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Myriam

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  • The Boston Girl: A Novel

  • By: Anita Diamant
  • Narrated by: Linda Lavin
  • Length: 7 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,096
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,816
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,808

Addie Baum is "The Boston Girl", born in 1900 to immigrant parents who were unprepared for and suspicious of America and its effect on their three daughters. Growing up in the North End, then a teeming multicultural neighborhood, Addie's intelligence and curiosity take her to a world her parents can’t imagine - a world of short skirts, movies, celebrity culture and new opportunities for women.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting story!

  • By LL on 05-24-18

Wonderful story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-14-18

I loved this book. The story was authentic and detailed and pulled no punches. It seems like a real memoir. The narrator was a wonderful bonus. She was older, so her voice fit the first-person narrator perfectly, and she brought the story to life in such a way that I frequently forgot that I wasn't actually listening to someone's grandmother talking about her life. It was a joy to listen to.

  • Breaking Free

  • How I Escaped Polygamy, the FLDS Cult, and My Father, Warren Jeffs
  • By: Rachel Jeffs
  • Narrated by: Rachel Jeffs
  • Length: 8 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 599
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 538
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 534

In this searing memoir of survival in the spirit of Stolen Innocence, the daughter of Warren Jeffs, the self-proclaimed Prophet of the FLDS Church, takes you deep inside the secretive polygamist Mormon fundamentalist cult run by her family and how she escaped it. Born into the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Rachel Jeffs was raised in a strict patriarchal culture defined by subordinate sister wives and men they must obey.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Heart breaking addition to the FLDS cult story

  • By blueskies982 on 12-10-17

It could have been much more

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-11-18

I do have sympathy for what the author went through, and she has a remarkable story. However, I didn't find the book particularly well written. She just frequently resorts to just telling events - 'this happened, then this happened', etc, which manges to make even the most exciting events more boring.

I suspect it reads much better with the eyes that the ears. I understand that there's a certain emotional appeal to having the author read her own story, and there are many reviews that seem to suggest it was successful, but it drove me nuts. The author has a very flat affect, speaking in mostly monotone. She also has an odd way of pronouncing any word ending in 'g', with the g very hard - 'anything' becomes 'anythinguh', for example. Of course, she cannot help that she speaks this way, but that didn't stop it from really getting on my nerves.

Worse, though, is that she reads in a very choppy manner, pausing in the middle of a sentence as though it were done, and speaking the next section as though it were a new sentence, when the words clearly indicate the opposite. So a sentence like, "He told me to stay in the room and and gather my belongings" sounds like, "He told me to stay in the room. And gather my belongings." This happens constantly, and is why I think the book probably reads better on paper than audiobook.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Last Week Tonight with John Oliver Presents a Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo

  • By: Marlon Bundo, Jill Twiss
  • Narrated by: Jim Parsons, Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Jeff Garlin, and others
  • Length: 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 13,261
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 12,486
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 12,423

HBO's Emmy-winning Last Week Tonight with John Oliver presents the story of a Very Special boy bunny who falls in love with another boy bunny. Meet Marlon Bundo, a lonely bunny who lives with his Grampa, Mike Pence - the Vice President of the United States. But on this Very Special Day, Marlon's life is about to change forever....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This story is cute, but let's be honest.

  • By João on 03-19-18

Lovely Story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-19-18

Any additional comments?

I bought this book as a middle finger to Pence and was happy the proceeds will go to a good cause. It was worth it for that reason alone. But as a great bonus, it's an adorable little story.Even if you are straight as an arrow, even if all your friends are straight as arrows (*especially* if they are), you should read books like this to your kids. When mine were little, I rejigged some of the stories to make them more inclusive. Sometimes friends made fun of me, pointing out that I had a 5% chance of having a gay child, but I always told them that even if I don't have a gay kid, my kids will inevitably have gay friends and I want them growing up in a world where gay might be less common, but it's definitely normal. Two of my kids are straight, and behaved like it was the most normal thing in the world when my youngest came out to them. I wish I'd had this sort of book to read to my incredibly well-adjusted, happy, normal gay 13-year-old when she was small, though. The fact that books like this will be around for her children made me cry all the way through the damn book.

I bought the kindle version too (hardback wasn't available in Canada) so I could see the illustrations as I listened, which I definitely recommend.

