted the countryside of wheat fields that stretch across the horizon, 5 small homes nestled together and children racing each other across the fields on their bicycles. He built tension and fear and allowed me to mistrust the adults of the village along with Michele. And the book barrels forward with stronger reactions of anxiety as the pages turn all the way to the last one. It is not a hopeful book and doesn't end with all the frayed ends brought together, but that would have been the wrong choice. I was so shocked by the lack of resolution that I rewound my book and listened to the final two chapters again. Nothing changed. And although I wanted it to change for emotional reasons, this ending was the perfect ending.

  • Snap

  • By: Belinda Bauer
  • Narrated by: Andrew Wincott
  • Length: 9 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 102
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 98
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 95

"Jack's in charge," said his mother, as she disappeared up the road to get help. "I won't be long." So 11-year-old Jack and his two sisters wait on the hard shoulder in their stifling, broken-down car, bickering and whining and playing I-Spy until she comes back. But their mother doesn't come back. She never comes back. And after that long hot summer day, nothing will ever be the same again. Three years later, Jack's 15 and still in charge.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful, mesmerizing

  • By brenda hubbard on 07-16-18

a mystery, not a literary powerhouse

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-28-18

I know there is a huge controversy about this book making the 2018 longlist for the Manbooker, and that generally genre fiction is not as weighty or well-written as contemporary literary fiction. And, while I agree that is true I will not be reviewing this book with any commentary on whether it deserves a spot on the list or not. Generally I read three kinds of fiction: modern mysteries, classics and contemporary literary fiction. I usually rate my books within their respective categories, meaning that I do not try to make a mystery stand up next to The Count of Monte Cristo. In my opinion if I did that all mysteries would rate only 1 to 2 stars. But the truth is, just as I enjoy junk food even though it doesn't rate well when compared to lobster, I also enjoy junk-food-for-the-brain.

So, I liked this book but did not love it. I felt the characters of Jack and Katherine were well-drawn and that the mystery was interesting, at best. There were not enough of the common tropes of mystery to keep me guessing and trying to solve the mystery ahead of the reveal. (Ironically this is part of the reason it made it onto the longlist.) I want a mystery to make me sit on the edge of my seat and to shock or scare me. I cannot say that this book did that very well. However, if you want a quick and easy read that will entertain, you may enjoy this book.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Warlight

  • By: Michael Ondaatje
  • Narrated by: Steve West
  • Length: 8 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 587
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 540
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 538

In a narrative as beguiling and mysterious as memory itself - shadowed and luminous at once - we follow the story of 14-year-old Nathaniel, and his older sister, Rachel. In 1945, just after World War II, they stay behind in London when their parents move to Singapore, leaving them in the care of a mysterious figure named The Moth. They suspect he might be a criminal, and they grow both more convinced and less concerned as they come to know his eccentric crew of friends: men and women joined by a shared history of unspecified service during the war.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Instant favorite

  • By R. Hughes on 06-10-18

It both entertains and teaches.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-28-18

I wavered between 4 and 5 stars for this beautifully crafted novel. It is my second read of an Ondaatje book, having read The English Patient a few months ago. I like this one much more. Ondaatje wove together a story with so many elements and characters and it was easy to follow because all of it captured me and held me hostage. I stayed up until 4 am to finish listening. His writing is marvelous. Rich and textured.

There are many wonderful reviews covering themes, but I want to focus on one thing that really made me think. As another reviewer said, the book has an interesting discussion of the fluidity of borders. This element of the story was riveting. Fascinating. I learned so much about the limitations of my own childhood education. I was a child of the 1960s and 1970s, raised in the midwest of the United States. I was a child of working class, blue collar parents. I never met a person who wasn't American (and mostly white, western European Americans with no connection to their country of heritage). I never had a teacher who was an immigrant or the child of immigrants. I never met a person with a foreign accent. And when I learned anything about other continents. I saw a map with the borders of the day. Nobody even mentioned that those borders had ever been disputed. Nobody ever discussed the fact that WW2 drastically changed the look of the European map. It wasn't until I was a young adult in the USAF and traveling a great deal that I started to learn how variable borders can be, but even then it was discussed with prejudice. If a border was in dispute there was a right side and a wrong side. And the right side was always the one we were protecting. It was an ethnocentric world. This book examined the notion of borders so well because it showed the reader much of the post-WW2 political game that was played within Europe and its approach to the topic was intriguing and thought-provoking without being judgmental.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Tales of the Alhambra

  • A Series of Tales and Sketches of the Moors and Spaniards
  • By: Washington Irving
  • Narrated by: Ralph Cosham
  • Length: 8 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 106
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46

Written in 1831, Irving's dreamlike description of the Alhambra, the beautiful Moorish castle that defined the height of Moorish civilization, and the surrounding territory of Granada remains one of the best guidebooks to the region and one of the most entertaining travelogues ever written.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful Stories

  • By William on 06-09-05

You will be transported to Andalusia.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-27-18

Last night I stayed up until the wee hours of the morning listening to this wonderful book which paints the picture, the history and the culture of the Alhambra in such vivid detail that I was enchanted and transported. I could see the beautiful mosaics and hand carved details. I could smell the spices. I could feel the chill of the night in the mountains. I felt like I was actually there! And, for me, it brought back memories of my trip of a lifetime which I took to Morocco a couple years ago. About halfway through I actually stopped the book and looked for images of the interior and when I found them it looked exactly like I pictured it. And I found photos on my hard drive from that trip to Morocco which were exactly like the Alhambra. I was so thrilled to know that Irving had drawn the picture so perfectly in my mind that it matched exactly what I had seen before and what I found online. It is no wonder that this book is sold in Granada. What an accomplishment for an American writing in 1831!

  • The Elegance of the Hedgehog

  • By: Muriel Barbery
  • Narrated by: Barbara Rosenblat, Cassandra Morris
  • Length: 9 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3,765
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,578
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,603

An enchanting New York Times and international best seller and award-winner about life, art, literature, philosophy, culture, class, privilege, and power, seen through the eyes of a 54-year-old French concierge and a precocious but troubled 12-year-old girl.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • It surprised me

  • By Pyles on 04-21-10

A strong character portrait, heavy on philosophy

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-26-18

This is one of those books that I find impossible to review. The writing is extraordinary, unique, simple and beautiful. The stories of each protagonist are quite different. One is a highly-intelligent middle aged woman who works a menial job in an apartment building of the very wealthy in Paris. She hides her intelligence behind the job, allowing people to treat her as though she is less than they are. The second is an equally brilliant 12 year old girl who lives in the building and is contemplating suicide. Both of their stories are told in first person but in very different ways. The characters do not meet until the book is nearly complete, and this allows each of them to be developed with so much detail that you really believe you know them. All of this would often result in 5 stars from me as I am a big lover of books that are character portraits. However, the author dives deeply into philosophy (not surprising because she is a professor) which is rarely something I enjoy despite (or maybe because of) the fact that my oldest son is getting an advanced degree in the subject. The book is heavy on themes of art and beauty as well.

I will read this one again someday as I believe it is the kind of book that will grow in my esteem and that I will pick up on much more of what so many love about it if I give it another turn.