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Anna Glowacki

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  • 2
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  • 13
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  • Women I've Undressed

  • A Memoir
  • By: Orry-Kelly
  • Narrated by: William McInnes
  • Length: 11 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 28
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 26

Found in a pillowcase, the fabulous long-lost memoirs of a legendary Hollywood designer – and a genuine Australian original. Orry-Kelly created magic on screen, from Casablanca and The Maltese Falcon to Some Like It Hot. He won three Oscars for costume design. He dressed all the biggest stars, from Bette Davis to Marilyn Monroe. He was an Australian. Yet few know who Orry-Kelly really was - until now.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • This 11 hour+ book seems to fly by in 6 hours it's so engaging!

  • By Dana on 08-07-15

A gossip column, not a book.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-04-17

I am not a fan of "tell all" books like this. However, as a costume designer myself, I was excited to hear about someone else's experience in the field. Peppered in between some juicy celebrity stories, I was hoping for the author's inspirational stories of struggles- such as adjusting to America as an immigrant, fighting for his passion of costume design, and struggling to make it big in Hollywood etc etc. Wow was I disappointed!

I stopped and started this book three times before I finally put it down . I could not get to the end. I was so bored of listening to the author's stories about partying while his mother paid for his expenses, long lists of women who I don't know and what they were wearing at which party, and pointless gossip.

The narrator was very good. Other than that, this book was a complete snore and a waste of my time.

  • The Devil and Bobby Hull: How Hockey's Original Million-Dollar Man Became the Game's Lost Legend

  • By: Gare Joyce
  • Narrated by: Bernard Clark
  • Length: 8 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 28
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 26
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 26

In his prime, few could dispute Bobby Hull's athletic brilliance - the first to have five fifty-goal seasons, the highest scorer on the 1976 Canada Cup team, the first to use the slapshot as a scoring weapon, and the first hockey player to sign a million-dollar contract. With his body-builder torso, and his 100 mph volleys across a rink, the world of hockey glory was his to lose. And he did. With his publicized marital troubles and his defection from the NHL to the WHA, Hull's star began to fall, leaving him broke and in exile from the game.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Learn the Names.

  • By CaptHowdy on 10-21-12

A Great Psychology of a Faded Star

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-25-17

Life is full of "what ifs". Sports are no different. We believe that athletes should retire at the highest point in their careers so their glory is preserved. This book is a completely honest look at what a faded star looks like. I was expecting it to concentrate on Hull's accomplishments on the ice. It definitely does. However, it also takes a very deep and unpleasant look into his personal life, mistakes, and vices the public was hidden from. It searches for the psychology behind the Golden Jet and all the " what ifs " left at the end of his career. An excellent read!

  • 1920

  • The Year That Made the Decade Roar
  • By: Eric Burns
  • Narrated by: Christopher Lane
  • Length: 12 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 28
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 26

One of the most dynamic eras in American history, the 1920s began with a watershed year that would set the tone for the century to follow. The Roaring Twenties is the only decade in American history with a widely applied nickname, and our collective fascination with this era continues. But how did this surge of innovation and cultural milestones emerge out of the ashes of World War I?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fascinating year!

  • By Williamb on 08-06-18

Diverse set of topics

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-16-16

I enjoyed the various topics withing this book- from New York 's Harlem to anarchists, to the suffrage movement. It paints a large picture of the entire American experience.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Sin in the Second City

  • Madams, Ministers, Playboys, and the Battle for America's Soul
  • By: Karen Abbott
  • Narrated by: Joyce Bean
  • Length: 11 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 249
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 142
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 142

Karen Abbott's colorful, nuanced portrait of the iconic Everleigh sisters; their world-famous brothel, the Everleigh Club; and the perennial clash between our nation's hedonistic impulses and Puritanical roots culminates in a dramatic last stand between brothel keepers and crusading reformers. Sin in the Second City offers a vivid snapshot of America's journey from Victorian-era propriety to 20th-century modernity.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great book - brilliant narrator!

  • By Z. Halley on 04-17-10

Every woman should read this!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-08-15

This is my favorite book ever . Karen Abbott not only connected me to her antagonists. She also made me ask myself a lot of questions on feminism. What does it truly mean to survive in a man's world?

As a life long Chicagoan, I have an obsession with my city's history. Initially, I picked up this book out of curiosity. I had heard of the Everleigh Sisters before. However, what surprised me was how moving their story was. How could I feel respect two madames of a brothel? The answer lies in the parallel of womens' oppression during their time, and how women are still held under glass ceilings today. As poor unmarried
women, , these sisters were denied a "respectable "life. They chose to take back their power and profit off the men who would never let them succeed.

I think every woman should read this book , and have conversations about it with every woman she knows. The most important question to ask is: Does society respect women with untraditional lifestyles any better today than in the past? How much pressure does society still put on beauty, landing a husband ,and having children?

2 of 2 people found this review helpful