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Lillian T.

San Antonio
  • 19
  • reviews
  • 2
  • helpful votes
  • 25
  • ratings
  • The Woman in the Window

  • A Novel
  • By: A. J. Finn
  • Narrated by: Ann Marie Lee
  • Length: 13 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 16,359
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 15,047
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 14,997

Anna Fox lives alone - a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times...and spying on her neighbors. Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, mother, their teenaged son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn't, her world begins to crumble. And its shocking secrets are laid bare.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • STAY AWAY!!!

  • By Susan Olson on 06-02-18

excellent! A real nail-biter

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-08-18

This was a real treat. I was surprised the writer was a man because not only was his lead character and narrator a woman but he gave such details of her emotional and psychological make up. It takes a very gifted imagination to create in that much detail a character of the opposite sex, I think. Every twist and turn of the plot required the readers not only feel Ann was believable but sympathetic. And we did. At times I held her at arms length and wanted to shake her and yet I had to admit I'm not sure under those circumstances I would do any better. I look forward to the author's 2nd book.
Also I want to compliment the story teller for a very dramatic reading. She brought the story to life wonderfully.

  • The President Is Missing

  • By: Bill Clinton, James Patterson
  • Narrated by: Dennis Quaid, January LaVoy, Peter Ganim, and others
  • Length: 12 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 9,508
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 8,746
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 8,699

The White House is the home of the president of the United States, the most guarded, monitored, closely watched person in the world. So how could a US president vanish without a trace? And why would he choose to do so? An unprecedented collaboration between President Bill Clinton and the world's best-selling novelist, James Patterson, The President Is Missing is a breathtaking story from the pinnacle of power.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Wanted it to be so much better

  • By K. Moeller on 06-18-18

hard to put down even with it's flaws

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-28-18

This is my first James Patterson book and I was a little disappointed. He put 80 percent of his energy, creativity and words on the plot , 10 percent on the technical explanations of hacking and how Congress, government agencies and the presidency works, 8 percent on character development and 2 percent on atmospherics and setting. I like more fully developed characters. But he did have a most engaging plot. I especially liked the twists and turns of the plot as we tried to figure out who was the traitor.
Some of the narrators were excellent, the woman I thought was especially good at bringing her characters alive. I had the most trouble with the guy with the gravelly voice: harder to understand and very distracting. I got more used to it after awhile.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Girl Who Wrote in Silk

  • By: Kelli Estes
  • Narrated by: Emily Woo Zeller
  • Length: 12 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,185
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,897
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,902

Inara Erickson is exploring her deceased aunt's island estate when she finds an elaborately stitched piece of fabric hidden in the house. As she peels back layer upon layer of the secrets it holds, Inara's life becomes interwoven with that of Mei Lein, a young Chinese girl mysteriously driven from her home a century before. Through the stories Mei Lein tells in silk, Inara uncovers a tragic truth that will shake her family to its core - and force her to make an impossible choice.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very intriguing

  • By Claudine on 12-04-15

well crafted, hard to put down

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-17-18

This was such an emotional, mysterious tale. Great piece of historical fiction. Well written and well narrated.

  • The Last Coyote: Harry Bosch Series, Book 4

  • By: Michael Connelly
  • Narrated by: Dick Hill
  • Length: 13 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,306
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,856
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,829

Harry attacked his commanding officer and is suspended indefinitely, pending a psychiatric evaluation. At first he resists the LAPD shrink, but finally recognizes that something is troubling him and has for a long time. In 1961, when Harry was 12, his mother, a prostitute, was brutally murdered with no one ever accused of the crime.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Bosch's past revealed

  • By Dan on 09-18-08

great read!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-03-18

Hard to put down as all of Bosch Mysteries I've read so far but this one gave more depth of understanding of Harry Bosch and the true effect the violence that police have to deal with daily has on them personally, esp. the good ones.

  • The Red Tent

  • By: Anita Diamant
  • Narrated by: Carol Bilger
  • Length: 11 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,527
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,227
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,254

Passionate, earthy, deeply affecting, The Red Tent combines rich storytelling with a valuable contribution to modern fiction: a vibrant new perspective of female life in the age that shaped present day civilization and values.

If you like The Red Tent, try The Harlot by the Side of the Road, a recounting of some of the most startling and explicit writings from The Old Testament.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very Pleased

  • By John on 04-10-06

the author brought biblical times alive!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-26-18

It made me want to immediately take up my study of Genesis. She is quite the story teller. Narrator also very talented in bringing the printed word

  • The People's House

  • By: David Pepper
  • Narrated by: Jon Eric Preston
  • Length: 11 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 85
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 76
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 76

Political reporter Jack Sharpe is logging time at the tail end of a disappointing career - jaded about politics and stung by personal hard knocks. But after an odd election result in the Ohio Congressional district he covers, Sharpe stumbles across irregularities that spur him to dig deeper. The story takes him far beyond his corner of Ohio as he discovers an international plot one that strikes at the heart of American democracy by taking advantage of weaknesses in today's political architecture.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Scary but mostly plausible scenario.

  • By Chari Farin on 06-18-18

great suspense after a very dry start

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-15-18

This was a well crafted story that came alive in the narrator's voice. The beginning was a little too much of an essay on political science more than a novel but I'm not sure how else to catch us up on the modern spectacle that is our election process. The characters were believable and most of the plot's twist and turns made sense. The jumping back and forth in time sometimes made it difficult to follow. The ending was a little less than satisfactory with so much still needing to be solved. You would almost think the author was planning on a sequel, lol.


0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Wives of War

  • By: Soraya M. Lane
  • Narrated by: Heather Wilds
  • Length: 10 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 531
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 458
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 459

London, 1944. Two young nurses meet at a train station with a common purpose: to join the war effort. Scarlet longs for the chance to find her missing fiancé, Thomas, and to prove to her family - and to herself - that she's stronger than everybody thinks. Nursing is in Ellie's blood, but her humble background is vastly different from Scarlet's privileged upbringing. Though Ellie puts on a brave face, she's just as nervous as Scarlet about what awaits them in France.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Rather predictable

  • By Avidlistener on 07-09-17

well crafted story, but narrator almost<br />ruined it

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-29-18

I loved the characters this author created; however, there was a lot of repetition it seemed -- explaining character's emotions or reactions three different ways before moving on -- that threatened to drag the story to a complete halt. Part of the blame goes to the narrator who used a sing-songy delivery throughout the entire book. She sounded bored like she was reading the New York City phone book, White pages at that. I will have to remember this narrators name so that I will not have to endure another book read like this again.

  • Friday the Rabbi Slept Late

  • A Rabbi Small Mystery, Book 1
  • By: Harry Kemelman
  • Narrated by: George Guidall
  • Length: 6 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 514
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 477
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 479

Young and unassuming Rabbi David Small sorts through puzzling pieces of mysteries with logic straight from the Talmud. In Friday the Rabbi Slept Late, a shocking discovery on the temple grounds threatens to ruin both the diligent rabbi and the entire Jewish community at Barnard’s Crossing. Unaware that his congregation is grumbling about his rumpled appearance and absent-minded manner, Rabbi Small spends long hours poring over scholarly books.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • I slept late too, because i was up late listening.

  • By DARBY KERN on 12-19-12

Couldn't put it down

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-21-18

I read this 40+ years ago and still held my attention. Narrator -- also one of my favorites -- really brought it to life.

  • The Finest Hours

  • The True Story of the U.S. Coast Guard’s Most Daring Sea Rescue
  • By: Michael J. Tougias, Casey Sherman
  • Narrated by: Malcolm Hillgartner
  • Length: 5 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,797
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,646
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,649

In the winter of 1952, New England was battered by the most brutal nor’easter in years. As the weather wreaked havoc on land, the freezing Atlantic became a wind-whipped zone of peril, setting the stage for one of the most heroic rescue stories ever lived. On February 18, while the storm raged, two oil tankers, the Pendleton and the Fort Mercer, were in the same horrifying predicament. Built with “dirty steel,” and not prepared to withstand such ferocious seas, both tankers split in two, leaving the dozens of men on board utterly at the Atlantic’s mercy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Everyone should read this.

  • By mtkto on 01-13-17

a thrilling story fleshed out by statistics

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-19-18

The writer certainly knew his subject and had done copious amounts of research for it, but at times the use of statistics and technical details bogged down the flow of the story like an overloaded tanker wallowing in a rough sea. Using a journalistic style, the writer told this tragic and heroic tale best when he let the men speak for themselves and gave the narrative over to them. Considering the amount of statistical information and technical details he put into it, it is a testament to his writing ability that he didn't lose me entirely. I had to just glaze over long passages that would have fitted better in a Coast Guard manual. It was very interesting but I could not always visualize the drama because the action was steeped in a knowledge of these vessels that the writer was trying valiantly to impart but sadly got lost in translation. I am glad I stuck with it.
The narrator managed to keep the story foremost in our minds by the way he handled all of the numbers, treating them as important sidebars to the main topic. His voice would put parentheses around the densest material, so that if I didn't grasp some detail I didn't stop and back up. He had a news anchor's voice, easy to understand.
This story will stay with me for a long time. The physical endurance of all the seamen, rescuers and rescued alike, was nothing short of miraculous! I came away with a greater respect for anyone who works on the water.

  • The Jewel That Was Ours

  • By: Colin Dexter
  • Narrated by: Frederick Davidson
  • Length: 8 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 58
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 48
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 47

The case seems so simple that Inspector Morse deems it beneath his notice. A wealthy, elderly American tourist has a heart attack in her room at Oxford’s luxurious Randolph Hotel. Missing from the scene is the lady’s handbag, which contained the Wolvercote Tongue, a priceless jewel that her late husband had bequeathed to the Ashmolean Museum just across the street. Morse proceeds to spend a great deal of time thinking—and drinking—in the hotel’s bar, certain the solution is close at hand, until conflicting stories, suspicious doings, and a real murder convince him otherwise.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Horrible narration!

  • By Arsenio Paez on 10-02-15

I wish I had found this author long ago!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-10-18

What makes Colin Dexter's writing memorable is his style, his obvious affection for literary techniques such as alliteration and the deft. painting of his characters in a few quick strokes. Each is given enough depth of personality to allow them a full range of emotions needed to bring his stories to life. As all of the best mystery writers do, he creates a novel that happens to be a mystery. I have one negative comment: the literary quotes at the beginning of chapters were well chosen but when it is in another language shouldn't. a translation be given? After all you wouldn't leave a Biblical quotation in it's original Hebrew, Greek or Aramaic even if you were fluent in them. It is a kind of intellectual snobbery don't you agree?
The narrator on the other hand was at points a distraction. His breathing is very audible and at times phrases are rushed to allow him to get to the end and take a breath. Enunciation is not consistently distinct. Some passages are read in a monotone when a little inflection would be helpful. He seems to be very accomplished in creating vocal personalities for many characters.. That was his redeeming grace that kept me listening, but I would prefer not to be worrying that the reader was on the verge of physical collapse. There were many long pauses at the end of chapters where I was afraid oxygen was being administered and the next chapter would be in a completely new voice. It was very disconcerting.