  • Mean Streak

  • By: Sandra Brown
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis
  • Length: 11 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,273
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,418
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,409

Dr. Emory Charbonneau, a pediatrician and marathon runner, disappears on a mountain road in North Carolina. By the time her husband Jeff, miffed over a recent argument, reports her missing, the trail has grown cold. Literally. Fog and ice encapsulate the mountainous wilderness and paralyze the search for her. While police suspect Jeff of "instant divorce," Emory, suffering from an unexplained head injury, regains consciousness and finds herself the captive of a man whose violent past is so dark that he won't even tell her his name.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Ms. Brown's book far exceeds usual quality.

  • By KC in Lex on 09-08-14

Very disappointing

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-30-17

Would you try another book from Sandra Brown and/or Jonathan Davis?

I thought Davis did a great job - particularly with his sexy voice :-D - But this is the first and last Sandra Brown book I will read.

Any additional comments?

It is obvious from the start that the tall, sexy, taciturn 'bad guy' isn't going to end up being so bad. However, drives me nuts when the mystery character could resolve all the misunderstandings with one or two words that never do get spoken. Here's an example that doesn't give anything away - he refuses to tell the heroine of the story his name. It causes great suspicion in her, but nope! Not going to say it! ("Trust me, you don't wanna know.") She asks so many times, and he refuses so many times that I started snapping at my iPad, "Just make up a name! Mike! Dave! Anything!!"

But I can forgive that sort of thing It's silly, but it is one of those tropes you find with books like this. However, the character's ultimate back story and motivations - the revealing of which Brown drags out absurdly - is so ludicrous, so completely and unbelievably stupid, that it ruins the whole book. She has some good plot twists, so I was hopeful, but nope. Complete letdown.

If you like Sandra Brown, then I guess you'll like this, since I am assuming you know what you are getting into, but that's it for me. I hope her other books are better thought out than this one, but I'm not planning on finding out.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Shrill

  • Notes from a Loud Woman
  • By: Lindy West
  • Narrated by: Lindy West
  • Length: 6 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,187
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,873
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,851

Hailed by Lena Dunham as an "essential (and hilarious) voice for women", Lindy West is ferociously witty and outspoken, tackling topics as varied as pop culture, social justice, and body image. Her empowering work has garnered a coast-to-coast audience that eagerly awaits Shrill, her highly anticipated literary debut.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Impressed

  • By Chey Davis on 05-27-16

She's awesome

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-02-17

What about Lindy West’s performance did you like?
She told her story just like she was sitting down talking about it, very animated and comfortable.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?
Both. She's a funny, funny woman, but some of the crap she had to endure really saddened me. She's amazing for being able to weather all the awful that gets thrown at her, and at such a young age, too. (By that, I mean it is my experience that the older many women get, the less they care about the nonsense thrown at them, but Lindy got tough very early - without getting bitter.)

Any additional comments?
I'm a fat female writer, so a lot of what Lindy writes about reflects my own experience. I think if you are not fat and especially if you are not a woman, you should read this book. Lindy is a funny, accessible writer who does a great job of showing people what it is like to be a woman in the public sphere today.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A Beautiful, Terrible Thing

  • A Memoir of Marriage and Betrayal
  • By: Jen Waite
  • Narrated by: Jen Waite
  • Length: 6 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 949
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 874
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 868

Before: Jen Waite has met the partner of her dreams. A handsome, loving man who becomes part of her family, evolving into her husband, her best friend, and the father of her infant daughter. After: A disturbing email sparks suspicion, leading to an investigation of who this man really is and what was really happening in their marriage. In alternating Before and After chapters, Waite obsessively analyzes her relationship, trying to find a single moment form the past five years that isn't part of the long con of lies and manipulation.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • There are people out there waiting for her...

  • By MaryPat on 08-29-17

Underwhelming

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-02-17

Any additional comments?

I listened to the whole thing, waiting for the big reveal of what crazy crazy things the author's psychopath husband did, but it never came. He cheated. Turns out he cheated a lot, and then refused to admit his guilt. He sucked, but the author's take on this seems to be that she had gone through something particularly, specially traumatizing, and I couldn't figure out what was so completely shocking about it. Traumatizing, yes, but an experience worthy of a best-selling book? I just don't see it.

Also, as just a small, niggling point, I was downright grateful to reach the point of the story where she no long had flashbacks to before the breakup, because the dialogue where she and her ex call each other 'babe' constantly got really grating.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful