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Leah

  • 148
  • reviews
  • 163
  • helpful votes
  • 149
  • ratings
  • Silent Siren

  • Memoirs of a Life Saving Mortician
  • By: Matthew Franklin Sias
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Todd Ross
  • Length: 8 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

A 23-year veteran of emergency medical services, paramedic Matthew Sias took a detour in his career to pursue the death-care business and found a complementarity between two seemingly divergent careers. Silent Siren: Memoirs of a Life Saving Mortician is the record of some of the more memorable calls he has responded to through the years.   

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Informative. Compassionate.

  • By Leah on 02-14-19

Informative. Compassionate.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-14-19

I love how this author has such a passion for compassion. There are many stories of patients, both here and gone-all told with brilliant observation to each one in order to handle them with such compassion.
It amazes me that a person is compelled to serve the dead with the utmost dignity and respect, even when nobody, including the patient (?) is looking.

  • Struck

  • A Husband’s Memoir of Trauma and Triumph
  • By: Douglas Segal
  • Narrated by: Douglas Segal
  • Length: 7 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 5

One of life's biggest cliches becomes a horrific reality when Douglas Segal's wife and young daughter are hit head-on by a Los Angeles city bus. Miraculously, his daughter was unharmed, but his wife faced a series of life-threatening injuries. Following the accident, Segal began sending regular email updates to their circle of friends and family - a list that continued to grow as others heard of the event. Segal's compelling memoir is an intimate and honest chronicle built around these email updates and is a profound example of how people show up for one another in times of crisis.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Makes you think....

  • By Leah on 01-13-19

Makes you think....

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-13-19

One minute, you're going about your morning, and the next-life as you know it is changed forever.
This book sure made me think about mortality. I am reminded to tell my loved ones how I feel about them as we may not get an "in a minute" or a "maybe later."
What a lucky lady. And God bless the entire family for their growth and resilience in the face of such a tragedy.

  • Ava's Man

  • By: Rick Bragg
  • Narrated by: Rick Bragg
  • Length: 5 hrs and 26 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 394
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 217
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 216

Journalist Rick Bragg has built a soaring monument to the grandfather he never knew, and in the process created a powerfully intimate piece of American history as it was experienced by the working people of the deep South, a glorious record of a life of character, tenacity and indomitable joy, and an unforgettable tribute to a vanishing culture.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Deeply moving

  • By Kate on 08-12-03

Beautifully Nostalgia

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-13-19

This story is about the struggles of yesteryear. There is so much love, and family that one could easily forget how hard life was back then. It was what it was, and that was enough.
If you love love, and enjoy having your heart strings tugged-this is the story for you. The reading is so powerful that I was right there in the truth of the story. Beautifully done!

  • All Over But the Shoutin'

  • By: Rick Bragg
  • Narrated by: Rick Bragg
  • Length: 2 hrs and 41 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 418
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 365
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 364

This haunting, harrowing, gloriously moving recollection of a life on the American margin is the story of Rick Bragg, who grew up dirt-poor in northeastern Alabama, seemingly destined for either the cotton mills or the penitentiary, and instead became a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for The New York Times. It is the story of Bragg's father, a hard-drinking man with a murderous temper and the habit of running out on the people who needed him most.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • ABRIDGED

  • By Amazon Customer on 03-17-16

So down to earth

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-09-18

I loved this book. Recommended by Rory Feek in his own book. The lessons on life are so simple. And so powerful.
While I realize the stories about the assignments as a reporter are a critical point in this story, it took my heart away from the journey. From the roots.
I loved this book so much, I listened 3X in a row. Something I have never done.
From the crib to present, this story is about growing up hard. With next to nothing in the material or security of a father sense-yet knowing he was so loved and cherished by his mother, and grandmother. That's the gift he shares in this book.

  • Trans Figured

  • My Journey from Boy to Girl to Woman to Man
  • By: Brian Belovitch
  • Narrated by: Joel Froomkin
  • Length: 8 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

Brian Belovitch has the rare distinction of coming out three times: first as a queer teenager; second as a glamorous transgender woman named Tish, and later, Natalia Gervais; and finally as an HIV-positive gay man surviving the AIDS crisis in the 1980s. From growing up in a barely-working-class first-generation immigrant family in Fall River, Massachusetts, to spinning across the disco dance floor of Studio 54 in New York City, Brian escaped many near-death experiences. Trans Figured chronicles a life lived on the edge with an unforgettable cast of characters.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • How utterly exhausting

  • By Leah on 11-19-18

How utterly exhausting

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-19-18

While I appreciated the total transparency, I had to stop and catch my breath from time to time. So much happened, and such big changes-so close together. I found myself shocked that these life changes happened so quickly. I was sure these things were happening over the course of many years but they were not.
I'm amazed that one person can survive all that the author experienced and come away intact. Intact in mind, body, and soul. Bless his heart.
I could literally feel what he was describing where depression, recovery, and family were concerned. Great descriptive writing. I was right there, in the story.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Southern Discomfort

  • By: Tena Clark
  • Narrated by: Tena Clark
  • Length: 8 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 49
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46

Tena Clark was born in 1953 in a tiny Mississippi town close to the Alabama border, where the legacy of slavery and racial injustice still permeated every aspect of life. On the outside, Tena’s childhood looked like a fairy tale. Her father was one of the richest men in the state; her mother was a regal beauty. The family lived on a sprawling farm and had the only swimming pool in town; Tena was given her first car - a royal blue Camaro - at 12. But behind closed doors, Tena’s life was deeply lonely and chaotic. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beautifully written and beautifully narrated!

  • By P. A. Segal on 12-07-18

Dear, Dear Virgie.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-19-18

Bless this author for all that she has lived. All of it.
While I can't speak in kindness about her father, I loved how she was able to love her mother as she neared the end of her days. And I loved the purple posicle. Very powerful. She gave her mother control of her own life.
The nannies are the most important part of her growing up years. They were the anchors in her stormy life. The last visit, and the ice cream moved me to tears. How beautiful.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • About My Mother

  • True Stories of a Horse-Crazy Daughter and Her Baseball-Obsessed Mother: A Memoir
  • By: Peggy Rowe
  • Narrated by: Peggy Rowe, John Rowe, Mike Rowe
  • Length: 5 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 101
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 90
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 91

Peggy Rowe’s story of growing up as the daughter of Thelma Knobel is filled with warmth and humor. But Thelma could be your mother. She's the person taking charge - the one who knows instinctively how things should be. They clashed from the beginning - Peggy, the horse-crazy tomboy, and Thelma, the genteel-yet-still-controlling mother. When major league baseball came to town in the early 1950s and turned sophisticated Thelma into a crazed Baltimore Orioles groupie, nobody was more surprised and embarrassed than Peggy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Absolutely charming!

  • By Kathy on 02-09-19

Bless Peggy's heart!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-19-18

I also ordered the book, but I don't know now, if I'll read it. I loved hearing her narrate this book about her growing up years in her deadpan way. She speaks so calmly that you don't realize she made a funny til the point sinks in.
Hilarious, endearing, old-school, and told with so much love.
For some reason, when her husband began to read, my heart was touched in such a way that I could barely hear what he was saying. I just knew the words were about love. Hearing his actual gentle voice made him real for me.

  • Once Upon a Farm

  • By: Rory Feek
  • Narrated by: Rory Feek
  • Length: 6 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 165
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 149
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 150

Now raising their four-year-old daughter, Indiana, alone, after Joey’s passing, Rory Feek digs deeper into the soil of his life and the unusual choices he and his wife, Joey, made together and the ones he’s making now to lead his family into the future. When Feek and his older daughters moved into a run-down farmhouse almost 20 years ago, he had no idea of the almost fairy-tale love story that was going to unfold on that small piece of Tennessee land. He takes listeners on his incredible journey from heartbreak to hope and, ultimately, the kind of healing that comes only through faith.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Truly inspiring

  • By Ken Sayers on 06-20-18

Very, very moving stories.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-15-18

I'd have to say, the best parts of this book were Hopie's story, and the outtake with Aaron's feelings.
While I loved every chapter (!), I cannot stop thinking of Hopie's giant heart. Her courage astounds me. Bless her heart. Hearing her own story was apparently the what she needed in order to know for sure that she is worthy. That she matters in such a big way.
Hearing Aaron's feelings in my ears touched my heart in a surprising way. I didn't expect to cry as I did.
I cannot recommend this book enough. I'll be searching for the blogs, and imagining myself worshipping at the Cowboy church. In my mind, it is in Mayberry.

  • Small Fry

  • By: Lisa Brennan-Jobs
  • Narrated by: Eileen Stevens
  • Length: 12 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 962
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 893
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 886

A frank, smart, and captivating memoir by the daughter of Apple founder Steve Jobs. Small Fry is Lisa Brennan-Jobs' poignant story of a childhood spent between two imperfect but extraordinary homes. Scrappy, wise, and funny, young Lisa is an unforgettable guide through her parents' fascinating and disparate worlds. Part portrait of a complex family, part love letter to California in the '70s and '80s, Small Fry is an enthralling audiobook by an insightful new literary voice. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A beautiful, poignant, thoughtful and devastating memoir

  • By Robert Ames on 10-11-18

I love/hate Mr. Jobs

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-07-18

This is a hard story to hear as it is very sharp and prickly on the heart. I had to stop and start several times to sit with my aching.
I was glad to hear that Lisa wouldn't trade lives with anyone-even after suffering so much abuse at the hands of her parents. Especially her father. While her life was not mine, I don't know that I could have forgiven someone I loved so much for treating me like an invisible person without feelings. I'm sorry to say that, in my opinion, he was a cruel man to Lisa in so many ways.
I loved this story about a wonderful person named Lisa. Lisa, who matters. She exists.
I loved this story-yet I feel so awful about it.

  • Another Place at the Table

  • By: Kathy Harrison
  • Narrated by: Pam Ward
  • Length: 7 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18

For more than a decade, Kathy Harrison has sheltered a shifting cast of troubled youngsters - the offspring of prostitutes and addicts; the sons and daughters of abusers; and teenage parents who aren't equipped for parenthood. All this, in addition to raising her three biological sons and two adopted daughters. What would motivate someone to give herself over to constant, largely uncompensated chaos? For Harrison, the answer is easy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • great read

  • By Amazon Customer on 11-29-18

This is real life. Real love.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-07-18

First off, this book could only be read by the narrator. She is the best teller of love stories when it comes to harsh, but oh so gentle truths.
While I loved each child's story, I did have to sit with the Sarah story. I was confused about how children are removed from homes as victims, for their safety -yet they were forced to continue being victimized in foster care. How very conflicting a message that is. We can only hope our training as foster parents has tightened up.