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Debra

Canton, MI, United States
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  • The Long Way Home

  • Chief Inspector Gamache, Book 10
  • By: Louise Penny
  • Narrated by: Ralph Cosham
  • Length: 12 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,452
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3,158
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,134

Happily retired in the village of Three Pines, Armand Gamache, former Chief Inspector of Homicide with the Sûreté du Québec, has found a peace he'd only imagined possible. On warm summer mornings he sits on a bench holding a small book, The Balm in Gilead, in his large hands. "There is a balm in Gilead," his neighbor Clara Morrow reads from the dust jacket, "to make the wounded whole." While Gamache doesn't talk about his wounds and his balm, Clara tells him about hers. Peter, her artist husband, has failed to come home. Failed to show up as promised on the first anniversary of their separation. She wants Gamache's help to find him. Having finally found sanctuary, Gamache feels a near revulsion at the thought of leaving Three Pines. "There’s power enough in Heaven," he finishes the quote as he contemplates the quiet village, "to cure a sin-sick soul." And then he gets up. And joins her.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Louise, what were you thinking?

  • By Sharon on 09-08-14

Pointless Analysis

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-13-15

I wish I would have read the reviews on Amazon before selecting this, my first Inspector Gamache novel. Clearly the positive reviews are from those who have enjoyed the series from the beginning. I did not finish this book. It was slow moving, with endless, meaningless discussion of topics that were of little consequence. Ralph Cosham's performance was the only thing that saved this audiobook.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Rules of Civility

  • A Novel
  • By: Amor Towles
  • Narrated by: Rebecca Lowman
  • Length: 12 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,649
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,998
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,978

On the last night of 1937, 25-year-old Katey Kontent is in a second-rate Greenwich Village jazz bar when Tinker Grey, a handsome banker, happens to sit down at the neighboring table. This chance encounter and its startling consequences propel Katey on a yearlong journey....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Like a Country Pastoral for City Rats

  • By Em on 04-18-12

Wonderful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-17-13

This was a very enjoyable story with captivating characters and interestng dialogue. I didn't want it to end.

  • City of Women

  • By: David R. Gillham
  • Narrated by: Suzanne Bertish
  • Length: 13 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 444
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 384
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 386

It is 1943 - the height of the Second World War. With the men taken by the army, Berlin has become a city of women. And while her husband fights on the Eastern Front, Sigrid Schröder is, for all intents and purposes, the model soldier's wife: She goes to work every day, does as much with her rations as she can, and dutifully cares for her meddling mother-in-law, all the while ignoring the horrific immoralities of the regime. But behind this façade is an entirely different Sigrid, a woman who dreams of her former Jewish lover.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Foggy, Ungrounded and Vague

  • By Sara on 12-29-15

Intriguing view of wartime Berlin

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-17-13

A fascinating look at how love and passion drive people and how living through war affects a person's motives and actions. A bit slow at times, but a good story overall.

  • The Secret Keeper

  • By: Kate Morton
  • Narrated by: Caroline Lee
  • Length: 19 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,867
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,763
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,763

England, 1959: Laurel Nicolson is 16 years old, dreaming alone in her childhood tree house during a family celebration at their home, Green Acres Farm. She spies a stranger coming up the long road to the farm and then observes her mother, Dorothy, speaking to him. And then she witnesses a crime.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Kate Morton (and Caroline Lee) does it again!

  • By Maria on 10-20-12

A secret right until the end!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-17-13

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

This is the best story I've read or listened to in a very long time. The plot winds and turns right up to the end. I became completely enthralled and did not want it to end.

  • The Heart Broke In

  • By: James Meek
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 14 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 43
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 36

From James Meek, the prize-winning author of the international best seller The People’s Act of Love, comes a rich and intricate novel about everything that matters to us now: children, celebrity, secrets and shame, the quest for youth, loyalty and betrayal, falls from grace, acts of terror, and the wonderful, terrible inescapability of family.Ritchie Shepherd, an aging pop star and a producer of a reality show for teen talent, is starting to trip over his own lies.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Just too distant and complicated.

  • By danpri on 11-01-12

A few interesting insights

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-11-12

Would you try another book from James Meek and/or John Lee?

Probably not.

How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

Reduce the amount of long, dull descriptions of events.

What about John Lee’s performance did you like?

Effective, fit the tone of the story.

Any additional comments?

While the book offered some intriguing insights into the human condition, there were several long, boring dissertations of thoughts and activities that didn't add much to the overall story.