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Luke Walton

  • 8
  • reviews
  • 19
  • helpful votes
  • 19
  • ratings
  • What Algorithms Want

  • Imagination in the Age of Computing
  • By: Ed Finn
  • Narrated by: Scott Merriman
  • Length: 8 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 29
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 24
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 24

We depend on - we believe in - algorithms to help us get a ride, choose which book to buy, execute a mathematical proof. It's as if we think of code as a magic spell, an incantation to reveal what we need to know and even what we want. Humans have always believed that certain invocations - the marriage vow, the shaman's curse - do not merely describe the world but make it.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Dreadful and Repetitive

  • By Luke Walton on 08-27-18

Dreadful and Repetitive

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-27-18

Horribly written diatribe without enough substantive evidence for a skeptical reader. Same points over and over... and over... and over.

  • The Works of F. Scott Fitzgerald

  • 45 Short Stories and Novels
  • By: F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Narrated by: Jay Wohlert
  • Length: 45 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 51
  • Performance
    2.5 out of 5 stars 43
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 43

The Works of F. Scott Fitzgerald is a collection of 45 novels and short stories by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Fitzgerald's short stories have themes that not only relate to the problems and culture of the Jazz Age, but were also about the promises and despair encountered by the young, as well as aging. Love and relationships between two mismatched or unlikely characters, such as people who are unlikely to develop a spark of romantic interest between each other, is common.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • MISPRONOUNCED WORDS

  • By Randall on 04-23-16

Worst Narrator Imaginable

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-04-18

Could easily be outdone by a robot. Not even relaxing. Horribly uncanny. It's as though f Scott returned as a zombie. Really wish I didn't waste my money.

13 of 14 people found this review helpful

  • By the Spear

  • Philip II, Alexander the Great, and the Rise and Fall of the Macedonian Empire
  • By: Ian Worthington
  • Narrated by: Phil Holland
  • Length: 11 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 92
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 87
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 87

For the first time, By the Spear offers an exhilarating military narrative of the reigns of these two larger-than-life figures in one volume. Ian Worthington gives full breadth to the careers of father and son, showing how Philip was the architect of the Macedonian empire, which reached its zenith under Alexander, only to disintegrate upon his death.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Bueller..... Bueller...... Bueller...... Monotone

  • By Jonathan Allen Beard on 02-15-15

Ian Worthington Should've Narrated

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-19-17

Perfect book for falling asleep to. Subject matter is fascinating and well researched. Narration is monotony incarnate. Big fan of Prof. Worthington and his Great Courses.

  • Galileo

  • By: J. L. Heilbron
  • Narrated by: Victor Bevine
  • Length: 17 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 35
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 23

In 1610, Galileo published the Siderius nuncius, or Starry Messenger, a "hurried little masterpiece" in John Heilbron's words. Presenting to the world his remarkable observations using the recently invented telescope, Galileo dramatically challenged our idea of the perfection of the heavens and the centrality of the Earth in the universe. Indeed, the appearance of the little book is regarded as one of the great moments in the history of science.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Stick to the printed version

  • By Tp on 06-28-11

Written By Copernicus?

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-10-17

An immensely bloated and boring book. The limited relevant information is merely peppered among superfluous mathematics poorly explained and not suited for an audiobook. The primary sources of Galileo (notably his dialogues) give a better representation of his personality than this dry audiobook. It reeks of Aristotelian scholasticism aka BOREDOM.

  • The Ethics of Aristotle

  • By: The Great Courses, Father Joseph Koterski S.J.
  • Narrated by: Father Joseph Koterski S.J.
  • Length: 6 hrs and 9 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 289
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 258
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 254

In this 12-lecture meditation on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, you'll uncover the clarity and ethical wisdom of one of humanity's greatest minds. Father Koterski shows how and why this great philosopher can help you deepen and improve your own thinking on questions of morality and leading the best life. The aim of these lectures is to provide you with a clear and thoughtful introduction to Aristotle as a moral philosopher.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Standard class

  • By Russell Granby on 10-27-16

Solid primer on Aristotle

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-03-15

Solid course. Not life changing but definitely illuminating. Professor is knowledgable and charming. The course on the Platonic Dialogues is still the best audio course, however.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Plato, Socrates, and the Dialogues

  • By: Michael Sugrue, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Michael Sugrue
  • Length: 12 hrs and 2 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 340
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 304
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 299

These 16 lectures bring the Socratic quest for truth alive and explore ideas that are as vital today as they were 25 centuries ago. Ideas about truth, justice, love, beauty, courage, and wisdom that can change lives and reveal the world in new ways. Here, you'll delve into the inner structure, action, and meaning of 17 of Plato's greatest dialogues, making these lectures an indispensable companion for anyone interested in philosophy in general or Platonic thought in particular.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Easily the best audiobook in my collection

  • By ADRIAN on 02-03-14

One of the most profound lectures out there

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-30-15

A fantastic inquiry into the true nature of Socratic-platonic philosophy. A great primer especially if one has already read some Plato. Couldn't recommend this more.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Tao te Ching

  • By: Lao Tzu
  • Narrated by: Emma Topping
  • Length: 1 hr and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 19
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 16
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15

Written around the 6th century BC by the sage Laozi and read by Emma Topping.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A quirky but worthwhile version

  • By Philo on 05-21-12

Translation and Narration weren't great.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-22-15

One of the world's greatest philosophies, but this isn't the best way to learn about it. Harder to follow because of the narrator and outdated (aka slightly wrong) translation.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Greek Legacy: Classical Origins of the Modern World

  • By: Daniel N. Robinson, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Daniel N. Robinson
  • Length: 6 hrs and 7 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 61
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 58
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 57

Virtually all of the major building blocks of our culture (law, government, religion, science, medicine, drama, architecture, and more) derived ultimately from the ancient Greeks. In these 12 lectures, you'll explore the continuing influence of the classical Greek achievement on contemporary life. The point is not the often tedious claim that there is nothing new under the sun. Rather, it is to underscore the remarkable continuity of the Greek perspective and ethos preserved over several millennia.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Daniel Robinson

  • By Jerry on 07-03-18

Absolutely Beautiful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-18-15

Informative, entertaining, and outright superb. Professor Daniel N. Robinson ranks among the best professors I've heard lecture both in my university and without.