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Hodge

Atlanta, GA, USA
  • 5
  • reviews
  • 14
  • helpful votes
  • 49
  • ratings
Forbes, April 29, 2002
    
    
        By:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Forbes
    
    


    
    
        Narrated by:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        uncredited
    
    


    
    Length: 52 mins
    1 rating
    Overall 1.0
  • Forbes, April 29, 2002

  • By: Forbes
  • Narrated by: uncredited
  • Length: 52 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 1

This issue's cover story, "Commander of the Airwaves" by Brett Pulley, profiles FCC Chairman (and son of Secretary of State Colin Powell) Michael Powell. Michael Powell is the overlord of industries with $1 trillion in annual sales, from cable to wireless to TV, radio and the Internet. He vows to revive them by taming Washington's worst bureaucracy.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • April 2002?? Really?

  • By Hodge on 07-24-15

April 2002?? Really?

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-24-15

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

Maybe something, I don't know, CLOSER TO THE PRESENT DAY????

Any additional comments?

Forbes may be a perfectly nice subscription, but I'm not interested in 13-year-old archives. I was trying this as a replacement for C-CSPAN (WHY DID THEY DUMP THAT??!!). Guess I'll keep looking.

  • The Last Centurion

  • By: John Ringo
  • Narrated by: Dan John Miller
  • Length: 16 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 771
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 558
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 562

In the second decade of the 21st century, the world is struck by two catastrophes: a new mini-ice age and a plague to dwarf all previous experiences. Rising out of the disaster is the character known to history as "Bandit Six", an American Army officer caught up in the struggle to rebuild the world and prevent the fall of his homeland - despite the best efforts of politicians, both elected and military.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Enjoy the story and forget the politics

  • By Lindsay on 01-28-11

Politically Incorrect -- I loved it

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-27-12

What did you love best about The Last Centurion?

The story line -- troops stranded in the Middle East when the ice age and 'flu' epidemic devastated all governments. And their fight to get back home, punctuated by observations about how the political powers that be (you know who you are) screwed up at every turn ... and made things much worse by blindly adhering to their agenda in the face of devastating reality. Like sticking to the global warming story line (and taking actions as if it were really true) when it was obvious that the planet was cooling due to changes in the sun. Scary parallels to today.

What did you like best about this story?

See above

What does Dan John Miller bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Good narrator. Pace and timing good. No complaints. I prefer to listen nowadays.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

Political Correctness Meets Reality -- and Kills People.

Any additional comments?

This isn't for everyone. If you're a lefty, you'll find much to be offended about. As a Libertarian, I didn't agree with his comments about Ayn Rand --- well, most of them anyway. This story, for me, was an unexpected gem. Thanks, Instapundit.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Making a Good Brain Great

  • The Amen Clinic Program for Achieving and Sustaining Optimal Mental Performance
  • By: Daniel G. Amen
  • Narrated by: Marc Cashman
  • Length: 11 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 175
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 52
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 51

Daniel Amen, MD, one of the world's foremost authorities on the brain, has news for you: your brain is involved in everything you do - learn to care for it properly, and you will be smarter, healthier, and happier in as little as 15 days!

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • A large advertisement and excessive repetition

  • By KJ in Chicago on 11-17-05

OK...I guess

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-13-06

Not much new...except his hype of his brain imaging services. Still seems to be disagreement in the profession on this. I think he's overselling at this point.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Broken Angels

  • By: Richard K. Morgan
  • Narrated by: Todd McLaren
  • Length: 16 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,891
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,658
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,669

Cynical, quick-on-the-trigger Takeshi Kovacs, the ex-U.N. envoy turned private eye, has changed careers, and bodies, once more, trading sleuthing for soldiering as a warrior-for-hire and helping a far-flung planet's government put down a bloody revolution.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Gritty, hard-boiled space action

  • By Ryan on 08-23-14

This guy is scary good!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-10-05

Can't believe it's only his 2nd novel. I enjoyed Altered Carbon but had a hard time following or really getting engaged with the characters. This sequel has a much different feel although Kovach is still central...different sleeve and still sorta Mickey Spillanesque but with some light and warmth in the darkness. You do NOT have to read the first one to appreciate this sequel, but it may jump start you on some of the concepts. The throw-away sidebar ideas are an ideational feast...wish someone would flesh many of them out into full stories. This guy is scary. Can't wait to see what happens when the Martians and/or the real badass aliens come into focus. He creates a fantastic but very coherent world which begs many philosop[hical questions. But more importantly, it's a fast-moving, engaging and fun read...with several interesting twists. I'm ready for volume 3.

8 of 10 people found this review helpful

Pattern Recognition
    
    
        By:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        William Gibson
    
    


    
    
        Narrated by:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Shelly Frasier
    
    


    
    Length: 10 hrs and 22 mins
    1,353 ratings
    Overall 3.9
  • Pattern Recognition

  • By: William Gibson
  • Narrated by: Shelly Frasier
  • Length: 10 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,353
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 601
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 607

Cayce Pollard is an expensive, spookily intuitive market-research consultant. In London on a job, she is offered a secret assignment: to investigate some intriguing snippets of video that have been appearing on the Internet. An entire subculture of people is obsessed with these bits of footage, and anybody who can create that kind of brand loyalty would be a gold mine for Cayce's client. But when her borrowed apartment is burgled, she realizes there's more to this project than she had expected.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not Unabridged

  • By Laura on 10-11-07

Tedious

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-20-04

Really enjoyed his earlier stuff but this was a snoozer. Probably should have been a short story. A few interesting ideas, but the international-blase-disjointedly hip gestalt left me mildly depressed and sorry I'd slogged through all the way to the end. And puh-leeeze....a techie-chick w/ such an aversion to logos that she gets the hives when exposed to a nike-swoosh and has the branding filed off the buttons of her levis? By trying to be totally up-to-date in geekspeak, it sounds dated (talking about googling someone & hotmail accounts...not the stuff of Neuromancer for sure). But I'm too stupid to cut my losses once I get started on a book...any book...so it's my own damn fault. The early signs were there.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful