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Stephen

SPRING VALLEY, NY, United States
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  • The Language God Talks: On Science and Religion

  • By: Herman Wouk
  • Narrated by: Bob Walter
  • Length: 5 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 43
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 35

"More years ago than I care to reckon up, I met Richard Feynman." So begins The Language God Talks, Herman Wouk's gem on navigating the divide between science and religion. In one rich, compact volume, Wouk draws on stories from his life as well as on key events from the 20th century to address the eternal questions of why we are here, what purpose faith serves, and how scientific fact fits into the picture.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Meh

  • By daogier on 08-15-11

Must read if you're a big Wouk Fan

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-03-14

What made the experience of listening to The Language God Talks: On Science and Religion the most enjoyable?

First, if you haven't read other Wouk books, you won't "get" or enjoy this. In spite of the title, this is not really a book about science or God. It's a book about Herman Wouk and his personal thought and growth. If you want to know what makes Wouk tick and what makes his characters tick, this is a great listen.I particularly enjoyed the breakdown of the War and Remembrance characters but that's because War and Remembrance is my favorite book of all time.

Would you recommend The Language God Talks: On Science and Religion to your friends? Why or why not?

Only if you're a fan of the Wouk classics such as War and Remembrance and The Caine Mutiny.

What’s the most interesting tidbit you’ve picked up from this book?

Wouk's view of how science and religion can be reconciled (or, really, how it can't be, but doesn't need to be) is interesting.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Power Broker

  • Robert Moses and the Fall of New York
  • By: Robert A. Caro
  • Narrated by: Robertson Dean
  • Length: 66 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,890
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,690
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,701

Everywhere acknowledged as a modern American classic, winner of the Pulitzer Prize, and chosen by the Modern Library as one of the hundred greatest books of the 20th century, The Power Broker is a galvanizing biography revealing not only the saga of one man's incredible accumulation of power, but the story of the shaping (and mis-shaping) of New York in the 20th century.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A spectacular history of New York City

  • By Paul on 01-01-13

A must-know for New Yorkers

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-15-12

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

If you grew up in the New York area, as I did, whether you've even heard of him or not, Robert Moses had a dramatic impact on your life. Virtually every highway in NY and Long Island is where it is because Moses said it should be and most parks are either there because of Moses or look that way they do because of him.

Moses was a controversial figure, to be sure, and Caro pulls no punches in criticizing him thoroughly and harshly in many cases (a Moses sympathizer might argue that the entire book is one long hit piece). But the book also brilliantly chronicles the story of one of the great bureaucrats in the world history; a man who simply know how to get things done and get them done his way, come Hell or high water. Elliot Spitzer once said that if a Moses biography would be written today, it would be entitled

What did you like best about this story?

The way Caro traces the development of Moses' personality from young good government idealist to power-obsessed king of his own feifdom.

Which scene was your favorite?

The confrontation with Wagner on inauguration day over the appointment to the city planning board summed up Moses in a single incident.You could hate the man and have more power than the man, but you still couldn't resist doing what he ordered you to do.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

This is not really a funny or sad book, though some of the anecdotes are pretty funny.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful