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  • The Medieval World

  • By: Dorsey Armstrong, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Dorsey Armstrong
  • Length: 18 hrs and 16 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,064
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,877
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,867

Far from being a time of darkness, the Middle Ages was an essential period in the grand narrative of Western history. But what was it like to actually live in those extraordinary times? Now you can find out.These 36 lectures provide a different perspective on the society and culture of the Middle Ages: one that entrenches you in the daily human experience of living during this underappreciated era.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Prof. Armstrong is an rockstar. Loved her class.

  • By Rocco on 10-04-13

Just the right level of detail

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-25-17

What did you love best about The Medieval World?

The level of depth of the content. Not too much, not too little. Goldilocks!

What did you like best about this story?

It was interesting all the way through, even the art lecture or two, which I thought I'd be bored by. Also I particularly liked hearing about the Vikings in the same month a nat geo article arrived on the subject!

What about Professor Dorsey Armstrong’s performance did you like?

Her voice is pleasant, and she keeps it interesting by use of tone modulation, which is helped by her obvious natural enthusiasm in the subject, as well as a conversational manner of delivery. Well done.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

no

Any additional comments?

no

  • Proxima: Book 1

  • By: Stephen Baxter
  • Narrated by: Kyle McCarley
  • Length: 17 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 433
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 397
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 395

The very far future: The galaxy is a drifting wreck of black holes, neutron stars, and chill white dwarfs. The age of star formation is long past. Yet there is life here, feeding off the energies of the stellar remnants, and there is mind, a tremendous galaxy-spanning intelligence each of whose thoughts lasts a hundred thousand years. And this mind cradles memories of a long-gone age when a more compact universe was full of light... The 27th century: Proxima Centauri, an undistinguished red dwarf star, is the nearest star to our sun. How would it be to live on such a world?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • No Sense of Conclusion

  • By Lisa Davidson on 04-24-16

Lots of original ideas; well executed; I loved it

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-20-15

If you could sum up Proxima: Book 1 in three words, what would they be?

Original; spell-binding; brutal

Any additional comments?

This story earns credibility for the good times by not pulling punches on the bad ones. Just like real life.
For sci-fi fans that want (mostly) physics credibility, this is a jackpot. Except for the kernels and the hatch, it is all plausible.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful