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Hansi

Brooklet, Georgia, United States
  • 8
  • reviews
  • 16
  • helpful votes
  • 213
  • ratings
  • Sea of Poppies

  • By: Amitav Ghosh
  • Narrated by: Phil Gigante
  • Length: 18 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 592
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 378
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 379

At the heart of this vibrant saga is an immense ship, the Ibis. Its destiny is a tumultuous voyage across the Indian Ocean, its purpose to fight China's vicious 19th-century Opium Wars. As for the crew, they are a motley array of sailors and stowaways, coolies and convicts.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • ignorance may be bliss

  • By Evelyn M Kloepper on 07-27-09

A decent reader, poorly prepared

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-01-18

Phil Gigante is a great reader, but couldn't some producer have advised him on the pronunciation of Hindustani words? The consistent mispronunciation of Anglo-Indian spellings (e.g. "duffadar") is quite annoying.

  • Wordsworth

  • Selected Poems
  • By: William Wordsworth
  • Narrated by: Frederick Davidson
  • Length: 3 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4

William Wordsworth (1770 -1850) is one of the most popular and enduring of the English poets. His poetry is beloved for its deep feeling, its use of ordinary speech, and its celebration of nature and of the beauty and poetry in the commonplace. Together with his friend, the poet and political activist Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Wordsworth helped launch the romantic age in English literature. These poems demonstrate the astonishing range and beauty of Wordsworth’s work and his sustained, coherent vision.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A marvellous collection, beautifully read.

  • By Hansi on 08-21-16

A marvellous collection, beautifully read.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-21-16

TABLE OF CONTENTS:
My Heart Leaps Up
To a Butterfly
Alice Fell, or Poverty
Lucy Grey, or Solitude
We Are Seven
To HC, 6 yrs. old
Elegiac Stanzas
The Lucy Poems
- Strange fits of passion have I known
- She dwelt among the untrodden ways
- I travelled among unknown men
- Three years she grew in sun and shower
- A slumber did my spirit seal
The Green Linnet
To the Small Celandine
The Seven Sisters
To the Cuckoo
Nutting
She was a Phantom of delight
The Daffodils
The Reverie of Poor Susan
Tintern Abbey
Expostulation and Reply
The Tables Turned
To a Young Lady, who had been reproached…
Vernal Ode
Humming Bee
It is a beauteous evening
The world is too much with us
Scorn not the Sonnet
With how sad steps, o Moon
Composed Upon Westminster Bridge
On the Extinction of the Venetian Republic
Thought of a Briton on the Subjugation of Switzerland
Milton
To the Men of Kent
The Solitary Reaper
Yarrow Unvisited
Yarrow Visited
Yarrow Revisited
Lines Written in Early Spring
Ode to Duty
Character of the Happy Warrior
Ode, Composed on May Morning
Ode: Intimations of Immortality
Michael
To a Skylark
Selections form the Prelude:
1. Childhood
2. Residence at Cambridge
3. Residence in London
4. Retrospect
5. Imagination and Taste
6. Conclusion
French Revolution
Goody Blake and Harry Gill
Surprised by Joy
Fragment: Redundance
Great men have been among us

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Night Train at Deoli

  • And Other Stories
  • By: Mr. Ruskin Bond
  • Narrated by: Mr. Chippy Gangjee
  • Length: 10 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 6

Ruskin Bond’s stories are predominantly set in the beautiful hill country of Garhwal, where he has made his home for the last 25 years. Some of these stories present people who, consciously or otherwise, need each other: people in love or in need of love, the awkward adolescent and the timid lover. Some are gently satirical studies about village and small-town braggarts and petty officials. Several others mourn the gradual erosion of the beauty of the hills (and the gentle people who live on them) with the coming of the steel and dust and worries of modern civilization.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Charming stories, fantastic reader!

  • By Hansi on 02-18-15

Charming stories, fantastic reader!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-18-15

For lovers of Bond's gentle humor, this is a delightful collection, the enjoyment of which is further enhanced by Chippy Gangjee's beautiful narration. Rarely is a narrator so audibly amused by his text as Gangjee, who frequently laughs out loud.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Man in the High Castle

  • By: Philip K. Dick
  • Narrated by: Tom Weiner
  • Length: 8 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 818
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 602
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 609

It's America in 1962. Slavery is legal once again. The few Jews who still survive hide under assumed names. In San Francisco, the I Ching is as common as the Yellow Pages. It's all because, some 20 years earlier, the United States lost a war - and is now occupied jointly by Nazi Germany and Japan.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Meta before meta was cool

  • By Julie W. Capell on 02-10-13

A strange book, an ill-prepared reader

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-22-14

PKD's odd little alternate history reads like a precursor to Pullman's HDM trilogy. Unfortunately, the narrator, in spite of having a German last name, is woefully incompetent at pronouncing even the most obvious words (e.g. "Partei") or names (e.g. Goebbels). The least you could expect from a professional production is for some intern to do five minutes' research to look up the proper pronunciation of a dozen unfamiliar words and names.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Ark

  • By: Stephen Baxter
  • Narrated by: Chris Patton
  • Length: 16 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 306
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 232
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 232

With the discovery of another life-sustaining planet light years away, there is hope for a chosen few to leave the soon-to-be submerged Earth. Holle Groundwater is one of the candidates, having been trained for this purpose since childhood, when the ships Ark One and Ark Three were being built. But as Holle prepares to endure life aboard the Ark, she comes to realize that her attempt at escape may be more dangerous than trying to stay afloat on a drowning planet.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • OK

  • By dunc on 07-25-11

Hammy narrator works hard to enliven dry hard SF.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-07-13

Chris Patton narrates his heart out in an attempt to breathe some life into Stephen Baxter's mostly dry prose. In consequence, the accents are hilariously over the top -- every Scottish character sounds like Begbie from Trainspotting, and you can practically see Patton wear yellowface when performing the Chinese rocket scientist.

  • Soccernomics

  • By: Simon Kuper, Stefan Szymanski
  • Narrated by: Colin Mace
  • Length: 12 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 268
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 194
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 191

Why does England lose? Why does Scotland suck? Why doesn't America play the sport internationally... and why do the Germans play with such an efficient but robotic style? Using insights and analogies from economics, statistics, psychology and business to cast a new and entertaining light on how the game works, Soccernomics reveals the often surprisingly counterintuitive truths about soccer.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting but older version of the book

  • By Hansi on 05-08-13

Interesting but older version of the book

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-08-13

This seems to be a recording of an early edition (entitled "Why England Lose"), so it doesn't include the revisions and additional chapters of more recent versions. Still, it's an interesting book, and the narrator does a great job at imitating foreign accents. Ultimately, the number-crunching may be a bit much for English majors -- those might want to wait for an audiobook version of Franklin Foer's "How Soccer Explains the World."

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Origin of Species

  • By: Charles Darwin
  • Narrated by: David Case
  • Length: 17 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 273
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 106
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 108

One of the most famous and influential books of its (or any) time, The Origin of Species is, surprisingly, little read. True enough, most people know what it says, or think they do, at any rate. The first comprehensive statement of the theory of natural selection, it does, indeed, provide the basic argument and demonstration of what we think of as Darwinism.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I loved it

  • By billfish on 06-10-10

In Defence of a Glorious Narrator

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-03-12

What made the experience of listening to The Origin of Species the most enjoyable?

While some of the other reviews show that the narrator is not universally popular, I could listen to David Case (aka Frederick Davidson) read the London phone book. Darwin's prose is notoriously dry, but read by this narrator listening to the Origin of Species is not only intellectually exciting but an aural delight.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Interpreter of Maladies

  • By: Jhumpa Lahiri
  • Narrated by: Matilda Novak
  • Length: 6 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,099
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 808
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 812

With accomplished precision and gentle eloquence, Jhumpa Lahiri traces the crosscurrents set in motion when immigrants, expatriates, and their children arrive, quite literally, at a cultural divide. The nine stories in this stunning debut collection unerringly chart the emotional journeys of characters seeking love beyond the barriers of nations and generations.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Novel-amazing; Audio-mediocre

  • By Jennifer on 06-03-07

Decent reader, disappointing preparation.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-20-12

Any additional comments?

It's fair to call Lahiri an American writer; therefore there's nothing wrong with having a non-South Asian American as a narrator. However, I do wish Ms. Novak had done a little more research about the pronunciation of Indian words (Dixit, Laxmi, Lucknow, etc.).

5 of 6 people found this review helpful